Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: November 26, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Press Telegram

Location: Long Beach, California

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - November 26, 1959, Long Beach, California                             TOT FALLS OUT. MOM CAN'T STOP Oh, Baby IT his Freeway Tale Has Happy Ending CONSTANCE GABLER holds son, Grant, 11 months, who escaped with only bruises and scratches when "he fell out of her car on photo.) Dane, Fired OffU.NJob, Kills Himself NEW YORK Forme: Danish diplomat Povl Bang Jensen, missing since Monday was found dead of a gunsho wound in a heavily wooded park today. Detectives said he apparently killed himself. Bang-Jensen, 50, whose rei- ve n t anti-communism g o him fired last year as i senior political officer of the United Nations, reportedlj had been despondent ove this and possibly future job prospects. His body, lying face down was discovered in a park ir Queens, about a mile from Bang-Jensen's lake su home on Long Island. A .25-caliber Colt automatic was in his right hand, police said. In his pocket was letter addressed to his wife, Helen. It asked forgiveness and gave funeral instructions police said. t BANG-JENSEN created an international stir when he re- fused to give to the U.N. the names of Hungarian refugees he had questioned in connec- tion with the 1956 Hungarian uprising put down by Russia. His inquiry was in connection (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) Kiiauea Iki Volcano Comes fo Life Again VOLCANO, Hawaii Hawaii's Kiiauea Iki volcano fountain came to life again early today, sluggishly erupt- ing lava as high as 50 feet into the air. The fountain had been idle since last Saturday evening. Prior to that, Kiiauea Iki provided Hawaiian tourists and residents with a week- long spectacle, at one time shooting lava feet into the air. HOLIDAY FARE Rooster's Crow Is Prisoners' Delight DOTHAN, Ala. (UPI) Sheriff Alvin Davis said a rooster would be the main course at the county jail today because he had re- ceived so many complaints from prisoners about the rooster crowing before day- light. LOS ANGELES Eleven-m out h-o I d Grant Gabler tumbled out of his mother's car as she turned onto the Hollywood Free- way Wednesday. Mrs. Constance Gabler, 32, of North Hollywood did not notice he was missing until she was wedged in the heavy traffic. All she could do was keep driving to the next turnoff, two miles ahead. When she frantically raced back to the spot, she found her child safe in the arms of Virgil Valentine, 25, of Bell Gardens. From his truck behind her, Valentine saw the baby fall, stopped and scooped him up from the pavement. The child suffered bruises and a possible concussion. Conrad Sets Light-Plane Flight Mark EL PASO, Tex. Conrad, 56, a flying grand- father, set down here at a.m. today after shattering a 10-year-old distance record or light planes. Conrad, smiling and freshly shaven stepped from his blue- and-white craft at El Paso Airport showing almost no signs of fatigue after his trip from Casa- ilanca, Morocco. He was in the air 56 hours and 26 minutes. H i s original destination was Miami, but Conrad ob- viously felt so fresh he stretched his flight to El "aso. He said he still had a ;ood margin' of fuel when he anded. The grandfather hedge- lopped the mountains ap- proaching El Paso, followed a highway through the passes ind circled the field once jefore he landed. Planes rom El Paso Airport es- corted him in. He's Grateful for Ships That Pass in Night SAN DIEGO was night on a Navy destroyer 60 miles off the San Diego coast. Seaman William Archie Buie, 19, and seasick, lurchec To the rail just as the ship rolled. Buie, of Mulberry, Fla. fell overboard into the chilly inky waters of the Pacific. And so began 90 minutes of terror for the young sea man Monday night. "I CAME UP hollering and nobody heard the sailor said. "I kept yelling, 'help help, but the ship (the ATLAS FAILS IN The Southland's Finest Evening Neivspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, NOV. Vpl.UOCII-No.255 PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 1 76 PAGES CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Below-Zero Temperature in Wide Area Driving Hazardous in Colo., Wyoming in Storm's Wake By Associated Press Snow and arctic cold pro vided a wintry setting fo Thanksgiving Day over wid sections of the midcontinen and several northern borde states today. The cold followed a day ong snowstorm that rangei south and southeastwarc 'rom the northern Rockic nto the mid Mississippi Val ey and the north Atlanli Coast states. The mercury plunged to 1! below zero in Grand Forks D. International Falls rtinn., had a low of an Rawlings, Wyo., Denve recorded a chilly 20, a dro pf 40 degrees in 24 hours. Lander, Wyo., was blanket ed with 6 inches of snow Denver received more than inches. Light snow whitenec Chicago. THE STORM made driving hazardous in eastern Colo rado and southeastern Wyo ining. About 50 cars slid of U.S. Hwy. 287 south of Lara mie, Wyo., Wednesday nigh but none of the accidents wa serious. The new push of cole dropped temperatures 20 ti 30 degrees in the northern Rockies, about 15 degrees in the northern plains and abou 20 degrees in the Atlantic Coast area. WHERE TO FIND IT Mexico has been burning )oppy fields for four years. Second in series on "Baja California's Crusade." Page A-3. Beach B-l. C-19. D-14 to 18. D-6, 7. C-17. Death B-2. C-I8. Shipping D-13. C-l, 2, 3, 4. D-5. Tides, TV, C-20. C-19. D-8 to 12. Your A-2. destroyer Arnold J. Isbell) .vent on past." Buie remembered his traili- ng in boot camp. He re- moved his shoes and dun- ;arees and used them as i Makeshift life preserver. "The water was ice 5uie said. "I kept singing 'The Tennessee Waltz' as loud as could. It made me feel better." THEN HE SAW the lights of the destroyer Frank Knox. His yells were heard. Seaman Harold L. Martin, 20, a member of the de- stroyer's emergency rescue oarty, dived overboard and swam 30 yards to assist Buie. The destroyer and Buie re- :urned to San Diego Wednes- day night. If the second destroyer ladn't steamed by, the Navy said, Buie's absence wouldn't have been noticed for several hours. Plane Lost in Fog Lands on Highway VENTURA (fft A. pilot and three passengers in a light plane made a safe forced landing Wednesday night on Highway 118, nine miles southeast of the Ox nard-Ventura Airport. The Sheriff's Department said C. R. Holmes and his un- identified passengers were en route from Phoenix, Ariz. They were lost in a fog that blanketed the coast. The snow ivcre pushed and cold ai; by winds tha reached 50 mph. The snow covered wide sections of Montana, Nortl and South Dakota, Minnesota owa, Illinois, Indiana, Wis cousin and Michigan, into the nid-Mississippi Valley anc eastward along the Atlantic toast. In North Dakota, the fal up to 15 inches. Some schools closed as the fall got "icavier. AN ISOLATED storm dumped 7 inches of snow in irie County, in northwestern 'ennsylvania Wednesday. The snow and wind com- >ined to create serious driv- ng problems over most of the states. The Weather Bureau said he snow would fall from Iowa and northern Missouri east- vard through the southern reat Lakes into Ohio. Sleet or freezing rain will occur on he fringe of the snow and ain will fall southward into Arkansas, Kentucky and Ten- lessee. Weather Possible fog near the coast late tonight and early Friday. Mostly sunny Friday. Little change in temperature. Army Cuts Draft Call in January to WASHINGTON Army will draft men in January, a cut of from December's call. The new levy will bring to the number of men called up under the draft "s the start of the Korean in June 1950, the De- fense Department said Wed- nesday. Boat Warnings Up in Louisiana, Texas NEW ORLEANS Weather Bureau today or- dered small-craft warnings hoisted along parts of the Louisiana and Texas coast. Prayer, Feasting, Fun for L. B. Thanksgiving THANKSGIVING TURKEYS come out of the oven at Long Beach City Jail for inspection by Lt. Howard H. Sweet chief jailer, and Harold Thrcet, the city's jail chef. Prisoners feast on 12 turkeys today. But there were no cranberries on the menu. Applesauce was photo.) Heavy Dew Helps Curb Tex. Fires MARSHALL, Tex. leavy dew in East Texas to- day curbed scores of grass ires that destroyed more than 40 homes Wednesday. But 'iremen feared new outbreaks during the day as the dew dried. Texas Forest Service of- icials counted 70 fires at one ime and laid the outbreaks o careless burning of leaves and trash. Firemen Even the Turks of Long ate cranberries today as the Southland gave thanks to a bountiful Thanksgiving Day 1960 by prayers, turkey feasting and celebrations. i There had been fears al damper might be put on Southland turkey feasting b; an earlier national cranberr; scare. Government scientists feared some cranberries hac been sprayed with a weec killer that causes cancer ir mice. So the next best thing to a real live turkey was surveyec today on this turkey-cran berry problem families and volunteers used backfires, wet sacks, ire trucks and bulldozers to Contain the flames. The Marshall Fire Depart- ment alone answered 36 calls. At least 15 grass fires were eported in Paris. s THE WORST outbreaks oc- urred in Northeast Texas, preading into Louisiana and Oklahoma, but flames also Authorities estimated dam- f thousands of dollars. The only death reported vas that of Mrs. B. Q. Adams Ir. who died of a heart attack rtiile fighting a grass fire. he lived in the Smyrna com- munity in extreme Northeast 'exas. et Sets Record f. to New York NEW YORK (UPI) An merican Airline jet Vednesday night set a new ommercial speed record of our hours, 22 minutes for a on-ston flight from San rancisco to New York, the irline said. Beach area phone directory Of the Turks called, more than half dabbed cranberry sauce on their 1960 turkey. MOST SAID they decided to slick by cranberries after local health officials gave a clean bill of health to cran- berries on the California market. Turkey also was served by military installations, jails and harbor area missions. :horal groups from Los An- geles Christian Endeavor serenaded patients at Long Seach General Hospital, Har- jor General Hospital and prang up in oilier parts of Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, he Lone Star State. There also was a heavy dash of fun on the Southland ge throughout the northeast Thanksgiving menu, including ection of Texas at hundreds quarter horse racing at Los Alamitos, the Santa Ana-Ful- erton College Thanksgiving Day game at Santa Ana Mu- nicipal Bowl, the Alfalfa Bowl Game at Lancaster and the Jardena Stadium Grand Prix. SPECIAL RELIGIOUS ivenls were held by Proles- ant, Catholic, Jewish and other faiths. All government offices, schools, the post office and most stores and businesses vere closed. Some employers, ncluding North American Aviation, arranged work schedules so employes also would be off his a four-day weekend. Fog Lifts and Gusty Wind Due Heavy fog rolled in over Southern California Wednes- day night, closing two air- ports and slowing ground, sea and air traffic. The U. S. Weather Bureau said that there was little chance of more fog tonight, forecaster said that a desert wind condition was de- veloping in the interior that would eliminate the fog ex- cept for small patches along the coast. Strong, gusty winds were expected in the foothills and Delow mountain passes late today, tonight and Friday. FOG CLOSED Long Beach Municipal Airport at D.m. Wednesday. Internation- al Airport was Closed a short time later. Commercial airliners were diverted to Ontario Interna- tional Airport and Lockheed Air Terminal in Burbank. Thirty-six airliners landed at the Ontario airport and an estimated passengers were put aboard buses and taken into Los Angeles. Some southbound planes rom San Francisco landed at Santa Barbara as the fog rolled in. Moscow Radio Again Urges Summit Meeting LONDON Soviet Jnion broke a week-long si- ence on plans for a summit conference today when Mos- cow Radio called for a heads of government meeting as soon as possible. The broadcast mentioned no dale but. said the Soviets still considered such a conference of the greatest importance. iece Breaks Off in First Failure to Orbit Satellite Bitter Blow to U. S.Hopes By HOWARD BENEDICT CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. most powerful rocket ver developed by this nation ailed on its maiden flight lo- ay and ruined a U. S. bid to mt the first satellite into or- lit around the moon. The giant Atlas-Able rocket hundered aloft exactly on chedule at a.m. atop it was a 372- lound payload designed for he lunar orbit. An hour after the launch, he National Aeronautics and Ipace Administration reported hat second-stage signals were ost 70 seconds after launch- ng and added: "There is no record of the econd stage having fired and we must presume that the sec- ond stage did not fire. "Visual observations were ;hat a piece fell off the rocket Apparently this was ibove the liquid oxygen tank on the Atlas' first stage." c. OBSERVERS saw a fiery chunk break loose from the rocket about 20 seconds after launch and spiral into the At- lantic Ocean. The remains of the rocket also fell into the ocean later. The failure was a bitter blow to U. S. hopes of jump- ing back into the space racs with Russia, which is recent weeks has scored spectdc- ilarly with ils Lunik If and II rockets. One smacked into he moon; the other whirled nto a wide orbit around the icon and earth and took tho rst pictures of the moon's ark side. There is no backup vehieia or tody's shot, so it prob- bly will be several months efore it can again be at- empled. ff THIS WAS the second ailure for an Atlas-Able cketed for a shot at tlia loon. On Sept. 24, another ne of the 10-story-high rock- ts blew up on its pad during static test of its engines. That rocket was set for an irly October launching. It had been successful, th'a lulled States would have eaten Russia to the first pic- ures of the moon's farside. he Soviets accomplished lis feat shortly after the cheduled American launch- ig in October. Today's ill-fated satellite arried a scanning device to ake crude pictures of the mar surface. It also con- dined instruments to study e moon's environment. A SUCCESSFUL orbit Continued Page A-6, Col. 4) ke, Family >ming on Turkey, too WASHINGTON It's aditional turkey for today's 'hite House Thanksgiving nner for President Eisen- owcr and his family. Traditional cranberries, 10? "I haven't the slightest Press Secretary James Hagerty told inquiring re- orters, and added- he had no tention of trying to find out hether cranberries would be ervcd. The President and his wife being joined for the holi- ay dinner by their son and aughter-injaw. Army Maj. nd Mrs. John Eisenhower, nd their four grandchildren. Eisenhower worked during 10 morning on speeches he 'ill make on his three-conti- ent good will mission start, ng a week from today.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication