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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: November 21, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - November 21, 1959, Long Beach, California                             EX-CHAMP MAX BAER STRICKEN, DIES AF Attempts Space Objec Gatch Today Discoverer VIII Eject Capsule Off West Coast VANDENBERG AIR FORC BASE, Calif. Fore crews make another stab to day at man's first mida catch of an object from spac capsule' hurled from satellite. On their the first Amer can venture of a human bein beyond the earth's atmos phere, .The 300-pound capsule wi be-ejected from the satellit Discoverer VIII which rocket ed -into orbit from this Wei 'Gbast base Friday. THE ORBIT that Discover er- .VIII followed around th earth upset the time schedul for the attempted catch. A a result the Air Force ad vanced the hour for the at tempt to about p.m. EST Planes took off from Hono lulu several hours in advanci of that time to fan over thi Pacific area for the effort ti snag the capsule as it wa; ejected on the satellite's 15th pass around the earth. tPrior to computations tha showed the orbit path had slowed down the -circuits ground the globe, plans hac called for ejection of the cap sule on the 17th orbit (be twe'en 7 and 8 p.m. FRUSTRATED on four ear Her attempts, Air Force offi cials said they will keep try jng until they clear this, hur dls. Once a catch is made the next logical step would be to- 'send a monkey up in a satellite, then try to bring him back alive. It's all intended to pave the for a man's round trip into orbit. The capsule is similar to that which would probably be used. The satellite is orbiting the (Continued Page A-3, Col. 4) 4 Students Drown as Boat Upsets GAINESVILLE, Fla. UP) Five students from a state school for the mentally re- tarded slipped away from a g'roiip of campers Friday night and went boat riding. Four drowned when the boat capsized. .A spokesman.at the Sun land Training Center said a group of three teenagers and two adults left their beds after lights out and set out on Lake Crystal near a camp about 25 miles from here. One of the teen- agers was rescued. THE LAST of the bodies recovered from water 15 to 20 feet deep early today. The school identified the victims as Noah Stanley. 15, of Apopka; Charles Griffith, 15, of Mount Dora; James Rewis, 31, of Jacksonville; and Thomas Elmore, 21, of Mariana. Clarence Armstrong, 17, of Highland View, was saved by 15-year-old Jimmy Roach, who was handling the boat. Train Barely Misses 80'Fr. Fall Into River BALNAGUARD, Scotland two-coach branch line railway train careened across a 45-foot chasm Friday with only sagging, unsupport- ed'rails keeping it from an 80- foot drop into a river. The train rolled onto the stretch of track just after a landslide had washed away the supports. It screeched safely across the sagging rails and cracked up on the other side. Engineer David Battison, fireman Michael McGroaty train guard Ronald Brown were slightly injured. PRECARIOUS PERCH Flatbed trailer of 10-wheel lumber truck hangs perilously over- Saco River at Biddleford, Maine, today after vehicle skidded off a Maine Turnpike bridge, sending cab plunging into 12 feet of water. One man was killed, another is sought. (AP) U. N. Asks Atom Ban During Geneva Talks UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. -Iff) The U. N. Gen- ral Assembly appealed to all countries today not to est nuclear weapons while talks are on for the con- rolled cessation of such tests. CAMPUS FUN It's Big Game Day of Course LOS ANGELES Hughes thought he'd do something nice for his school, the University of Southern California. So Friday he painted 200 mice red and Set them loose in the UCLA library. Sat back and watched coeds scream. Now it so happens that UCLA and USC, traditional rivals, clash in their annual football game today. And things like this happen dur- ing the week of Los An- geles' Big Game. To show their hearts were in the right place, the members of UCLA's school spirit club, Kelps, recipro- cated. They caught Hughes after he released the mice and carted him off to a fra- ternity House. Hpghes punishment: His scalp was shaved in the shape of a doughnut. And in the middle, the Kelps painted a blue C for California: Blue is UCLA's color. The roll-call vote was 60-1 in favor of a 24-nation Asian- African resolution on the sub- ject. The only "no" came from rancc, which plans to set off an atomic bomb in the Sahara early next year. Twenty countries abstained from voting. Among them were Britain and the United States, now discussing con trolled cessation of tests with the Soviet Union in Geneva. The Soviet Union voted "yes." SHORTLY the assembly adopted an Austri- an Japanese Swedish resolu tion urging the Big Three only to refrain from testing nuclear weapons. The vote was 78-0 with Afghanistan and France abstaining. Later the 82-nation body, in a 70-minute meeting, gave its unanmious consent to an In- dian-Yugoslav resolution de- ciding that the Disarmament Commission should continue to be composed of all 82 members of the U.N. The last Assembly had set up the commission in that form for this year only. Today's resolutions on dis- aramament -was the sixth on the subject that the Assem- bly had approved in two days recommended by its Political Committee. S. Urges U. N. Debate on Hungary UNITED NATIONS he United States today for- ally asked for a Unite-" Na- ons debate on Cotr. st ungary. U. S. Ambassador Henry abot Lodge, in a letter to ec.-Gen. Dag Hammarskjold, aid the United States sup orted the proposal of Sir eslie Munro, special U. N. presentative on the ques- on of Hungary, that this ear's assembly consider the ase. A U. S. spokesman said the ove for a new debate of the >56 revolution in Hungary nd its bloody suppression by oviet troops was made in opes it might help the Hun- arian people and possibly pen the way for Munro to et into Hungary for a first- and look. Bus Overturns, 25 Persons Hurt HOME The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24 PAGES s PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 Vol. 25! CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Lakewqod Wife Shoots Mate in Spat Jailed Woman She Was Beaten; Husband Critical A family argument erupted into gunfire at 3 toda; ,n Lakewood and a husband was wounded critically. Lakewood sheriff's officers ailed Barbara Ann Gebhart 21, for assault to murder her msband, Dean Lloyd Geb hart, 27, at their home, 6213 McKnight Dr. A .22-caliber rifle bullei struck him in the neck am ragments splintered into his spinal cord. HE IS IN critical condition at County psteopathic Hos pital, Los Angeles. Deputies Frank A. Handley and Richard E. Byrd saic VIrs. Gebhart told them she md her husband had spent rriday evening with her >rother, Bobbie Anderson, in Jellflower and that her hus- >and was drinking. As the result of an argu- ment, she said, they left anc en route home, she claimed le slapped her, accused her of being "sinful'' and then jeat her. about the face again ARRIVING HOME, sh led into the seized a 22-caliber rifle from its wal rack, got ammunition from desk drawer and ordered her msband to stay out of the louse. As he approached, the re port said, the rifle blastcc once and Gebhart fell bleed- ing. "Don't come in or I'll kil Mrs. Gebhart told her msband, officers said. As Gebhart fell, he mut :ered "I'm glad you did it.. I'm glad you did she claimed. Mexico 75 persons in- OAXACA, bus carrying eluding 58 children over- .urned near here Friday. Twenty-five persons were given first-aid treatment but no one was hurt seriously. 4 Teenagers Dies n Car-Pole Crash ELLENBURG, N. V. (UPI) teenagers were fatal- y. injured Friday night when :heir station wagon ran ofl :he road and struck a utility >ole and a tree. The force of the crash split he car in two, police said. Killed in the accident were }ary F. Labombard, 18, Mas- >ena; and Lester J. Tacy, 18, Morris W. Labombard, 15, and Gary Peets, 17, all of Menburg Center. 13 Kenya Children )ie in Road Crash MOMBASA, Kenya UP) Thirteen school children were killed and 21 injured in a road crash 10 miles from here Fri- day night. A truck taking the children home from a sports meeting in Mombasa brushed a stone-laden truck and the school vehicle careened off the road. Approved Cranberries Now on Sale in L B. "The Great Cranberry Cry" turned into a whisper in Long Beach Friday as stocks of certified berries were released to the public. The hushed words were: "You can buy cranberries because they now have labels certifying that they are not contaminated." The labels bear the official words: "NOW. Examined and passed by Federal Food and Drug Administration of the U. S. Department of Health and Welfare." MEANWHILE, Agriculture Secretary Ezra T. Benson said Friday it was "entirely possible" that Health Secre- tary Arthur S. Flemming could have protected the public against contaminated cranberries without touching off a widespread cancer scare." He quickly added that Flemming's Food and Drug Ad- ministration "had the facts, so they may have been justi- fied." He said it was up to Flemming to act if he thought there was danger and "I'm not prepared to judge." I GRILLED IN FARM TRAGEDY Alfred Mario (Pat) is being questioned by police at Troy, today after he was charged with slaying three' of his best friends on a farm near here Friday Wirephoto) Trio Killed on Farm by Lovesick Youth TROY, Mo. (ft) A young St. Louis laborer, brooding because his girl friend had broken off their romance, drove to a farm home Friday and shot to death three friends, officers said. Authorities said the 40 Injured as Trains HitinN.Y. NEW YORK Man lattan-bound subway train smashed into a baited work train early today in a Brook- yn tunnel. As many as 40 were re- )orted injured. However, Transit Authority police said only one was un dentified man with a possibly >roken leg. The three-car Seabeach lo cal crashed into the six-cai work train after leaving the !th Ave. station in the Bay Ridge section and about 'eet before it reached the 59th 5t. station. Police said it was moving about 20 m.p.h. The work train, with only hree persons aboard, had topped and let off repair- men to work on an adjacent rack. The collision occurred it the start of a tunnel. SINCE THE collision oc :urred on a Saturday morn ng, the train carried com- taratively few passengers. iVithin 30 minutes, they were ransferred from the train lo nother train that backed up o the last car. Then they vere taken back to the 8th we. station. The front wheels of the iassener train left the track. Transit Authority police aid all passeners had been emoved from the train with- 30 minutes after the col- (Continued Page A-3, Col. 5) WHERE TO FIND IT A-4, 5. B-4 to II. B-3. B-2. Death B-4. B-4. Shipping A-3. A-6, 7, 8. B-2. Tides, TV, B-I2. three victims apparently had noth ing to do with the broken romance and described the slayings as senseless. "All we can discern at the present time is that he went said Deputy Sheriff Jack Stewart. Charged with murder in each of the three slayings is Alfred Mario (Pat) Corradi, 18, who led officers to the scene of the slayings. A cous- in took Corradi to police in Jennings, a St. Louis suburb, after Corradi told him of the slayings. THE DEAD were Leroy Albert Kappel, 25, employe of a St. Loius stove manufac- turer; his wife, Mary Sue, 18, and her sister, Rosetta Willis, 17, of East Prairie, Mo. They were slain in the-small farm home the Kappels were re- modeling some 60 miles northwest of St. Louis. Mrs. Kappel was shot 16 times, her sister four times, (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1) 11 Children, 2 Adults Die in 4 Blazes Fatal Fires Sweep Homes During Nighl as Families Sleep Bv Associated Press Eleven children and two adults perished during the night in four separate fires :hat.struck their homes while they slept. Four brothers and sisters died in flames that swept :heir two bedrooms in Santa Fe, N. M. They were Chris- tine, Patrick, Rose Marie and Joseph Lury, aged 8, 4, 3 and 2. An uncle, Charles Lury, 19, imelled smoke and ran for help. Two sisters of the vic- ing, Josie, 10, and Anna Mae, 8, escaped and their grandfather, Robert Lury, 81, was saved by firemen. The mother, Vyn Lury, who was away at the time, told firemen the fire probably started in a'n automobile in a ;arage attached to the house. FIVE PERSONS, including three children, burned to death in a fire in a two-story nome in the Long Island town of Bay Shore, N. Y. The dead were Mrs. Bar bara Mayo, 25; her children Corinne, and William Jr 3 months; Catherine Fiske 11, a niece, and Mrs. Mayo's mother, Mrs. Catherine White, 59. Mrs. Mayo's husband, a ligh-school history teacher, discovered the fire, awakened the others, jumped out a win dow and called to the others to jump into his arms. But the roof collapsed, trapping the others. Mayo formerly lived in Lynn, Mass., and his wife in Danvers, Mass. Cause of the fire was not determined immediately. THREE SONS of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Balfour lost their lives and two others were in- jured in a fire in their home in Marcelline, 111. Dead were Michael, 16; Robert, 13; and David, 6. Ron- nie, 15, was in serious condi- tion and Richard, 11, in good condition, in a hospital. The parents were away when the fire broke out but returned as firemen sought to sring it under control. Fire men said the fire started in an overheated flue of a kitch en stove. In New York's Harlem, a tenement fire cost the life of Daniel Oliveria, 3. The fire, starting in a dumbwaiter shaft, forced 75 residents to the street. Heart Attack Suffered in L. A. Hotel Former Boxer, 50, Calls for Help but Collapses in Room HOLLYWOOD mer heavyweight champion Vlax Baer died today after, uffering an apparent heart attack while shaving in his lotel room. He died before he could be taken to the nearby Holly- wood Receiving Baer, 50, who won the leavyweight crown from Pri- mo Camera on June 14, 1934, called the hotel switchboard operator shortly after 8 a.m. :6 say he thought he had suf- 'ered -a heart attack. The house physician, Dr. Edward Koziol, was sum- 120 III, 1 Dead After Turkey at Vet Hospital DENVER After eating a turkey dinner, 120 employes of the U.S. Veterans Hospital jecame ill with food poison- ng Friday. One patient ate the meal and died but whether the turkey was a cause was not yet known. The meal_ was served Thursday at a hospital can- :een, under independent man- agement. None of those stricken was believed seriously ill. A hos- >ital spokesman said all were jack on the job sometime asked to participate. TESTS WERE started to determine definitely that the turkey was infected. Most of the stricken per- sons called to report their ill- ness early Friday, Dr. Engel said. The majority suffered only mildly, he diarrhea, vomiting and stom- ach cramps. Severe cases, however, can be fatal. Normally only visitors 'and employes of the hospital eat at the canteen. There is a separate dining hall for pa- tients. Reynold E. Clark, 30, of Denver, died Friday evening. le had been under treatment 'or a posible ulcer and lung condition. Dr. H. Martin Engle, hospital manager, said an autopsy would be per- 'ormed, and that Denver health authorities had been Weather Patchy night and early morning fog along coast; sunny Sunday with high clouds, slightly warmer Sunday. MAX BAER Complained of Pains he called for an ambulance. ik BAER, the one-time "Liver- more who had a ling in-the show world after iis' Lou Nova April 4, 1942, in New York seen by the televi- sion audience as recently as ast Wednesday. He refereed he televised heavyweight jout between Zora Folley and Alonzo Johnson in Phoenix. A son is a student at Santa lara-College near San Jose, and though powerfully built as was his father, he turned (Continued Page A-3, Col, 5) Ben Metrick Has Heart Attack, Dies Benjamin Metrick, 56, su- permarket and finance com. pany president, died in Long teach early today after suf- ering a heart attack in his ar. Metrick, of 131 Bay Shore Dr., suffered the attack at' 1 i.m. while his wife was driv- ng him home from a visit to he home of a daughter, Mrs. Bea Cuthbertson. Metrick was dead on arrival at a hospital minutes after the attack. Metrick, who headed Met- ick Food Center, Inc., and 'hrifty Finance Corp., came o Long Beach 10 years ago. He was past president of "emple Beth Sholom and was hairman of the temple's milding committee at tha ime of his death. HE RESIDED in Pasadena 3rior to coming to Long leach, and was a past presi- ent of the Pasadena Zionist District Metrick sold out two Long Beach units and six Coraptort units of his chain to Fox Mar- 
                            

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