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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: October 27, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - October 27, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Snow, Frost of Midwest Spread Over Northeast A WISCONSIN TELEPHONE company employe, William Goetsch, scrapes snow from wires lo restore communications knocked out by season's first big snow- storm in Wisconsin. Lines were downed south of Wirephoto) i Top Russ Budget Hikes All Items Except Defense MOSCOW Soviet government today un- fly Associated Press. Snow and rain and weather which put SECOND FIRM SETTLES: STEEL SHOWDOWN DUE The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LQNG BEACH 12, CALIF.; TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1959 Vol. 229 PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 34 PAGES CLASSIFIED HE 2-5B59 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Flier Killed, 19 Survive Calif. Crash Airliner Downed at Santa Maria by Engine Fire SANTA MARIA Iff) An airliner with one engine flame crashed moments nfter taking off from Santa Maria Airport Monday night. rrostyjThe co-pilot was killed but 17 passengers escaped serious a chill across most of the Midwest for the past few days spread into the Northeast today. The snow belt extended from Minnesota across upper Great Lakes injury. The twin-engine plane skirted oil derricks as it lost altitude over oil fields and farm lands near the field. It the crasned through a high-ten- sion line and broke in two a roacj near a rarrn into northern New York state. Rain mixed with snow Unsigned Flynn Will Names Bev THE WRECK, miraculous- Veiled the biggest budget in its history, with spending'covered areas from lowa'ly, didn't burn. The worst in- ihcreased for almost everything except defense. -eastward through the lower JUI'V among the passengers -.-------------------------------I Finance Minister Great Lakes region. a collarbone. I Co-pilot Joseph Flanagan, Vasilll Garbuzov told Most of the snow melted 31> of Mountain was members of the Supreme So- it touched the ground 50 feet from the nation's parliament two-inch falls covered the wreck, still strapped in his revenue would be ground in sections of Min-seat. Pilot Charles W. Craig, 42, of San Mateo, suffered scri- winds whipped lhe snow.ious bead injuries. Purser Don- creating hazaroous Robesky, 31, San Mateo, conditions. rubles and ex- Wisconsin and upper Mich.8an. Strong northerly penditures ru- bles, leaving a surplus of rubles. MCU; vnnt.- in, A Defense expenditures were t t NEW YORK Ml_An un- scl at rubles-! ,rHT RA1N signed, unwitnessed document exactly the same as last proclaiming Beverly means the percentage: THEY'VE REACHED AN AGREEMENT Edgar Kaiser chairman of the board of the Kaiser Steel Corp., and David McDonald, head of United Sieelworker Unions, shake hands in Wash- ington after reaching strike Wirephoto.) the was hurt slightly. s A PASSENGER, Philip French, of Paso Robles, said ENVOY ASKS PARLEY 17-year-old protege of the the budget devoted to pnnnsylvania southwardifiames shortly after the plane Errol Flynn, "one-third own- fensc has actually been lhe westcrn slopes of er" of the actor's estate Jamaica has turned up. duced. AT THE OFFICIAL ex- the Appalachians. Thunder- storms rumbled across scat- tered sections of the West coasl from southern lifted from the runway. He said it began vibrating vio- lently. "The pilot did a superb job of avoiding hitting the oil Voluntary ROTC Aim Predict U.S. Protest of Brown to Castro's Attacks The document, which Miss change rate, the ruble Aaclland says was written byjworth 25 cents. But it is dif-'i.ouisiana to southern Tcxas.lderricks French said her and dictated by Flynn 10 ficult to fix the exact defense1 Temperatures dipped into rlLnul months ago in Havana, was'expenditure since some mili- the 20s as far south as north- filed Monday in Surrogate tary items may be listed ern Kansas as skies cleared SACRAMENTO iff) Gov. Court here by Justin Golen- bock, Flynn's attorney and executor. may under civilian categories. Rocket research, for example, may come under the heading The Pacific Air Lines plane r University of Cahfornta was on a fight from Los An- Edmund G. Brown said to-'latesl anti-American attacks at a mass rally were ex- day that he opposes lo bring a strong protest from the U. S. gov- sory military training at the eminent today. geles to San Francisco via over the northern and smaller California plains. Golenbock last week filedjof scientific research. a will signed by Flynn inl TllE government ex- More Hospital Lab 19o4, long before he knew peruliture also is misleading! Complaints DUGS IJnrinr ihp the blonde teenager, leaving the bulk of his estate to his widow, actress Patrice Wy- more, with bequests to parents and his children. his THE SWASHBUCKLING movie star's estate is valued at more than and estimated as high as a million "I'd like to see it made the governor told cities. Santa Maria is 175! his news conference. S. Ambassador Philip Bonsai scheduled a confer- ence with President Osvakio Dorticos discuss recent the State to Westerners. Under the Communist system of govern- miles northwest of Los An- Brown said he was speak- Department phrased it. But informed sources were more specific. They said Bonsai was ex LOS ANGELES iff) An geles. Most serious! y injured jamong the passengers was !Mrs. Ruth Morris, 67, of ment ownership of all produc-iofficial of the Human Society lion and distribution facilities jof the United Slates says its (he budget includes economic'cruelty-to-animals complaint costs which are usually a Los Angeles hospi- burden of private corporations' Oshkosh, Nebr., who suffered a fractured collarbone. in non-Communist countries. tal is the first of several planned against, major U.S. medical schools. -nni H' cr, nnn FINANCIAL Planners! The society's California dollars, including a budgeted rubles) branrn copra plantation in f 0 r scientific development Jamacia. The latest document, writ- ten on sationery of the Hotel Nacional, Havana, also pro- vides for any child that Miss Aadland might have by Flynn. Golcnbock's law partner, Donald S. Shack, said the document was filed for in- formation only and had no real bearing on the actor's will. "IN VIEW of the publicity over the will, we felt the filing of these documents were ap- propriate." Shack said. Golen- bock was not available for comment. Informed in Inglewood, Calif., that the paper was un- signed, Miss Aadland snapped. "That's ridiculous. I saw Errol sign it." Her attorney, Mclvin Belli, said in San Francisco that the document is a valid will, next year, 15.4 per cent more than in 1959. For culture and education the figure was 102 billion ru- bles; health and physical cul- ture, 4Ty2 billion rubles; so- (Continued Page A-6, Col. 4) asked the State Department of Health Flashlight, Wife Save Auto as an individual, but that as president of the UC board of regents he would vote to end compulsory ROTC.-As a ______ __ land-grant school the univer-' sily must offer ROTC, but it C J need not be compulsory. The 24-mcmber board of: regents, at a meeting last A D Saturday in Davis, announced f it was considering changes in the ROTC program. Kaiser First to Break Up Solid Front Court Ruling Set Today on T-H Law Strike Injunction PITTSBURGH Steel Co., one of the nation's non-struck steel producers, today followed the lead 'of Kaiser Steel Corp. and signed a similar agreement with the United Steelworkers. David J. McDonald, union president, called the surprise settlement "another wedge in the industry's solid front.'-1: The signing followed by some 18 hours an agreement in Washington between the USW and Kaiser, one of 96 companies shut down in the now 105-day steel strike. i- i t DETROIT STEEL, employ- ing is the industry's 16th largest producer with an annual ingot capacity of million tons. It has been operating under a contract extension with the union since the nationwide strike started July 15. McDonald said the new Detroit Steel pact includ.es the same economic benefits as the Kaiser settlement. Both are 20-month agree- ments, effective Nov. 1 and expiring June 30, 1961. They irovide a total wage-fringe jenefit package increase lof cents an hour, according to McDonald. Max Zivan, Detroit Sleel board chairman and presi- dent, estimated the cost to his company at between 24 fend cents an hour. A Ifc MCDONALD EXPLAINED the difference in estimates by saying each steel company has varying cost problems that figure in its estimate. Zivan said the agreement would have to be studied thoroughly before any de- cision can be made as to the company's prices. Zivan estimated the firm's American statements, such as production at just under 1 j.i i ._ _ per cent of the industry's na- HAVANA Minister Fidel Castro's eminent that Castro's anti- he delivered in a three-hour harangue at Monday night's rally, are seriously damaging relations between the two countries. Among other things, Castro hinted the United Slates might be asked to clear out of its big naval base at Guan- tanamo in eastern Cuba. RONS A L LEFT the cm- to deny White Memorial Hos-i LANCASTER iff) His THE REGENTS revealed they had adopted a resolution pital permission to use an-wife's anxiety and William'in October calling the present 0. Skeen's trusty flashlight ROTC program "academically imals in research work be- cause, it said, dogs have been led to his rescue Monday illegally mistreated in the night after an auto accident lab. The hospital denied isolated area, charge. INVALID ELECTROCUTED High School Grid Player Injured, Dies BARSTOW (UPI) A 16- year-old Barstow High School football played died Monday night 45 minutes after being injured in a practice scrim- mage. Raymond Ramos apparent- ly suffered a broken neck when he was clipped on the chin, hospital Attendants said, Paralytic Executed for Killing Policeman WETIIERSFIELD, Conn. violent life of Frank Wojculewicz came to an end Monday night as he sat paralyzed and quiet, an invalid, in the electric chair. For seven years, he had lain in state prison here, waiting execution for the slaying of two men in a rob- bery in which he himself was shot in the spine. His ap- peals failed. He was pushed into the death chamber in a wheel chair. Four guards quietly lifted his wasted body and strapped him to the wooden death chair. It had been specially modified because his legs could not bend. An attachment was placed in front of the chair. ELECTRICITY COURSED THROUGH Wojculcwitz' body for about two minutes. Then his body was taken away. Thus ended the life of a 41-year-old man who was a juvenile delinquent at 10 and later a robber, thief, boot- legger, attempted killer. The crime that brought his execulTon was the slay- ing of Police Sgt. Waller Grahcck and a bystander, Wil- liam Otipka, in a New Britain packing house robbery in 1951. unsatisfactory." President Clark Kerr said a committee recommending changes in the itjcs open to NcgrocSi Color Bars MIAMI iff) Miami's city manager today threw city swimming pools, parks and a I I other recreational facil- Mrs Skeen worried be- program would be ready to; City Manager Ira Willard'. cause her husband was over- rcport by next March lunexpected! rulino rimpin due in arriving home from his The issue was pointed up conference with .'he Rev Lancaster music store, set out to look for him. She was driv- ing along San Franciscito road, a mile south of Eliza- beth Lake, when she saw a flickering light. She found her husband's car had turned over and rolled down an embankment. Pinned this month when a UC stu- dent went on a hunger strike against compulsory ROTC on Theodore Gibson, president of the Miami Branch of the National Assn. for I he Ad- the campus and more of Colored People. students signed his petition against it. Students previously had voted against compulsory military training. Brown said he noted some Gibson told the city man- ager the issue had been de- layed as long as possible. V "WE KNOW this is not signaling for help with his flashlight. Mrs. Sknen notified the highway patrol. Skcen was extricated and taken to An- telope Valley Hospital. At-' tendants said he had several South Gate GM broken ribs and a punctured lung. WHERE TO FIND IT Russian scientists say their regents. He said he had not ]ard, "but living in itself isjpholos of the back side of the in lhe wreckage, Skecn was: "u wt KNOW this is not signaling for heir, with his for you." he told Wil- bassy at noon for his talk with the President. The Cuban cabinet plans a late afternoon meeting. Afler the cabinet meeting, Castro is expected to an- nounce the revival of military courts and firing squads to tional capacity. The company has two plants in Detroit, one each at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Hamden, Conn. Detroit Steel did not have a clause in its previous con- tract, one of the thorniest is- sues in the battle between the USW and big producers. None was included in the new agreement. IT WAS uncertain whether price increases would 'be (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) deal with enemies of his revolutionary regime. Castro told Oie cheering thousands at Monday nightV rally, called to show popular support for his regime at a time of rising crisis, that he is ready to revive the militaty courts he set up early in his regime. They later were dis- solved after their firing squads shot more than 500 Cubans, Bringing down (Continued Page A-5, Col. 3) tried to "lobby" any of the members to his side, but that he might. not easy." City Atty. William L. Pallot told Willard there was no dif- ference between such public facilities as pools and schools, buses and other properties which the U. S. Supreme Court has ruled must be opened to Negroes. "IN OTHER said Willard, "I have no choice but to grant their (NAACP) noon sunshine Wcdncs- Ust Wednesday The attorney said that was day. Slightly warmer 'workers GM'S chevrolct the case. Weather Considerable cloudi- ness tonight and Wednesday. Some after- causc nf stccl shortages Layoffs Loom LOS ANGELES General Motors announced today it will lay off em- ployes at its bilc-Pontiac assembly plant at South Gate this weekend he- Wednesday. M a x i mum temperature by noon to- day: 71. :and Fisher Body assembly plants in Van Nuys were laid off due to the 105-day steel strike. The integration order, Wil- lard said, will apply to seven pools, playgrounds, tennis courts and dozens of parks. moon heralded future pic- tures of the planets. See Page A-3. Beach B-l Hal A-1S A-15 C-4 to 9 B-6, 7 B-8 Death B-2 A-14 B-3 Shipping C-4 C-l to 4 A-12 Tides, TV, C-IO A-15 B-4, S Soviet Bids U.N. Act on K Arms Plan UNITED NATIONS W) The Soviet Union declared today that world opinion de- mands immediate action on Premier Khrushchev's plan for total disarmament. Vasily V. Kuznetsov, deputy Soviet foreign minis- ter, told the General Assem- bly's 82-nation Political Com- mittee the Khrushchev plan had met with general acclaim both in the United Nations and elsewhere. He said approval of the Soviet proposal by the As- sembly would be an im- portant contribution to end- ing the threat of war, but he offered no formal resolution asking such endorsement. The Western powers and the Soviet Union are now car- rying on private negotiations on a resolution referring the Soviet plan and other pro- posals to the new 10-nation Disarmament Committee. U, S. sources said they still felt confident thSf agreement would be reached on a resolu- tion that would not put spe- cial emphasis on the chev plan.   

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