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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: November 27, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - November 27, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Cfiino Reefs Kidnap, Beat Calif. Marine U. S. Guard Rescued by India Police Tries to Recover Tape Recording of Commie Defector BOMBAY, India (UPI) The U.S. consulate general reported today that U.S. Marine Sgt. Robert Armstrong was seized by the Chinese Communists and beaten during five hours as a prisoner in the Red Chinese consulate. Armstrong, of Martinez, Calif., assigned to the con- sulate general staff, finally was rescued by Indian police after a complaint was lodged by the U.S. consulate general. A consulate general official said in a statement issued to- night that Armstrong was held for five hours in the Chinese Communist consulate garage and beaten with his hands tied behind his back. AFTER HIS RELEASE, the bruised Armstrong was taken to the consulate general hous- ing area called "Lincoln about a half mile from the Red consulate building. Armstrong's beating came as a sequel to the action of a Communist Chinese consulate official who defected and asked the U. S. consulate gen- eral here for political asylum. In Washington, the State Department said Armstrong had been kidnaped while guarding the Communist Chi- nese official. V OFFICIALS HERE identi- fied the defector as Chang Chien-yuh. Me apparently sought asy- lum with the Americans first and then changed his mind. Me had made a statement about his views on a tape re- corder and apparently took that back with him when he returned to the Communist consulate general. Armstrong followed, think- ing Chang had stolen the tape recording, and apparently was attempting to recover it. WHEN ARMSTRONG en- tered the gate of the Chinese Communist consulate general (Continued Page A-6, Col. 5) Falls, Kills Mass. Girl ATTLEBORO, Mass. A 14-year-old Foxboro girl died today of head injuries she suffered when struck by a metal goalpost uprooted in a celebration at the end of a Thanksgiving Day high school football game. James Puffer, the daughter of Mrs. Marie L. Puffer, suf- fered a six-inch gash, a skull fracture and brain injury, when struck at the Foxboro town playground. ANTHI. S. MOB STORMS JAPAN PARLIAMENT 'GENSUS1 PAYS DOPE'S PRICE THE GIRL was one of a big crowd watching several ex- uberant boys tug and pull at the metal goalposts after Mansfield High defeated Fox- boro High. Suddenly, the post was pulled free from its concrete- encased sleeve and it went crashing down on the Puffer girl. She had been standing in a crowd but no one else was hurt. WHERE TO FIND IT The governor of Baja Cali- fornia reveals his hopes anc aspirations for his people in matters of industry, agricul- ture and general prosperity. Page A-3. Beach B-l. Hal B-7. B-7. D-2 to 10. C-6, 7. D-2. Death B-2. B-6. B-3. Shipping D-2. C-l to 4. C-5. Tides, TV, C-8. Vital D-2. B-8, 9. Your A-2. The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER Vol. LXXII-No. 256 __________ TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 PKIC13 10 CENTS 36 PAGES CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Film Fame in Tatters, Haunts Empty Mansion ACTOR JAY ROBINSON... Sits Alone Among His Souvenirs HOLLYWOOD lywood's forgotten man sat on the bare floor of his big, empty mansion. Jay Rob- inson was alone with the posters of his past. Not long ago filmland called him a genius. He made a week then. Friends and rich fur- nishings filled the house. There was laughter and music. HIS LIFE may well have rivalled that of the Em- peror Caligula, whom he played in "The Robe." He was also a featured actor in "Demetrius." But on Thanks giving Day, at 29, he was left with his memories. Last June he was con- victed of sale and posses- sion of narcotics. He in- sists he was innocent and has appealed the case. "But since then I haven't been able to get he said. His Thanksgiving guests dropped in by accident. A telephone operator said he dialed her Thursday, then stopped talking in mid- sentence. She called police and firemen. They found the great rooms empty except for a Liz Taylor Stricken by Pneumonia Health Unit in New Warning on Tobacco WASHINGTON Public Health Service has issued a strong new warning on tobacco: the weight of evidence implicates smoking as the main cause of the rising rate of lung cancer. The statement was issued Thursday by Surgeon General Leroy E. Burney in the form of an article in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. It was the government's strongest statement to date linking smoking and cancer, and Burney said it was based partly on new evidence. Burney's warning immedi- ately was attacked by tobac- co interests as a warmed-over rehash of old statistics. DR. C. C. LITTLE, scientific director of the Tobacco In dustry Research Committee, said in New York the points in Burney's article were "first advanced some years ago in statistical studies that admit- tedly are not supported by ex- perimental evidence." And at Appomattox, Va., Rep. Watkins Abbitt (D-Va) who represents a major tobac- co growing district, said, "II is shocking that a supposedly responsible government offi- cial would castigate the entire (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) NEW YORK Actress Elizabeth Taylor is suffering from a virus-type of double pneumonia, course of which is unpredictable, a hospital spokesman said today. "It could last three days, or three weeks, depending on how it the spokes- man said. Her present condi- tion was reported satisfac- tory. Miss Taylor entered Hark- ncss Pavilion of Columbia- Presbyterian Medical Center Thursday, after trying to fight off a persistent cough for the past two weeks. Hospital officials said Miss Taylor, wife of singer Eddie Fisher, would not be allowed to receive visitors or tele- phone calls. box springs and mattress on a bedroom floor. A lamp stood beside the mattress, a bath towel for a shade. He has been selling his furniture. "I sold the last thing Wednesday, a he said. He pulled a few bills and some change out from under the mattress, which had jelly rolls and potato chips on it. "This is he said. HE'S ABOUT to lose the house, he said. He is three months behind on the pay- ments. However, Robinson said he didn't know wheth- er his father, a wealthy shirt manufacturer, will come to the rescue. He opened a closet door and said: "I hit my peak at 23.' In the closet were a few scripts, several photo- graphs, some reviews and posters. "Thai's what's left of my Robinson said. 900 Battle Devastating Tahoe Blaze Chemical Assault in Vain; Acres Blackened NEVADA CITY, Calif. Crackling flames in the Sierra Nevada swept on today .hrough bone-dry timber of Tahoe National Forest. More than 900 men, a heli copter and seven tanker planes dropping quenching bombs of morale solution fought in vain to whip the blaze Thursday. Black devastation spread over almost acres, much of it prime timber. THE FIRE, 4 miles north- east of Washington and miles south of Graniteville, moved west Thursday night. The wind lulled during the night. The towns were not believed endangered. No serious ported. Cause of the broke out Wednesday in a logging area is being investi- gated. injury was re- blaze which 416 Injured in Riotous Upheaval 'Human Wedge' Drives Through Police Barricade TOKYO of leftist demonstrators smashed through a police barricade and stormed the Japanese Diet (Parliament today in protest against the revision of the United States Japan security treaty. Unofficial reports indicated at least 416 persons injured Police indicated at least 31 policemen and an undisclosed number of demonstrators were hospitalized. An estimated to 7.00C demonstrators formed a hu man wedge to drive througl the police barricade am smash down a portion of huge steel gale around thi diet compound. The opposition Socialis Party, which has been bitterlj opposing the treaty revision issued a statement expressing "regret" that the demonstra tors had entered the Diet com pound. POLICE FINALLY battlec the mob back and by earlj evening it. had dwindled t about milling aroun the edge of the compound. Most of those remainin were students who continue to sing and shout slogans op posing the treaty revision. The Tokyo demonstratio was one of a series to nation (Continued Page A-6, Col. 4) Hungary Executions Continue, U. N. Told UNITED NATIONS Leslie Munro o New Zealand, special U. N. representative on the Hun garian question, reported today that trials and execu tions resulting from the 1956 freedom revolt in Hun gary still are being carried out. formal report Munro, in a to the General Assembly, said Russian troops remained in the country with an assur- ance by Hungarian Prime Minister Janos Kadar that "the time will come when Soviet troops will be with- drawn." Both the Hungarian and Soviet authorities, Munro said, had refused him permis- sion to visit Hungary in his capacity as a U. N. repre- sentative and had returned his correspondence to Secre- tary-General Dag Hammarsk- jold without reply. "THAT THE PRESENT re- port continues the theme of previous reports is entirely the responsibility of the Hun garian Munn said. "No response has beei forthcoming such as may rea sonably be expected of a member of the U. N. organi zation concerned to promot the purposes of the organiza (Continued Page A-6, Col. 5) Weather Clear tonight and clear and sunny Satur- day. Continued warm. Max imum temperature by noon .today: 78. ITS OUT Of SEASON, It's warm in Long Beach and although the beach season is past, Mike Gibson, 20 months, seems to be considering a dip in the ocean at Belmont is, if he can escape the eye of his mother, Mrs. Nora Gibson, of Monterey Park. Long Beach was the hottest spot in the nation on by Ron Dresnik.) Winds Rip Fog Mask off Area Strong northeasterly winds ripped through Southern Call' fornia early today bringing clear skies and unrestricted visibility and sending small craft warnings flying from Santa Barbara to Newport Beach. Long Beach, which had the highest temperature in the nation degrees expected to cool to 84 degrees today, the U. Weather Bureau said. Forecast were sunny skies today and Saturday, with strong northeasterly winds 20 to 30 miles per hour at times below canyons diminishing this afternoon and tonight. Variable winds 5 to 15 miles per hours will continue off the coast today through Sat urday. IN THE FIVE-DAY forecast the Weather Bureau predict- ed a cooling trend on the coast, a warming trend in the interior and no precipitation. Despite the cooling trend, temperatures on the coast are expected to average 5 to 10 degrees above normal; in the interior, temperatures four to eight degrees above normal were forecast. Occasional high cloudiness was predicted for the moun- tain areas, with generally sunny skies today and Satur- day and a continued high fire danger. Strong gusty winds were to diminish tonight. Death Count ing on Long Holiday Bv Hie Associated Press The nation's extended Thanksgiving holiday week- end was marred by fatal traf- fic accidents. Whether the reason was un- usual weather or the Ameri- can tradition of staying close to home on this holiday, the death count was slow. Snow, sleet, powerful winds and rain raked many sections 'TWAS THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING And all through the house Princess was draggin'. A bit overweight, she is in a Northbrook, III., animal hospital for on a reducing diet. Princess is a dachshund, 7 years old and weighing 31 pounds. The veterinarian is keeping namrr of Princess' owner a Wirephoto.) of the country from Wednesday onward 6 p.m. when the count of deaths from un- usual causes began. The count will end at midnight Sunday. THE DEATH TOLL at 2 p.m. was 1C9 in traffic, 16 from fires and 36 miscel- laneous lor a total of 221. The Associated Press made a survey of fatalities during a recent four-day non-holiday period. Traffic deaths then totaled '133, fires 49 and 100 from miscellaneous causes. This totaled 582. Last year's four day Thanks- giving holiday produced 454 deaths involving automobiles, 54 in fires and 118 from mis- cellaneous causes. The National Safety Coun- cil did not. make an advance estimate of traffic deaths over Thanksgiving. This holiday, the NSC maintained, does not compare with other major holidays of the year when drinking and pleasant weath- er contribute to the death toll. Snfant Dies in Apartment House Fire ALBANY, N. Y. raced up the stairway of a downtown apartment building early today, killing an infant and injuring at least 13 other persons. Three were hospitalized, one with critical injuries. The identity of the infant, found in the wreckage, was not determined immediately. THE FLAMES apparently started in trash cans under stairs on the first floor and spread rapidly to the top of the four-story, brick building, fire officials said. Several of the injured, most of them children, jumped from the building. Isaac Tucker. 17, suffered a critical skull fracture when he jumped from a second- floor window. Firemen battled the ilamc.i in sub-freezing temperatures.   

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