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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - November 14, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Convair Man Rejects Pentagon Post cites Dispute TPtess on Conflict of Interest PRISON DOORS TO OPEN AFTER 25 YEARS Roger (The Terrible) Touhy Chicago gang boss during prohibition era, talks with Warden Joseph E. Ragen in Stateville Prison at Joliet, 111., Friday night after he had been granted a parole. Now 61, Touhy has spent a quar- ter century there for the 1933 kidnaping of John (Jake the Barber) Factor, now living in Beverly KNOCKS. GIVES MONEY TO POOR Youngish Santa on Job; His Pack Is His Wallet BALTIMORE weeks until Christmas but a Santa Claus already has doled out thousands of dol- lars to the poor folks of this city. He's not a jolly, plump man with a white beard, but a serious looking man of 27. He wears slacks, a black suit coat and blue denim shirt. Meat to Be Plentiful if Butchers Strike Union and management officials predicted today meat will continue to flow to Southland shoppers even if butchers strike Monday after a truce runs out. The reason: Stockpiles of frozen and canned meats in Southland markets, and the fact some independen: grocers are not involved in the bargaining betweer supermarket chains and union butchers and meat cutters. Collisions Kill 3, Put 2 in Jail Three persons died in traf- fic accidents in the Long Beach area late Friday and early today. A 67-year-old Long Beach woman was killed in a two- car crash Friday night in Signal Hill, and her daughter was jailed on suspicion of felony drunk driving. Two youths were killed early this morning and five persons injured in a three-car collision in the Carson area. The driver of one of the auto- mobiles was booked on suspicion of manslaughter, drunk driving and felony hit- MRS. MOLLIE DONEGAN, 67, of 2200 Cherry Ave., died ii. St. Mary's Hospital follow- ing' a crash at 23rd St. Cherry Ave. Her daughter, Mrs. Loraine Roberts, 43, ofj (Continued Page A-2, Col. 6) .The deadline for reaching an agreement with some Southland markets is mid night Sunday. Bargaining talks continued today. BUTCHERS and meat cut ters normally handle all fresh and frozen turkey supplier and other meats. But marke operators said they woulc sign supervisory personnel to handle Thanksgiving frozen turkeys this season if the strike comes off. Cannet meats already are on shelves, "If it is within our power, our customers will have tur- keys for (Thanksgiving) din- promised Robert K. Fox; president of the Food Employ- ers Council. "Our surveys show that there will be plenty of meat, whether or not there is a Harold Woodard, sec- retary of Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of Amer- ica Local 551, said in a state- ment. Weather Fog late tonight and early Sunday. Mostly sunny and little change in temperature. He asks just two ques- tions after he raps on a housewife's door: Are you poor? Will you use any money 1 give in the right way? f. C SOME WOMEN slammed the door in his face when he_ first went about his portal-to-portal altruism on Thursday. .But most quickly caught on when he pressed or into their hands and walked off. He handed out about Thursday and an undisclosed amount Friday, authorities said. Who is this mystery men? The people in crowded, run- down rowhouses are asking. He's Arthur Douglas Fos- ter III of suburban Glyn- don. He is single. Accord- ing to a friend, who asked not to be identified, Fos- ter inherited about 000 from a grandmother. Both his parents, who are divorced and remar- ried, are well-to-do. They tried to persuade the boy to give up his share-the- wealth plan, Foster admit- ed to a reporter Friday night. o t AT A LATE hour Foster hadn't shown up at his YMCA hotel room in down- Continued Page A-2, Col. 5) Red China Returns 10 Indians, 9 Bodies NEW DELHI, India W) ed China today turned over 10 captured Indian policemen and the bodies of 9 others tilled in a border clash last month, the Foreign Ministry announced. Details of the .urnover were not immediate- y available. The clash oc- curred in the Ladakh region of Kashmir, where Red China claims a large slice of terri- ory India regards as its own. Holifield Threat of Probe Factor in Critchfield Move SAN DIEGO vair physicist Charles Critch field turned down an appoin ment today to head a to Pentagon space agency pos The 49-year-old scicntisl who was chosen to head thi Advanced Research Project: Agency, said, "General mis understanding and public con troversy have most certainly impaired my ability to serve under present circumstances.' W ff HE OBVIOUSLY referred to a promise of investigation by Rep. Chet Holifield (D- Calif) of a possible conflict of interest. Under terms of Critchfield's appointment, he would have remained on a a year salary from Convair where he is director of scientific re- search. The cigar smoking, easy- going scientist said, "I do not believe I could do justice to this important job. 1 have therefore informed the de- partment I must withdraw ac- ceptance of my appointment as director of ARPA." Z CRITCHFIELD SAID his appointment was criticized in editorials carried by Wash- ington, D. C., newspapers which caused him to ask De< fence Secretary Neil McElroy to study the situation and advise him. However, the Defense De- partment said Friday in Washington its position was unchanged. A spokesman said: "Dr. Critchfield has been appointed, he is regard- ed as eminently qualified and we hope he will be able to accept." MASTER YOUR TENSIONS Work It Off or Talk It Over When You Feel Fits of Anger Cold Wave Rolls Into Dixieland Bv Associated Press A midwinter-s i z e d colt spell knifed deeper into th Midwest and South today aft er easing its hold on th storm-b altered northen Rockies. Cold wave warnings wen ssued for Tennessee am Kentucky as well as Indiana Ohio and lower Michigan. The snow storm, whicl juried sections of Montana n two feet of snow, dimin shed somewhat as it movec east and southward. But up o 15 inches covered Uppe Michigan and 7 inches blank eted western Illinois. 1': THE MERCURY tumbled to 22 below zero at Valentine in north central Nebraska breaking a record of 18 below set in 1891. Lemars, in north- western Iowa, had 24 below and it was 19 below at Rapic City, S.D. Subzero readings were general from Montana into Minnesota and Iowa anc throughout the northern hall of the plains. As the storm swept into the (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1959 20 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 Vol. 245 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) MURDER CLIMAXES RIFT OF ROOMMATES PREDICAMENT OF BABY CHARLIE Firemen at Elmira, N. Y., somehow manage to extricate 16-month-old Charlie Benjamin.from business end of his junior Chic Sale, but how it happened is a mystery. Mrs. Charles Benjamin (right) left her son seated properly in his nursery chair. When she returned to room, Charlie's head was trapped where his bottom should have been. Happy ending, of course. (AP Wirephoto) Robber Gets By GEORGE S. STEVENSON, M.D., and HARRY MILT (No. i ol Serin) Anger is normal. You use it to combat attack. If some- one strikes you, insults you, or treats you unfairly, you usually get angry and strike back in whatever way you can. But anger becomes a prob- lem when it is used without cause, gets out of control and becomes habitual. ONE MAJOR cause of such unreasonable anger is an ex- aggerated feeling of insecurity. This may be brought on by unusual stress, or it may be; a long-standing part of your character. Another is frustration. Your television breaks down in .the middle of a program. You want to go out on a date but nobody calls you. You'd like a new home, new furni- ture, new car, but your in- come makes this impossible. You may. react by lashing out at everything and every- body. Or you may develop a slow burn which keeps you in a constant state of dis- satisfaction. Whatever its cause, unrea- sonable anger can do great harm, to others as well as yourself. Anger, after it is spent, makes you feel foolish; for having made a spectacle of yourself; guilty for having at- tacked a helpless and blame- less person; worried that you have made another enemy. It makes you careless, forget- ful and inefficient. Anger causes many accidents. And finally, it makes you just plain unhappy and tense. MRS. L. WOULD have scratched the eyes out of any- one who dared lay a hand on her children. Yet she herself could not keep her hands off I (Continued Page A-2, Col. 2) 2 Cars Collide, 4 Persons Killed HANOVER, Pa. Four persons were killed Friday night in a Iwo-car collision a mile outside town. Police said one car, travel- ing at a high rate of speed on the Hanover-Littlestown road, spun around on a wet pave- ment. Its rear end smashed into the front of the other vehicle. AH the victims were in the latter car and all were ..from Litlleslown. They were Harry and Helene Bowers, both 61; Mrs. Alma Tressler, 68, and Lilly Harner, 61. The driver of the other car, Luther H. Nace, 21 of Han- over, suffered serious in- juries. in A bandit strolled from a Lakewood Center bank with more than in his possession Friday night, while a teller collapsed at the feet of a bank executive as she tried to report the theft. The robber, after palienth standing in line in the crowd ed Bank 5247 of America brand Hazelbrook Ave. stepped up to the window o teller Ellen Rawlings, 38, anc ordered her to fill sack with money. a pape: THE TELLER said the ban dit had two sacks, one o which contained a gun. Aftei she filled a sack with :he man casually walked ou of the bank and mingled with he evening crowd. Operations officer W. iallagher said there we more than 80 persons in the bank at the time of the hold- up. Only two persons witnessec he lightning robbery. Both were standing in line behind he robber. The teller told sheriff's in- vestigators, FBI men and bank ifficials that the man, about 25 years old, wearing a base- lall cap, blue and white shirt .nd dark trousers, told her, 'Stop looking at the ack with money." She said she started to obey nd the man again told her, !Stop looking at me." r- AS HE LEFT the bank, the obber told "Don't do nything foolish, you are be- ng watched." After he left, she walked ver to Gallagher and as she tarted to talk to him, she ollapscd. Finally she man- ged to gasp out the word, holdup." WHERE TO FIND IT A-4, 5. B-3 to 9. B-2. A-10. Death A-6. A-6. Shipping A-6, A-7, 8, 9. A-10. Tides, TV, B-10. Wild Seas, Floods Hit in Britain Slayer Fires Seven Shots Into Victim Apartment Shared Four Years Until Breakup Last Week GARDENA friend- ship ended in a blaze of gun- fire today when one man killed another in front of the apartment they once shared. Dead is Phillip Acosta, 30, of 2811 W. 141st PI. Held as his slayer is James David Caldwell, 'A2, who has been living in an Inglewood motel for the past week. ;i: :ii 4 CALDWELL borrowed a gun from a friend and went to :he apartment about 9 a.m., 3et. Capt. Roy Tracy said. Minutes later, neighhbors said, they heard Acosla scream and run down the stairs with Caidwell in pur- suit. As Acosta reached the yard, Caldwell allegedly shot lim seven times. Tracy said Caldwell and Acosta had shared the apart- ment four years, until Cald- well left last week. Caldwell gave no motive, Tracy declared. LONDON Crashin seas, lashing rain and floodd roadways plagued Britain to day in the wake of the win ter's first violent gale. The government ferry from Jersey channel fought across Ih in mountainou waves and landed its 86 pas senders at Southampton 20 lours late. Its skipper, Capt Francis Trout, said in a tele phone call to shore: "Between Jersay and Guern sey the waves were fantastic We seemed to drop into holes n the sea." FREE 'PUNCH' FOR ALL 1 Round-House Sends Wedding to Jail house OKLAHOMA CITY The groom said "I do." The bride blushed. Her ex- husband tossed a round- house right and the wed- ding party was a free-for- all brawl. Scene of this social event was a downtown tavern here late Friday night. Overnight honeymoon ac- com m o d a t i o n s for the bride, bridegroom, ex-hus- band and 26 others were at the jail. Detective Jack Jordan said all were arrested and jailed for drunk and dis- orderly conduct. "THE said Jordan, "was a mess." He said all went well un- til the bride, Mrs. Malta Bell Henley, 56, who owns the tavern, and the bride- groom, James Lloyd Tan- ner, 39, exchanged vows before a justice of the peace as the bride's di- vorced husband, Harold Henley, 59, watched with the other guests. At that point, said Jor- dan, "the bride's ex-hus- band said he'd had all he could take. He tossed a round-house right that landed flush on the bride- groom's chin. The others started trading punches with each other." A: X JORDAN SAID a hillbilly band rented for the occa- sion stopped the music to join the brawl. They ac- companied the party to jail. "That's what comes of gelling married on Friday ihc sighed one jail- bound guest. Ike Approves Plan to Ease Latin Strife AUGUSTA, Ga. dent Eisenhower approved to- day creation of a national ad- visory committee on inter- American relations, recently strained by troubles with Cuba and Panama. Secretary of State Chris- tian A. Herter will serve as chairman. The committee will have six other members from outside the government, in- cluding Eisenhower's brother, Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower. Asked whether the setting up of the committee was irecipitated by anti-American sentiment in Cuba and riots n Panama directed at the United States, White House spokesman Wayne Hawks old newsmen he didn't know ivhether this was so. -4. CREATION OF the com- mittee was recommended by he President's brother, who las gone to Latin America on everal missions for the ad- ministration, in a report last 'anuary. Eisenhower, who is here or a working-golfing vaca- ion, spent an hour or so in lis office at Augusta Nation- 1 Golf Club handling the 'usiness of government. He is getting in as much elaxation as possible in ad- rance of a Dec. 3 take-off on good-will mis- ion to 11 nations. 'hilippines Menaced Typhoon Freda TOKYO (UPI) Typhoon 'reda, with 80-mile-an-hour vinds, was expected to strike he central Philippines early Monday, U. S. Air F-'orce- veathermen reported today. The storm was located 790 miles southeast of Manila lis afternoon and was mov- s' west .northwest at 12 iles an hour.   

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