Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Appeal Democrat: Tuesday, October 14, 1958 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Appeal-Democrat (Newspaper) - October 14, 1958, Marysville, California                               NEWSPAPER Duck Shooting Hours WEDNESDAY Start a.m. Stop p.m. Vol. 63-No. 90-99th Year Marysvillo-Yutw City, California Tuwday, October 14, 195B WEATHER Sacramento Valteyj Pirtly cloudy tonight and Wednesday, High both days 77-87. Low taxlgnt W-58. Local Wgli yet- 8% low today 48. YOUR FREEDOM NEWSPAPER SH 24491 Prleit AND CHRIOSITr the dtvei ot those Red Chinese youiifrstnM in Cunt on (is they first American thay huva ovor on film. Everybody Tees Off On First American They've Seen--------------------- Hot Blast Of Hatred Greets Yank In China By JOHN 0 1935, NEA SPIVICO. Inc. All lights, tescivccl, including icpiocluction in whole or part, NEW YORK (NEA) What ol the Red Chinese attitude toward John Slrohm. the only American cor respondent wHh both and Chinese permission to travel in China? Amazement, first. For here was the mortal enemy they were ranting about, calmly taking pictures of their steel plfmts, thoir farms and their militia. Curiosity, too. I was a crowd-stop per wherever I went. I must say that my ego dropped when I found out that one group of school who stood up and clapped their hands when I entered the classroom thought I was a Russian! In a few spots the searing blast ot hatred continually directed toward our country licked at me personally, A cartoon of protest was drawn of me find placed in rny hired automobile. Once while 1 was hemp thiouch a fmm implement topair shop by the vicc-diiector of one oE the new a bclligur crlt worker pushed tawtircl me and thoutcd, "Gtt out! Get out1" On another occasion 1 sm rovinded ant! jostled by students who were seivinff the by ninmng n smnll blast I in nacc Sovuroly Lccliiruil Sciirooly anyone, onuo my idon tity as an American W.LS jnissod an opportunity (o lectuie me severely about Atnon can imprriaiism and the validity oE China's aunt An claimed ho once harl seen US rape girls in In Shiinehni. I through a street mcmornblc the icene whoie a drunken GI Hllecerily hill a pudtcub driver, 'Tfih N nut u limn for you to lin wtis tdc undfir- M Mem put nf futtnry Kcr In NnnklnK. My Intorpcrtor, wlio luifl trtinslalud a hundred Iditiirci to mo and must huvi) :ii tirnil til J uf tho priipiijriinUa monotunu, cumnlcd mu In t licit! words: "Yoti'ro tJin rinly Amorlctin movt tliem liiiVd n, today faced a sen- :ence that would make her ihe first woman to die in Georgia's electric chair. An iilt male jury deliberated nn hour and 11 minutes late Monday before returning a ver- dict oE gulltv against the de- Lint, who is gray haired at ind wins has grown plump sir'c1 IIPI aire-it last summer. Superior Court Judge Oscar Lutig set Uie execution Doc 5, but later granted a stay under a motion by tlie defense lor an iippeal hcaung, which he set Dec 13 Tlie death sentence was man- datory under law, since the jury, did not leLornmend mercy, Women Hanged No woman has been executed tsincc Geoi gia adopted the electric chair lor capital punishment some 30 ycdiE ago, Only three women in itato hulory ever have paid with their lives, nil by hanging. The state, in presenting its case, constructed an Imposing ar- ray ol evidence that Anjette slipped an arsenic based ant poison into the load and drink of those closest to her nearly seven years agb Evidence -tended" ffi show that hatred and greed were her mot ivies Her first victim, the charged, was Ben J, Lylos Jr., her fust husband wlio died Jan, H5 19i2 The second alleged vic- tim was Joe Ncal Gabbert, n big anlmos pilot torn Texas whose five-month marriage lo Anjette ended in -i liomblc, writhing dcatli on Deu. 2, 1955 Dlod In April The thud victim named, Mrs Julia Young Lylcs, mother of tlie toil husband, died Sept, 23, 1357. Mar HI a Elaine tlie 9 year old ditughtm1 whose Illness tiiggcred an investigation, died last April 5, The state chaiged the defendant inherited beneficiary ot tbc alleged victims. Russia Lashed UNITED NATIONS, Britain accused Ruiiiui todny ol ].tying down an ultimatum to the on nuclear weapons tests, nnd said that if the pi mined thi'ec power Geneva talks succeed theie will be no leason lor any power pvor to hold further test blasts Bnlish Minister Slate Cmdr Allim Noble said Russia would pioter to "stampede" [ho UN. GenctMl Assembly into a hasly nnd unrealistic declaration" on unconditional prohibition o( nu tlonr IcsLs. He lold Ihe assembly's Mum Politic u I Committee that Soviet Deputy Foieign Minister Valerian A Zorin had deliveied a nuclear ultimatum in expounding the Kremlin's pohcy lait Friduv. "He .said in effect that if the United Kingdom and the United States do not itccept tlw arbitrary niocedlirp demanded by the Sov- Jct Union lor dealing with the problem nf nucloai weapons tests, thon the Soviet Union IN forthwith going ta conduct anolhpr large SOIICB ol nuclear tests oC its Nriblc said. "It we are to reach the agrefir mcnts on disaimttmenl which tlK peoples of the world so aidentlv desire. It wilt not be by .metliods sut-h ui Britain has joined the U S and 35 other pouutricf, in sponsoring a U N. resolution which would en- tourage the Geneva talks, due to open Oct. 31, without prejudice to their outcome. No Plans For Reducing Forces On Chiang Isles WASHINGTON, Oct. 14 (DPI) Secntuy of SUte John Foster Dnllcs mid today Bed Rim te to drive the United out of the Western Pacific and there in no point in bargaining for peace by ottering to reduce Nationalist forces on the offshore Islands. In any event, Dulles said the U.S. does not favor turning Quemoy and Mttsu over to the Beds In an effort to buy peace. The U.S. is not In the business of giving away other territory even if the Nationalists would agree, he VOODOO Anjflte Lylw, IK erwortcd from courtroom In Miicon, Gu., whern she was convicted for the nrttPnlc poittontHK murder of her 9-yettT-old daughter. Thf hux- ota, Hodnlly prominent willow, sn iillcgni voodno fancier, In nlsa I'hnrgod with the murder of two hUNbilnth and ft Bomb Plotters i Believed Known ATLANTA, Oot 14 Police disclosed today they have corroborated a suspect's statement that a bomb plot against the Atlanta JewUh Temple was hatched at a met ting ol ait mntl Semitic undfirRrouini oftnlwituai here, las.t .May 5. added. Dulles told a confer- ence the U.S., in fact, has no plans to nrge Chiang Kai- ihek to reduce hit forces on ;he offshore islands. He said these forces conceivably might be reduced sometime in tlie future if the Nation- alists decide to try to work out a more useful disposition of their military might. The secretary (ho ire clearly trying (o drive Ihe wedge between the U.S. ind Qilna and the Americana dear out ttt the uea. We tnuHt be ewetul not to plmy their pum, he cautioned. He appealed ojjgftnlwi _ Offlcert have tlie" Hie live men. who attended the meet- Ins Authorities appeared 1o be on the verge of cracking wide open a terror attack on Jewish hyna. gogao.s and tomnlcs m the Sotrtli Local authorities, working hand in hand with the FBI, were confi- dent they on the Wght twck They have been woi'king around (he clock on tlie since dyna- mite (ripped a huge hole in the fashionable temple eji-ly Sunday. causing clamafic Detective Sgt. M. W. BlackweH said a had higncd a state- ment, the details ol which have been corroborated by police, about prehmlnnry plons for (tie temple bombing. t Wull Graup Blackwell said the man. wliote name was not icvealed, told of a 'small but very well organised" anti-Semitic gtoup at work In the Sooth. He said this croup was ie- sponslble for the Allanla Job. The suspect suul most large towns in the South have a few members, in cost cases "just a handful in u town." Blackwell said the FBI was checking on Inlormalion fiom the suspect thol 'linki piembais in Michigan and Florida. He said 1hr dynanilte lor the temple Job was to have been produced in Ilns'lan, Ky, a coal minitig center where plosives can lie obtained in qunn tity. Hp said the man who was to have aclually touched otl thf> bla-Kl was fiom Ala The suspect snid he personally Dies In Fall OAKLAND (UPI) Elgin R ChHnocllor, 37, Soledad, was kill- ed Monday when he fell 26 stories from the tower of the Kaiser Building where he wai a steel worker. WHS not In nn the blast, he attended the May 5 slralegy session hori; Ho was not invited to other moo tings, he said, be- cause he objected fo such vio- lence as dynamiting The suspect Indicated the tern- (Cant, m PURS 3, Col, 7) Solano Families To Go To Chico In CD Test Alert SACRAMENTO (UPD Gov. Goodwin J. Kniglit today approved pltms lor moving 500 families from SoJnno County to Gun In a test of civil defense nlerliipss Knight said it would be the first lime In Ihe nation thut a large- scale evacuation test hud been held in which participants have remained awny from liomo over- night, "Operation will be held Dec G-T Tho evacuation convoy wilt arrive m Chico ut about 3 pm, and evncuons will be ns signed billets In private Knight, who said the exercise was requested by tlie Soluno ty Board ot Supervisors ana the cily of Chico, congi'atulntccJ the officials on its to coincide with Day, and timing Pearl llatbor Illinois Synagogue Damaged PEORIA, 111 Jiomc- tared bluck eight powder bomb shat windowi and dam ect the interior of a synagogue Eirly laday and FBt agents joined police in a roundup of pects. Two Iron-age boys, who once confessed the bombing of an Episcopal church and who r hat been picked up in another syna goalie bomb scare last year, were questioned nnd then released Po lice said they would also question u man who hod been complain ing because he was fired by a Jewish employer, MO Fntnllial Rabbi Joseph Ginsberg, whose congregation numbers about 250 families, said he thought thi bombing was conceived by i 'twisted mind" Mayor Eugeni Leiter agreed with the rabbi tha have had no history here" o anti-Semitism and thai the bomb- ing must be the work of a men talJy-twiated pci-son although i MS "rcgi-ettablc, ot course." Police Capl, George Johnson Aid thai a bomb, also homemade tound last year when anothe Jewish temple wus being built It 1 ailed to explode. Johnson recalled that this also was a black powder bomb, and he Miid that among the first per lo whom police would talk would be two icen-afie boys Oni was questioned about the bonib (Coat, on 3, Col. S) to the American people not lo get their sights nar- rowed down to much to the Que- moy and Matsu picture that they fall to realize the broad Commun- ist aims in the area. He, pointed out that the Chinese Communlsti in recent treated the oMthore- island) "a? ft mailer o indifference." In a Oaxe-FIre bi'leC prepared s la lenient issued at the beginning ot his news coherence, Dulks said the U.S. "welcomes" Die eMension of the cease-fire at Quemoy. But he d he hoped that it would last longer than two weeks because "short suspensions of armed at tack do not provide a solid founda- tion upon which to slatlliie the situation in the intcrejsl of peace." On other points related lo the Far East situation, Dulles said: He hones both Republicans and Democratic politicians will calm down and not inject the Formosa crisis into the current congression- al campaign. He said that he and President Eisenhower had discus- sed the problem and agreed tltat the basic foreign policy in gener- al was a proper campaign subject but topical or current aspects should not be used as political ammunition. Praise For Truman Dulles said thai he grcally ap. preeiated the firm support former President Truman has given the administration's foreign policy in tlie Middle East crisis sum< mer and the current Qucmcy situ- ation. He Raid he completely agreed with Truman's that international relations sbouk not become involved in partkan politics at tills time. Before the conference, highly placed officials snid Dulles tied given a go-slow signal on sions to the Reds, But officials acknowledge Ihey are trying to pave the way for more flexible approach to the situation if the Reds show a sincere dciire lo maintain the truce. Suggested Flexible ,1'oBcy It was nt his last news con ferenec two weeks ago lhat Dulles first suggested the United Slates might be willing to adopt a more flexible policy toward the Chi- nese Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek to reduce his garrisons (Cont. on 3, Col. 2) Child Is Saved After Hours In Grave CLEVELAND, Ohio Thoresa Beehler, 2W, was rescued by police and firemen early today from an open grave In which she spent 3 terrifying hours after be- mpj thrown there by her father, The child's rescue occurred al- ter police picked up her rather, Lloyd, for loitering In subur- ban Brook Park, During questioning, he said he han "sacrificed my daughter to the Lord This statement sent policemen torn Cleveland, Brook Park and Brooklyn speeding to Holy Cross Cemetery where they found the child whimpering and shivering In EI six-foot deep grave covered by wooden planks. Little Theresa, was ruslwd to Bcrea Community Hospital where she was reported In (food condition suffering Irom sliock and expo- sure. Police said her father, who had been under a psychiatric'; care n year ago. was lahen to Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital lor psychiatric examinations. Party Pfec Ike Jolly On 68th Birthday WASHINGTON, Oct. 14 (UPI) Eisenhower ed his 6Slh birthday today by singing with gusto and vigorous- ly pledging to defeat, the Demo- crats at the polls next month. lie serenaded his wife, Mamie, with an early morning "Let Me Call You Sweetheart" and ener- getically called his fellow Repub- licans 'to battle with their political of each other. At a big GOP breakfast murk- ing lha slart ol his birthday cele- bration, Elsenhower was in a jaunty, holiday mood. The President's birthday started before daylight when he and Mi's. Eisenhower got up early lor the breakfast al the Sutler Hotel. They arrived before S a.m. e.d.t to be greeted by 600 Republican organization workers singing "Happy Blrtlwfey." The President received a huge birlhdoy cake made ol flowers, bofllling his diet, and songs and poems written specially for Ihe occasion. Desnilt three illnesses In years and having reached a point where most men who can afford lo have retired, Eisenhower showed no outward signs ot slow, ing his pace. The brenMast was given Sn his honor uy the staffs of the White M. Nixon, the Republican Nation, al Committee and Ihe GOP Con- gressional Campaign Organization. Tlie men and women who planned the breakfast seemed ta have considered Uie fact that Uw President, on a tow-calorie diet result ot his 1955 heart attack, tnrcly eats iweels. birthday "cake" consisted ot a three-tiered arrangement ot Ilowert designed to resemble a calte, With the cake was a huge birth- day card signed by hundreds of GOP campaign workers Irom every slate. There was a solemn interval la- the President's birthday schedule. Shortly after the GOP breakfast lie planned to join many cm hn administration and Ihe dip- lomatic corps at St. Matthews Gtthcdral In a Pontifical Requiem Mass lor the late Pope Xll, During a crowded morning schedule in bis office, the Presi. dent was to receive another birth- day gift u recording of Howard University choir singing his 1933 inaugural prayer. Tlw prayer w.is set to music by com- Iioscf Robert Rogers and .Uie cording, was to 'be presented Rogers and Deun Warner Lawson ol the university's School ot sic, Tonight the President and his wife planned to spend a quiet birthday evening at A small fam- ily dinner wilh possibly gome old trienda at added guests, Polish Cardinal To Go To Rome WARSAW Card- Snnl Wyszynski has received A passport Irom Poland's Commu- nist government to journey Rome tor Ihe election of a new pope, Wywynski prince of the will tx the only of Silence" in Eastern Europe to attend conclave ot the College ot Card- inals in the Vatican, NEWSPAPFRflRCHIVEc   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication