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Appeal Democrat Newspaper Archive: October 3, 1958 - Page 1

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Location: Marysville, California

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   Appeal-Democrat (Newspaper) - October 3, 1958, Marysville, California                               who expect to reap ijlanlngi of freedom must, undergo Iha fatigues of supporting -Thomai Vol. 6S-No. 81-Wth Year Marysvllle-Yuba City, California WEATHER Sacramento Valley; Filr tbiinigh tmtttrtm and probably Sunday. High both days 90-100. Low tonight 51-05. .Loot! temepntum; High yeiterday 100, Uw today 51 Friday, October 3, 1958 EIGHTEEN PAGES YOUR FREEDOM NEWSPAPER Phofw5H2-6491 Prfct: Copy lOt Faubus Says Schools Will Stay Closed LITTLE ROCK, Ark., Oct. 3 Orva! E. Faubits said today that Little Rock's'foul- closed high schools will stay dosed nil year unless the U.S. govern- ment lets them be reopened as private, segregated schools. Fnubus said in a news conference that no ono has urged him lo give up his light against integrated schools and there j_a no chance thfit hcjvvill reopen them integrated, "The peoplo have voted and the law stales they will remain he said. lit wild that whether llicy MEnv closed Nil yewi1 depends upon the __ ledeuil government i j Il.e whether he raiglil Rocking Levee 'Ihc Mcitysvillc Lcwe Commis- sion ycstcrdiiy decided lo go aiicad on its own tu lock 250 feet of be-im on the south Murysville levee to guurd agauuH threntoned damnse tin a to writer rietlectect by picis the E St. bndge. Alter lenrnlnR or an agreement pioposcci by the State Division ot Highways which would in eUect absolve the state ot any tutu re liability, the commissioners de- cided to BO ahctul vuth the lock. ing themselves but still continue with an attempt to hnve the xtate pick up the tab lor this work and any potslble fiitme dnmagc, 1 It's getting to Ihe point where It will be an emcrffoncy." docloi- eci Commlsstonei Coil Syvertsen. Commissioners Kiank Booth and C. A Otto concurred, expresslnp; the Tear that It the work weio held up for further negotiations the itate, It might be de- Inyed until it could not be ac- complished before the forthcom- ing Estimate Tne commission's the Morysvllle firm of St. Muu- wece in- structed to proceed with obtain- ing the necessary state peimit and the letting of an cmoigoncy contract tor the levee work, which is expected lo cost between and Engineer Colin Hanttforth of the flim ex- plained arrangements! would be made wllK the bndfre conttactor. R. M. Price Co., in order to inter- fere as little as possible with the bridge project, fie said that al- though the kveo Job would hin- der that project to some extent, it would not halt it entirely. Although expressing determin- ation to move ahead with the work as quickly as possible, the commissioners nevertheless stressed they remained willing to work out an agreement under which the state would do the (Cont. on Page 2, Cot. 6) Moore Sells 3300 Acres In Yuba The acre ranch known as the Moore Rnneh, northeast ol Marysville has been sold by Lloyd N. Moore ol Oakdnla to A. S. Murphy, owner ol the Flying M Ranch on East Walker river In Nevada, in B transaction Just completed. Murpliy also It owner ol other ranch lands in Yuba County, He has transferred to the Pacific Lumber Co., of which he Is presi- dent, ownership o( an area north of Marysville In a separate land deal Involving about Both Murphy and Moore are well Jtnown In the cattle industry of California and Nevada. Murphy beef HerefoitUi and Santa Gertrudls cattle In Ne- vada, the latter herd comprising 300 cows ot the breed developed and made famous by the King Ranch in Texas. Moore has widespread "inch with several associates at Qulnn River Cnmmg, Nev. The Moore ranch on Tannbo Rd. cast of Loma Rica Rd, comprises about 3000 acres oC rolling valley and foothill ranee, plus over ,100 acres of irrigated clover pasture. It is expected that Murphy will utilize the Moore ranch for winter- ing weaners raised In his Nevada cow and calt outfit, as well an pro- viding fattening clover pasturage through the summer. Walter E. Baker, foreman ot the Moore Hunch tor thp past five years, will remain In charge. The change in ownership bocame fcffec- tivc Ocl. 1, The S350.QOO transaction won ne- gotiated through Ben Edwards Reno, ond Fran- els Hall ot Marysville, defy the fedoial courts und TSO deputy U S mmshfils und try lo icopen the schools segregated "There arc maiw things. Ihnt are he said Fuubus taid the National As- for Advancement ot Col- ored People may have to piovidc schooling lor Negio high stwlenls in Litlle Rock Thete are no piesont plans to establish Negio schools m a cam- paign by a corporalion oE white to set up a system ol pri- vate schools m private classLooms nith contributed Junds In other mlCEKition develop- ments in Little Rock, Wiley Brnn- ton. the NAACP's trhlfl lawyer in Alkansas, said It might be possi- ble lo indict state Attorney Gen- eral Biucc Bennett (or pioposing a terior" against the NAACP. Bennett proposed Tlnirsdny nn plan to "neutralise" the NAACP In Arkansas and the South It includes withdrawing t h e NAACP's tux exemption, stopping "bonus" welfare payments to mothers ol illegitimate children, and taking community "economic reprisals" against pel-sons who stir up trouble between the races. Branton said that under Sec- tions 241 and 242 of the U. S. Criminal Code, it is against tlie law lor two or more persons to act or uonspue to deprive another peison of his civil rights. A fund laislng campaign for the private schools started In Baton Rouge, La. R. N. Bull, president of the Baton Rouge While Citizens' Coun- cil, said his organisation, in coop- eration with the Southern Gen- tlemen's Association, hopes to raise aiound The Rev Wesley Prudcn, prchi- tlont of the Capital Citizens Coun- cil In Litlle Rock, said he liad been by the Louisiana segregationists tliat none of the funds raised would go for educa- tion of Nogto "The Negro children are to raise their own money and oigan- their own bald Pru- den. "They are responsible for the mess we are in Bennett said he-haA written all southern congiessmen and sena- tors to try to convince them the NAACP's tax exemption privileges should be withdrawn. He stlid the NAACP was "building up huge funds lor the primary purpose ol dividing America and benefiting Communist ft uss Five-Doy Forecast SAN FRANCISCO (UPIJ-Five- duy weather loretoat for Northern California! No precipitation except scattered thunderstorms likely in mountains latter hnlf ct period; temperatures above normal: nor- mal minimum-maximum Sacra- mento 54-80, Red Bluff 55-82, Eu- reka Wa, Blue Canyon 92-11, San- ta Rosa M5AL Albimo, 61, nf Brooklyn, N.Y., climbed it llfiht-pnlo center Hold al Cmmty SUilinm In Mil- wiiukoa in ivuliih Ihp upoiifitff gnme or DID 19B8 Workl Series between Ilia yunhecs and the Bruvcs. Album) silt uiidlslurbnd on hla iiort'h tlimijrh in tml. Inon was imalilo to came cirmn iiltmc, und It took the fire duiuirtment to rescue him, Here liu la nhnivii bolriR loivniod liy (Iremen nftor tiiu same. Alacatraz Con 'Not On Island' SAN FRANCISCO, Get 3 Paul Madigan said loduy the foot by loot search of Alcatraz Island for Aaron Surge 11 would be willed off tonight, lour days aller he disappeared in a bid to' be the lirst convict known LO escape "The Rock Madigan told a news confeicnee thai he still believed the 28- year-old post ofticc robber from St Louis failed lo moke it lo Engle, Knight To Debate OCEANSIDE (UPD-Gov, Good- win J Knight and Rep. Claii> En- gle, Republican and Democrat candidates for the U S, Senate, meet in open debate here Satur- day night lor their only face to fate campaign contact prior to the Nov. 4 election, The two candidates will appear before the fall meeting of the Southern California United International Editors Some 100 editors and political writers are expected to attend The evening program, wilh the debate as the highlight, begins at Si.30 pm, when the two principals will meet wctally at a reception hosted by the Chamber of Commerce. Following dinner, each candidate will present a 10- mmute prepared speech, Mlowcd by a 90-mmule open forum, Edi- tors will ask questions from the floor, with each candidate allowed to comment on tbe other's answer, Cont rover Mai Subjects Expected to came up for dis- cussion are such controvermal it-ems as the right to work Initia- tive, California's water problems, Ihe current international situa- tion, and the stale's traffic prob- lems. Both Knight and Engle insisted on a no-holds barred, no suhiscl barred discussion. This could pro- (Cont, on Pugs 2, Cot. 1) Rush, Larsen To Start Series Game Tomorrow NEW YORK (UPD-Bob Rush, 32, a rlght-liander who never be- fore hail played In the World Senas, today was named to start Saturday's third game ot the clas- sic for the Milwaukee Braves iiKnlnit Con Larson ot the New York Yankees. Rush, whc> hud a 10-6 record this season, came to the Braves last Decemher Irom the Chicago Cubs in exchange tor pitcher Tay- lor Phillips and catcher Sam Tay- lor. The lost-boiler spent most of his career in the second division and called his assignment lor Sat- urday "something I've been hop- Ing lor all piy life." Milwaukee Manager Fred Ilaney was torn between Bush, rookie Canton Willcy, and, lelt-hander Junn Flztirro lor hii third-game 3tailer, but finally settled on the bespectacled ex-Cub because ol hla "greater experience." This Is Rush's lllh major league and, fncing Larsen, he will be in a position to put the Braves three games up in the cuirent series, Both Tr-arnH Practice Warren Spahn won the opening game on Wednesday, 4-3, In 10 innings, and Lew Burdette was credited with Milwaukee's 13-5 triumph Jn the second game Thursday, Both teams engaged in light wofkotits under overcast sklos at Yankee Stadium today, The next three games nra sched- uled to be played in >tbe stadium, Hush and Larscn both said they were In excellent shape and ready lo go, The Ihlrd game starts at 9 a.m, p Saturday. The odds favoring the Braves to win the aeries wore 31 to 5, but the "price" favoring Ihe Yan- kees to win Saturday's Ihlid gumc Increases to 3 to 2 following a Hood of New York money. "lie Is no longer on the the wnrdpti said. "I think he I'm waited for Ihtf body to be washed up on tbe Madigan said the tide flooded il the island, the watci was cold and Burgctt wus not a good swimmer, "Thai's a lough swim lor any- oven an he sold, Madison said the escape attempt by Bufgelt and a companion had been planned "lor some Burgett's partner, Clyde Johnson, Memphis, Tenn., bank rubber, wus recaptured slioctly after tbe pmr overpowered a guard at outside the prison walla Monday. "Thii, was tlie first foggy day WE Jiad had in quite a long Madigan said. "And'John. son told me they aha waited for slandaid time to be resumed so it would get dark 207 Inmates The FBI has taken possession of two plosive bags found wlien Johnton was recaptured as he stood shivering m tlte water. He said they had planned to use the bags as water wingf to swim the mile and a half to the San Fran- cisco shore, The island prison's 297 inmates, who hH been locked in their cells except at mealtimes during ,the search lor Burgett, will be al- lowed lo resume their normal roil- tinq Saturday with time in the recreation area, Ihe warden 'said Madigan had reported earlier that "the monotony- is getting them and they're They had been kept In then- cells so they eould be watched by a small number of guards while others searched. Murder Suspect Sought In Wide Northland Area SACRAMENTO Police and sheriff's officers throughout Northern California searched to> day Tar a 'cook who has emerged as the "prime suspect" In the dla< appearance of local television per- sonality Ogrien Miles, Miles, whose real name IB Og- den Miles WiMund, disappeared Tuesday and IK presumed to have been murdeied. Ofllcers turned their attention lo Rov Victor ,01ison, 23, unemployed cook with a record ot armed iob- bery and auto theft, as the ing suspect after a bloody butcher knife and clief's clothing worn found in a field across from his North Sacramento home, A North Sacramento police of- ficer reported seeing the suspect driving1 the car belonging to Miles after tlie KBET- TV announcer disappeared. Miles' ear was found deserted In Sacramento Wednesday, with on the floorboard and Firefighting Crews Expect 'Worst' From Fast-Shifting Winds Stop At Hospital WASHINGTON, Ocl 3 (UPI) President Eiacnhowei, bpoi'bly dtosscd in what would be appro, priale lor a weekend in Hie toun- iry, entered 'the Army's Walter Read Mcdieal Center today for an overnight medical chock-up The chief executive, in a hounds tooth checkered coat and casual flannel slacks, checked in at the hospital shortly alter 10 am The President, accompanied by his doctor, Maj Gen. Howard MeC, Snyder, was welcomed lo Walter Heed as he had been a number of times by Ma] Gen. Loonaid D. Ilcaton, cum maud ing officer of the huge Anny medical center. Eisenhower hoped to be out ot the hospital before mid-day Sat- urday and, weather permitting, he was expected to play (jolt tin won as his physical tests- were completed I'oUticul KKorlt lie spent a busy morning before [caving lot' tlie hotpital, devoting much at his time lo plans for one oHj-the moat active political efforts undertaken In the recent years. Ha was. ready to participate vig- orously in the current congressio- nal election campaign in boh-ilf of Republican candidates. The President's last check-up not related lo an illness was Nov. when the doctors found Jhim to be in excellent shape. A little more than two weeles later he suffered a mild stroke from which he recovered rapidly The new medical tests come, 12 days before his 63th birthday. By visiting everything this month Irom a corn-picking contest in Iowa to a football dinner in New York, by glad-hrwding local GOP leaders from Abilene, Kan., lo San Francisco, the President hope? to cm-reel some ol the apathy besetting his pasty. Before going to tlin hospital to- day he scheduled a campaign strategy meeting with GOP Na- tional Chairman Meade Aloovn and Howard K. Pylc, administra- tive assistant to tile President and one ol the White House political technicians, Persons closest to the President expreswd'fbellef his sUmma and general condition have Improved over the past year, Hungarian Trials BUDAPEST, Hungary The present wave ol Hungarian corruption trials will be climaxed later this month by a muss trial of 76 charged with having caused extensive damage to stale property, it was reported today, 3000 Acres In Monrovia Area i Are Blackened MONJIOVIA, Oct. S oil Kit-control brush fire miiiiiul it imlch of (lestrtKiUnn today and Miper- vttwn. naked Guv. Goodwin J, Knight to declare the scene di Mister ii run, Tlic tnurcury soared the lOO-degrce mark on the (Ira and In I.os some 30 miles to the where a blanket ol white smnke blurred the sun, MONROVIA, Oct. 3 tankers splashed thousands of gallons of liquid on. an out of control ntoun tain brush fire today as weary crews feared the "worst" from quickly shifting winds. Fire crews began back-firing on tlie ridges in an effort to contain the blaze. High temperatures and low humidity, twin foes of the tired tire crews, held to predictions with the mercury in the high 80s several hours after dawn. Blustering winds blew in from California's great inland desert regions to fan the flames. County Fire Chief Keith cr estimated damage to and valuable watershed in ot one million'dolling wtth-BO In illeuHon oE control. Monrovia Fire Chief T. Ted Becker hat 
                            

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