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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 6, 1961 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 6, 1961, Long Beach, California                             Wading the Hard Way for Boston Sea Party IT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE only a Wade in the ocean, but a wave of enthusiasm enveloped Mayor Edwin Wade and he really got into the swim of things this morning at the foot of Linden Avenue. The mayor ov'Rowr Coir was seeking a canteen-full of ocean water to carry to Boston for Saturday's commissioning of the million'cruiser USS Long Beach, the nation's first nuclear-powered surface craft OFFER BY GM AVERTS DAW WO U.S. to Resume A-Tests, Avoid Fallout Danger Bv Associated Press U. S. nuclear testing starts again this der safeguards against the radioactive fallout in response to the three Soviet blasts in the past week which broke a'three.-year ban. "We have no other President Kennedy said Tuesday in announcing that trials will be resumed underground and in laboratories, where the debris oi death will not be released to mankind. of Dallas Quiet in Schools Integration .DALLAS UP) Eighteen Negro first "graders walked into classes in eight pre- viously all-white schools to- day without incident as Dal- las integrated its school sys- tem for the first time. Police, with 750 men pre- pared to handle any possible demonstrations after two years of training for today's integration, occupied them- selves with directing traffic. School Supt. W. T. White announced 15 minutes after classes opened that all 18 Ne- groes assigned to previously white schools were inside the schools. WHITE SAID no incidents occurred. In Galveston, Tex., 37 Ne- (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) School Bus With 28 Falls Down Bank PULASKI, Va. (UPI) A school bus carrying 27 chil- dren to their first day of classes' ran off a mountain road and embankment today. A number of the children were taken to hospitals but none was reported hurt se- riously. The children were en route to schools from their homes in the Little Creek commu- nity in this mountainous Southwest Virginia area. About half of the children were taken to the Pulaski Hospital and the other halfj to the Radford Community! Hospital at Radford. Bus driver Howard Stevens, 18, was the most seriously By way of contrast, the three Russian explosions in the atmosphere already are beginning to register in creases in radioactivity levels in Japan. Effects were expect ed to appear on the American West Coast perhaps today certainly by Friday. Kennedy's decision, reluc tantly taken only after he re ceived news of the thirc Soviet test, was unanimously applauded by Congress mem bers commenting on it. Th jeneral tone was that "w Slave already walked the las mile" in efforts to reach workable and saf eguarde agreement with Russia for permanent ban, and the tim (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1 Appointment n Loan Firm !ase Invalid U. S. Court Rules Hearing Officer Improperly Named SAN FRANCISCO UP) The U.. S. Court of Appeals oday ruled that the examin- ng officer in the Long Beach iavings and Loan Association :ase was not.validly appoint- ed to hear charges of mis- management of the mil- ion-firm. The Federal Home Loan iank Board appointed Rob- ert N. Hislop as hearing ex- aminer on June 3, 1960. Hislop's appointment fol- iowed the board's appoint- ment of a conservator of the association to handle its af- :airs, pending the hearings HOME The Finetl Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 6, 1961 Vol. 187 52 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 EDITION [Six Editions Daily) the board's charges of and unsound opera- unsafe tions. THE ASSOCIATION'S of- ficers accused Federal Home Loan Bank Board members of being prejudiced and biased. The association, on Nov. 18, 1960, obtained from' Fed- (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) Control Fire at Lacuna, SaveHomes A fire which has black- ened 450 acres of bjgush-cov- ered hillsides and canyons at Laguan Beach was reported contained this .morning with no structures destroyed. Containment of the two re- maining major fires in Cali- fornia also was hoped for to- day as an army of men mopped up after 250 blazes that flared throughout the the Labor Day Two Bellflower Tots Smother in Icebox state over weekend. The Laguna blaze, which started Tuesday on a hillside above Canyon Acres Drive in Laguna Canyon, blazed out of control through the night, threatening expensive homes in I.aguna's Temple Hills sec- tion. BY DAYBREAK, however, nearly 400 men, nine Marine Corps helicopters and heavy tractors were on the line. The aircraft used borate solution to bomb hot spots BELLFLOWER Twoi youngsters who climbed into a refrigerator which their mother was defrosting suffo- cated here Tuesday afternoon. hurt with cuts on his and an injury to his hand right After a four-hour search, the children's father found the bodies of Paul Thomas Cromwell Jr., 7, and his sister Joy Hope, 5, both of 9630 Alondra Blvd., crammed tight- y into the refrigerator, which was equipped with an auto- matic closing door. THE PARENTS, Paul Thomas Cromwell Sr., 26, and his wife, Joyce, 23, were treated for shock at St. Hel- en's Hospital, Bellflower, anc released two hours later. Five hours after the chil- dren were found, sheriff's deputies cited a Bellflower second-hand-goods dealer for leaving five refrigerators un secured in front of his place of business. Harold A. Sing er, 53, owner of the firm a 9228 Artesia St., was fine today by Judge John C Landis in Los Cerritos Mu nicipal Court. Mrs. Cromwell told sheriff deputies she put the two chil dren into the backyard to pla; thigh, a Radford hospital spokesman said. Fifteen ambulances rushed the children to.the hospitals for precautionary examii tions. as she prepared to bathe th couple's only, other child Terri, 3. At this time, she said, sh disconnected the 5-foot up right refrigerator and too out the shelves to defrost i ANNOUNCE STRIKE POSTPONEMENT Deadline for a strike by the United Auto Workers against General Motors has been postponed from today until 10 a. m. Monday, it was announced this morning at separate press conferences held by Louis G. Seaton vice president of General Motors, and Walter Reuther, president of MRS. CROMWELL told eputies she missed the chil- ren at 10 a.m. Shortly he- ore noon, she summoned the id of deputies from the -akewood sheriff's office and patrol car searched the eighborhood. In the meantime, a friend lad driven her to the machine hop where her husband worked and he returned home with them to help in the icarch. COUNTY RESCUE units, :1 from Paramount and 20 rom Norwalk, gave artificial resuscitation until a private ambulance took the children ,o the hospital with oxygen masks strapped to their fares. "We found the children's jodies on.the floor in front of the refrigerator when we Fire Capt. Jack L. Baker said. "Even though we applied artificial respiration, it's my opinion that they were dead then." The father collapsed as the ambulance bearing the bodies of his youngsters drove off. The rescue units gave him oxygen, summoned another ambulance and sent the two parents to the hospital. They were released at p.. m. and were standing by to stem any further break- throughs. State Division of Forestry men and state prisoners (Continued Page A-4, Col. 4) Four Guard Units to Be Put on Alert WASHINGTON defense Department was re- ported ready today to alert 'our National Guard divisions and more than 400 guard and reserve support units for pos- sible service in the Berlin Actor Leo Carrillo Near Death SANTA MONICA Actor Leo Carrillo, a descend- ent of the Spanish Dons, to- day was reported near death by his doctor. He has been 11 for several months. Carrillo, who major abdominal POLICE CALLED IN The family was in process of moving into the the Bellflower home mount from Para- crisis. The plan, was said to involve guard divisions in Massachu- Wisconsin and Pennsyl- vania, and an armored guard division in Texas. Pending a" decision on whether they actually will be called to active duty, the units will receive additional men, weapons and training. A total of guards- men and reservists, most of them in support units, was said to be involved. On Aug. 25, reserv- ists were-ordered to report for active duty beginning Oct. 1 in the military buildup from 2.5 million to million men. underwent surgery in 959, was ordered to his bed n July by Dr. Adolph Kosky. Kosky also revealed .for the 'irst time that Carrilio cele- brated his 81st birthday Aug. 6. ALTHOUGH the nature o Carrillo's ailment had no been disclosed following hi. operation, it was generall> known that he was sufferin; from cancer. Kosky said tha recently Can-olio's heart alsi had "gone bad." The actor, a member of pioneer California family an whose great-great grandfathe was a provisional governor o the state, had given variou ages during his lengthy caree nearly 2.751 and was believed muc younger than 81. in Riot Over New Church Head KANSAS CITY, Mo. convention of Baptists, disagreeing over the choice of one of heir number for president of the group, erupted into a >rawl today and police riot squads were called to quell ;he disturbance. Agreement Reached m (ey Issues Pattern Believed: Established for Big 3 Contracts DETROIT United uto Workers called off their reatened strike against eneral Motors Corp. today :ter top-level contract nego- ators announced, seven ours before a 10 a.m. dead- ne, they have reached ''an greement in principle" on ey issues. Terms of the GM-UAW greement are expected ..to stablish a pattern for tha ther members of the big and Chrysler. GM and the union agreed extend the strike deadline ntil 10 a.m. Monday after aking what UAW President Valter P. Reuther and other ources termed "substantial rogress" during the night argaining session. I THE ANNOUNCEMENTS mpact was felt immediately at Ford and Chrysler. FcJrd and the UAW agreed to ex- end their contract one midnight Sept. and continue it on a 48-hojjfs ermination basis after that, M. M. Cummings, Ford's director of industrial rela- tions, said the extension was decided upon "to wait and see what happens at GM." Chrysler-UAW negotiator! (Continued Page A-4, Col. 6) WHERE TO FIND IT Increased activity at the Nevada test site near Las Ve- gas indicates the United States could be ready to set off an underground nuclear blast within a month. Story on Page A-3. In a fist-swinging ex- hange near the speaker's jlatform at Municipal Audi- orium, one delegate was in- ured and another suffered what appeared to be a heart attack. Police had to use black- acks and night sticks to re- store order. A total of 80 of- icers, some armed with shotguns, were called off Brooklyn, N. Y., a their beats when a riot call was sounded. SOME SEMBLANCE ol tranquility was restorec shortly after 11 a.m., a ful hour after the fight started The tension was eased as the lunch hour approached anc gospel singer took th< platform to render severa hymns. The fighting began when nominations for presiden were .called for from the plat form. It was the second day f a 6-day annual meeting of he National Baptist Conven- ion, U. S., Inc. The huge auditorium be ame a bedlam of noise with ome delegates booing, ihanting and cheering. A delegation surrounded lev. Gardner Taylor of candidate or president, and moved to he platform. Rev. J. H. Jackson of Chi cago, the other contestant fo .he presidency, was on th platform at the time. His fac ;ion members rose in a bod to stop the Taylor grou when they approached th podium. When the group starte up a wooden staircase to th platform, several delegate leaped from their seats an began throwing punches. Beach B-l. Hal C-ll. C-8. D-4to 10. C-12. B-ll. Death B-2.. C-10. B-3. Shipping A-H. D-l to 4. C-4. TV, C-14. Tides, Vital B-1Z C-ll. C-ll. C-6, 7, Weather 1 Mostly sunny Thurs-i day but local fog and low clouds along coast, in- creasing and spreading farther inland tonight and early Thursday. Cooler. Maximum perature by noon today: 79 degrees.   

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