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Appeal Democrat Newspaper Archive: October 1, 1958 - Page 1

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Location: Marysville, California

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   Appeal-Democrat (Newspaper) - October 1, 1958, Marysville, California                               Milwaukee Wins 10-Inning Series Game By Score Of 4 To 3 r J "To insist on attempting to do by force what men will not do in free action is itself authori- tarian; ilf is the attempt to cast In one's own image; it is that weakness in man which lets him try to play God." E. Read Vol. 65-No. 79-99th Year Marysville-Yuba City, California WEATHER Sacramento Valley: Fair through Thursday. High both days 92-100. Low tonight 58-68. Local temperatures: High yesterday 100, low today 59. Wodnwday, October 1, 1958 TWENTY-FOUR PAGES YOUR FREEDOM NEWSPAPER Phon. SH 2-6491 Prle.! Monthly-Slngl. Copy VV NEW progresses' on the now E St. Brlilgo ncross the Yubn Rlvor south of Mui'ysvlllo. Shown horp 1st thu construction project aeon looking went (from the present b St. Bridge, which will be demolished when tho new foiir-liino high lovwl structure Is compl stetl. At the left Is the pile driver being used In tho ctirrnnt placing of fivn bridge piers which will go in tfee river chnnnul. U. Bl. HiirrlH, eotiHti'ii'.Hioii siipfirlntomlenl for tho R. M. Price Co. of (A-D Phoh) Pasadena, contractors for the Job explains the channel piers lire being worked on first, In an attempt to get them finished before the river rises. Target dato for potting the live In Is Nov. 15, with the remainder of the piers across the rest of the rlverbottom due to follow.'The contractors have two ycurs (dating from Sept, 5 of year) to finish the bridge, but expect to have It done In 18 to 21) montliH, Harris said. About 40 men are now working on the job. Alcatrai; prison. Although Alcalrax officials somewhere on the "Rock" or Peach Men To Meet Oct. .The Cnllforniu Department ot Agriculture Tuesday culled a scries of 10 meetings tlimugtiout tha state to take nominations for the 11-producer members of the Cling Peach Advisory Bonrcl. Four of these meetings will be held in the Yuba-Sutltcr-Bulte area, starting next week. The board, which also Includes 31 processors, assists the stale di- rector of agriculture In admin- istering the state marketing or cier for cling pcuchns. Schodnln Hero Schedule for the Marysv'iHe- Yuba City District is: Oct. Board Zone 1, composed of Buttc County, VVilsor School, Gridley, p.m. Oct. Board Zone 2, Sutler County north of Lin- coln Rd., Tiorra Bucna School auditorium, p.m. Oct. Boart) Zone 3, Sutler County south oC Lincoln Col'. 4) Morysville High Board May Change Date Of Election Marysvllle Union High School will have a special meet- ing at p.m. today to pass a new resole lion on the district's forjheoming tax election. Principal Neal Wade sa'd it is possible the clsite will be chnnged from the proposed Nov. 25 to Dec, 2. When the board passed a reso- lution on the matter at a recent meeting, the amount ot the basic tax was inadvertently stated as instead of the planned by the board, Wado explained. The trustees are a'sklng for a 50-cent override tax, on top ot the existing 75-cent basic rate. However, tax rate thin year was 80 cents, including five addition- al cents for employe which would bring the overall total up to ijH.30. The meeting Wade'i office. will be held In i jW! v A nationwide 'alert was urgett, 23-year-old gunman ROCK, Ark., Oct. 1- en the first man to escape The Little Rock Private Corporation announced to icvcd Burgett either that it will open private, seg owned in the swift tides of San tho possibility he ,had reached schools in private build ings next week if it can't use fou high schools. It was known that Burgett. the same time, the corpora equipped himseit with a pair appealed for public cqntribu wstterwlngs .fashioned from a to operate the schools anc tic citizens to report any suit "We've got to assume he's private buildings around Lit on the said Warden Rock that might be used foi schools. Madigan, "until we get some ,T. J. Raney, president o inite otherwise. If he corporation, the swim for it, we don't give plans at a news much Burgetl's companion In the Beaver, -22, a Negrc cape, Clyde Johnson, u complained that r white phis, Tcnn., bank robber, was shot him in the arm irom. e lured two hours alter the automobile early today. overpowered and bound Awaited Harold Miller on Monddy said "several" white boys in the car and they yelliic Johnson was found shivering and cursed as thisj tho cold waters of the bay, a Physicians at the Univer- oft the rocky shore ol of Arkansas Medical 'Center island him, but the wound was "We've got to proceed on serious enough for hirirto' be possibility that Burgett has in the hospital. the said Webb Raney said, however, thai FBI agent in will be done pending the Taking no chances that ot next Monday's hear had escaped, the FBI on a petition for a permanent all-points bulletins to the before the 8th U.S. Cir police departments currying Court Appeals in St. Louia court of appeals last Mon- Meanwhile, 75 Alcatraz issued a temporary restrain- and FBI agents continued order to the, Little Rock search ot the caves fringing not to transfer the shore Alcatrax, hoping school to the might lind Burgett stiU in school corporation1. Six of the larger caves at hearing scheduled next Mon- northwest end of the island will determine whether the bomboc'. with tear gas to no on Page 4, Cot. 7) Eddie And Liz Pitch Woolly Party HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Eddie Fisher celebrated de- but on television by rushing to the side of Elizabeth Taylor for a wild .and woolly lawn party that ended in the wee ho'urk today. The-barefoot Lin and Eddie said goodbye to their guests, at a Bol- Alr home at 2 a.m. Debbie Reynolds, from .whom the young crooner separated two weeks ago atler dating Liz in New York, was not present. The party, which included a fran- chase involving Liz and some nqulsltlve. newsmen, climaxed a wacky night in which Dean Mar- ;in and Jerry Lewis were reunited impromptu on the Fisher show for the'first time since their celebra- Liz, who. wore; a-, cotton dress with a 3-inch'belt, ran across the .lawn the home to a-parking lot shortly after midnight, but she sprinted batik inside when a news- man tried to question her. She and Eddie came repeatedly lo the door of the home to say goodby to 'guests. .The only car remaining after belonged to Dick Hanley, a friend of Fisher, and the late-Mike'Todd, who was Liz1 husband. Hanley had a busy night of it, repeatedly roaring to hired guards to keep newsmen off the property; All the assured, Eddiei he was great in his'debut, although the nation's TV. critics were not quite as kind. The show itself was almost as' Chrysler, Union DETROIT, Oct. I Chrysler Corp. and the United Auto Workers Union today announced they had reached agreement on basic contracts covering production and maintenance workers, cafeteria workers and parts depot employes. An agreement was de- layed on salaried 'engineering and office workers. DETROIT United Auto Workers Union appeared deadlocked on two fronts today in driving for contract agreements with General .Motors and Chrys- Nixon Crusade Launched WITH NIXON IN CALIFORNIA (UPI) .President Richard M. Nixon, the Republican party's top campaigner, launched a cru- sade in California today for sup- port for the embattled GOP ticket in. the November election; Nixon admitted upon his arrival in Los Angeleu Tuesday night that his party is running behind right now in its contest with Democrats for control of the nation's second largest ptate. "We have the fight of our liyes on our he told a news con- ference. "We must; wage an all- out fight. If we don't, wa can't win I believe we are going on the offensive with a vkind oi campaign that can win In the na- tion and; in Nixon planned -to concentrate vota-heavy .San Diego -County to- day; 'one of three population cen- ters he will, hit before he leaves California for Oregon on .Friday. In ra statewide ,television, speech in Los Angeles Tuesday'night, the Vice President urged Callfornians and Republicans alike -to get behind .Sen. Will- iam F. Bnowland for governor and Gov. Goodwin J. Knight" for V. S. senator "because they are .the best nen for the jobs." would, he said, ,on .he progressive'policies'of Presi- dent Eisenhower and such former California Republican governors as Earl Warren, now Chief Jus- lice of the Supreme Court. IfMuen Nixon Cackled three of the most controversial issues in the Califor- nia election campaign by declar- W He is against a proposal to re- peal the property.' tax exemption now granted parochial schools be- cause "we shouldn't take any ac- iori to discourage priva.te schools." He it would be a "cat- istrbphe" if the voters approve a >allot initiative sponsored by the American Federation of Labor ''tCont, on Vage, 4, Col. j) ler., Tlie UAW had only about 24 hours to reach an agreement with General Motors beto're a deadline which would send GM workers out on strike at plants throughout the There was no strike deadline in the talks between the union and Chrysler but'negotiators were try- ing to reach an agreement, lliere before any settlement was reached at GM. UAW president Walter P. Reuth- er, who left Chrysler talks for the second time, was participating in the negotiations at General Mo- tors. A week ago he placed Chrys- ler on the "back burner" but re- turned to the smallest ot the "big three" auto companies on Monday when talks at GM were recessed to'allow striking GM workers to end "premature walkouts." Reuther in the'GM talks only'briefly Tuesday and then took time off to rest up from the earlier marathon session which stretched. onver hours at Chrysler, Ike Declares US Will Not Retreat In face Of Fore Red Aggression Will Be Opposed WASHINGTON, Oct. I Eisenhower today reaffirmed U.S. determination to oppose Communist aggression in the Far East. He said this country will not retreat in the face of force. The President told his news conference that withdrawal of Chinese Nationalist forces from Qi.iemoy and Matsu has been considered as one possible solution to tf Formosa crisis. But he said he was not sure this was tne final an- swer  nd Lown. World hit? 5 ww plcki? c to laitn, who coveral T .cDaufdd dropped loopcr Juit out of UM> or .Whow. "for I on bill over hod Bui could not Iwltl It. fouled to Crundnll midway went 10 Mcond on' Wild llownrd drove dean to Puflto In left Tk x fcol in front jt tlit fonco. Jcft no IriYti 'Kb.10 out on Uine .nd No' rum, hit, mimn, one left, Covlnston to MiUi- to on Rubc'k WH called oul on o rum, tWUill, up errorn, one led. Lifting The Iron Cur tain-VI- Terns LegMatar Finds Russian Farm System Is Highly Varied State Sen. Hubert R. Hudson of 'Brownnvillo recently spent a month behind the Iron Curtain In Russia and tho. satellite countries. This is one of ft nbrles of columiiN prepar- ed by him' exclusive for Free- dom note.) By HUBERT HUDSON The Russian agricultural sys- tem is so varied that it is hard-to give ;an accurate impression that makes sense, a collective farm in Siev, capital of the Ukraine, cen- ;er of, Russia's iricKest agricultu- ral area; i also spent the day at an enormous collective farm in Alma-Ata, capital of Kazakstan, which is one of Russia's newest agricultural areas, 3000 miles !rom Moscow: The arrangement tor rrie to visit the farm outside of: Kiev was. requested several days :ahead of, time as this was the middle of their harvest sea- son.' At dinner the night, before my visit, a group of; American stu- dents (Including the head.of. the National Student Association) came over to my table. They wanted'to .know if I were going to be allowed tb see one ot the large collective farms in the Kiev area. After replying that I was going to- morrow at. they wanted to know if 4ney could join 'me. My guide said this was impossible. The studiints had been promised a visit to one of the farms and had been in Kiev for four days waiting for a chance. The student 'leader was infuriated as he hud letters torn Eleanor Roosevelt, Senator Humphrey, etc. and he was deter- mined to see one of the farms. As a result, the following morning the Head of Inlourlst in Kiev asked rats, politely if 1 would mind visit- ing a farm in'Odessa instead, as the students had made such a strong protest that he was embar- rassed to allow me to go and not them. Not wishing to jeopardize any of (he advantages that were being given.to agreed. In- stead, a trip during the aflernoon was planned to !he Kdmsomoland Pioneer groups (which are some- equivalent lo our Boy Scouts and which I will discuss in a later At'the end of a very tiring day, about my Molotov-Zim and driver met Nina (my guide) and me.- The driver asked if I would like to take a tour of the country, side around Kiev until dinner time, usually at; which I ac- cepted with alacrity. About ten miles out from Kiev we came to two large collective farms on either side of the road. I asked if I might take some pictures of, the in the fields. Per- mission was granted. As we drove up to the buildings on one collec- tive I asked if I might get out -and take some pictures. Again the answer was "Yes." I then asked if I might ask qucs- (Corit., on Page 4, Col. 6) Covlnilon frtulod to Bern. wni collKi out on itrikn. Adcock won (lo iteond on wUci pitch; Pnfko win unfj fir.t when Kubeic uinjjjed lilt (round bill, Adcock Snnhn' out. No rum, one hit, one error, two left. Ford win called out on'ntrtkw. CovlngSn" linll wi '1419 Knot kti the thttt (Cent. on. Col. 4) Knight Stands For Balanced Budget, Pensions, City Aid SAN FRANCISCO Goodwin 3. KnlgMj Republican ciuiaiditte lor U.S. Senate, U- vorn an amendment to tha Con. sllluUon which would force Oon- to balance the federal bud- BOt.. ..Knight saM Tuesday night he: an amendment "that would limit congressional ex- In any flscal to Hie cfttlmaled recelpjj of Ih'o government tor that fiscal yew." OAKLAND win Knight today urged Hit fpdoral government to .Iwth a syprtpiri of. rapid dition tor tho cities and pensions for the Jn.Ti upcech before the LalM Hrcaltfiisk Club hern, Knight It WM' tho pnnslbillty" of the tederftl government to "protect urban areas >from traffic Htrangulii- Won." Ln-tcr in the day, Knight at Hit Jewish Community Cen- ter lor Senior Citizens In Berkeley that tie "looked for- ward1' to the time when the federal government will "vir. timllj replace the necessity for a state uniRtMice for the aged. I NEWSPAPER iNEWSPA'PERr   

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