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Marysville Yuba City Appeal Democrat: Thursday, October 12, 1995 - Page 1

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   Appeal-Democrat (Newspaper) - October 12, 1995, Marysville-Yuba City, California                                 Yuba City High hosts Farm Day  Community, Page C1  THURSDAY  ► Bingo embezzler sent to prison  Community, Page C1  ► Indians tie series; Braves win  Sports, Page B1  -CL  msmssssà  GOOD MORNING  Yuba-Sutter will be mostly sunny with gusty winds. High:8l Low:49  Weather details on A6  October 12,1995  Marysville-Yuba City, California  Single copy 471 + tax  City's Panel OKs Medicare cuts  request denied  Republican plan heads for House vote  Annexation plan rejected  Harold Kruger  Appeal-Democrat  Marysville's annexation dreams for District 10 were dashed again Wednesday.  Yuba County's Local Agency Formation Commission declined to reconsider its August rejection of the city's request to annex 296 acres in District 10.  The city now has to wait at least a year before it petitions the commission again for the District 10 property.  City officials last month submitted a revised annexation plan for 66 acres, but the panel took no action on that proposal.  None of the three commissioners who rejected the annexation plan in August — Mimi Mathews, Brent Hastey and Art Aseltine — asked that it be reconsidered.  Aseltine was absent. His substitute, Roger Shelton, said nothing.  "It was my understanding, and I was surprised that we were going to reconsider this this evening," Mathews said. "It was my understanding that once a project was turned down, you cannot come back to LAFCO for a whole year."  Reaction from city officials ranged from bewilderment to outrage.  "I'm a little startled," said City Administrator Alan Bengyel.  Councilman Ron Gless attacked the commission's decision as "utterly disgusting" and a message against growth in Marysville and Yuba County.  "I'm not for houses, but I'm for controlled industry and commercial growth," Gless said. "These people don't want to do anything. If they want it to be Mayberry, let's see if we can reinvent the cast of Mayberry and film it right here."  Mayor Jim Kitchen said he thought any of the five LAFCO commissioners could seek reconsideration.  "I was surprised, and essentially we will wait a year," Kitchen said. "We will wait a year and see what the people want. As long as they want to be annexed, we will come back in a year."  Supervisor Jay Palmquist, who represents the city, was pleased with the commission's action.  "I think this is the best thing that could have happened to Marysville at this time," Palmquist said. "Even if the idea was right, the timing was wrong. There are things coming up that will benefit the city a lot more than what they want to do (in District 10.)"  David Espo  Associated Press  WASHINGTON - Over vociferous Democratic opposition, House Republicans muscled legislation through committee on Wednesday that would squeeze  $270 billion from Medicare over seven years while expanding health care choices for the elderly.  The vote in the House Ways and Means Committee was 22-14, with all GOP members of the  panel embracing the bill and all Democrats opposed.  Action in a second committee was briefly interrupted by a demonstration staged by elderly activists of a labor-backed organization, an incident that under  scored the passions stirred by the legislation.  House Speaker Newt Gingrich is expected to bring the measure to a vote in the full Flouse next week. A similar bill is pending in the Senate. President Clinton has threatened a veto.  Capping a contentious three-day debate in the Ways and Means Committee that he chairs,  Rep. Bill Archer of Texas said Republicans had "kept our word" and devised a plan that assures Medicare's solvency for current senior citizens and "for those who will become senior citizens."  "They're using our seniors to Turn to CUTS /A6  O.J. has second thoughts about interview  Simpson says his attorneys warned he was 'being set up'  Bill Carter  New York Times News Service  In his first detailed interview since his acquittal on murder charges last week, O.J. Simpson said Wednesday that he had pulled out of a television interview with NBC News, scheduled for Wednesday night, because his lawyers had convinced him that answering questions about the case might make it more difficult to defend himself in civil lawsuits that he still faces.  Simpson also described his life and emotions in the eight days since he was declared not guilty in a Los Angeles courtroom, and spoke of his current financial status, his relationship with his children and the state of his public image.  In a 45-minute telephone interview with The New York Times, Simpson said, among other things, that he had been wrong to "get physical" with his wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, in 1989 and was now willing to meet with "battered women" to "talk about my relationship."  He also said that his trial had not left him financially wrecked, that he was "on the same page" with his wife's family about current arrangements for custody of their two children, that the "race deck" that came to play so significant a role in his trial "was supplied by the media."  He said he had fielded offers from both American and foreign media companies to sell aspects of his story, that he was willing at any time to "sit and debate" the case with the lead prosecutor, Marcia Clark, and that he was confident he would find a job.  "I've always found a way," Simpson said. "I'm an American. I should have a right to find a job and support my family."  Simpson initiated the interview, telephoning The Times without notice early Wednesday afternoon. He said he wanted to explain his decision to back out of the television interview, which had been expected to be one of the most widely watched broadcasts in history.  He also discussed the murder case in general terms, and its aftermath, but did not address the unanswered questions that still surround the murder of his former wife, except to insist on his innocence.  Associated Press  Kwame Fosu, right, argues with Alexandra Wisse, who carries a sign protesting NBC's scheduled interview with O.J. Simpson outside NBC-TV's Today show studio in Rockefeller Center.  "I am an innocent man," Simpson said.  Simpson said that he never intended the NBC interview to be a forum to declare his innocence. "The jury did that for me in the strongest possible terms: a verdict in three hours," he said.  But, he added, "I know there are a lot of minds that I'm not going to change."  Still, he questioned figures suggesting that up to 70 percent of the public is convinced of his guilt.  Simpson cited numerous examples of what he labeled "outright distortion" by the "so-called responsible media." These included a report on CNN Wednesday that the NBC interview had fallen through because Simpson's lawyers insisted on receiving the questions in advance. "That never happened," he  said, "but CNN said it did."  Simpson described himself as "fired up" about the outcome of the planned interview with NBC, but in most respects he was affable and personable, even laughing about reports that his legal bills had left him broke.  "Not yet they haven't," he said. "I still have my Ferrari, I still have my Bentley, I still have my home in Brentwood and my apartment in New York."  Simpson said he had intended to use the television interview to combat what he called "ludicrous misrepresentations" in the media, of both the details of his case and his life in the days since his acquittal last week in the murders of his ex-wife and her friend Ronald Goldman.  Simpson said he had expected to go on NBC Wednesday night and "talk  about aspects of my case, about how I felt about the jurors, and Marcia Clark, and what's going on between Johnnie Cochran and Bob Shapiro."  But he said he felt compelled to pull out after extensive consultation with his team of nine lawyers, including a new attorney, Bob Baker, brought in to deal with the civil suits for wrongful death that he faces from the Goldman and Brown families.  Simpson said he had been told he would have to give a deposition in the civil suits and that he had been informed that NBC had contacted the lawyers in those suits seeking questions to ask him in the interview.  "My lawyers told me I was being set up," he said. "They felt the interview was going to be tantamount to a grand jury hearing."  Perot's registration drive falling short, state says  Doug Willis  Associated Press  SACRAMENTO - Ross Perot's supporters so far have filed just 448 of the 89,007 registrations they need to place his Reform Party on the California presidential ballot, the state's top election officer said Wednesday.  However, Perot forces are planning a major effort this weekend to register thousands of Californians before the Oct. 24 deadline to qualify for next year's ballot.  Secretary of State Bill Jones said it was too early to predict  Perot would fail. He said his office had just provided Perot's campaign with 1 million voter registration forms, most of which the party plans to distribute as inserts in California newspapers on Friday.  "Mr. Perot has shown the ability to motivate people before," Jones said. "But it is a short time frame."  Russ Verney, national executive director of Perot's "United We Stand America" organization, said Jones' survey of 58 county  Turn to PEROT /A6  INDEX     Classified    D1      Comics    D6      Community.    C1      Crosswords    C4      Entertainment    C5      Features    C4      Finance    B5      Life    C6      Markets    B5      Obituaries    C2      Opinion    A4      Sports    B1      Television Log    C4      Vitals/Lottery    C2      Weather    A6     Ï  A Freedom Newspaper Vol. 135, No. 77 1530 Ellis Lake Drive Marysville, Calif. 95901 741-2345  Riverside man up for local ag post  Jean-Pierre Cativlela  Appeal-Democrat  A Riverside man has emerged as the leading candidate for Sutter County's top agriculture post, vacant since Stacy Carlsen's mid-June departure.  Mark Quisenberry, a deputy agricultural commissioner in Riverside County for nine years and an employee of that office for 15 years, will visit Sutter County on Friday and Saturday.  Quisenberry has not been formally offered the job, but is the "top candidate for appointment," Sutter County Administrator Larry Combs said Wednesday.  Quisenberry will tour the area  and meet local officials, after which both sides are expected to again discuss the hiring.  Sutter supervisors and the Yuba-Sutter Farm Bureau have invited growers and members to meet Quisenberry at the farm bureau office, 475 Palora Ave., on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.  Combs said supervisors, who interviewed four candidates, have been cautious.  "We want to get someone well-suited to the area," Combs said. "We're hoping they'll stay for a long, long time."  Quisenberry voiced a similar attitude.  "I remember the rural roots I  grew up in," he said. "I'd like to bring up my family in that kind of atmosphere."  Quisenberry lives in Nuevo, an unincorporated area of Riverside County, with his wife, Jan — a teacher educated at the University of California, Davis — and two daughters, ages 6 and 8. He also holds a bachelor's degree from UC Davis, in agricultural science and management.  Born in La Jolla, Quisenberry grew up near Riverside, where he attended high school.  While the main crops in Riverside County's subtropical climate include grapes and avocados, Quisenberry said he's familiar with Sutter County's top crops.  »   

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