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Press Telegram: Saturday, October 17, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - October 17, 1959, Long Beach, California                             WORLD MOURNING GEN. MARSHALL Blaze Rages Unchecked in Fifth Day Flames Within Half Mile of Homes1 in Big .Tujunga Area LOS ANGELES upexpected calm held a pall of smoke over a hungry brush fire north of Los Angeles today. Firefighters took advantagi of the lull in winds to built up a two-mile fire line in the northwest section of I he blaze. Although the Weather Bu reau had forecast brisk winds today, they failed to mate rialize. THE FIRE has claimed I life and 13 injuries. And there was no prospect of immediate control. It all started, officials be lieve, when somebody care- lessly flipped a cigarette. Much of the force of men was concentrated on the north front of the fire. No buildings had been destroyed in this area, but flames were near a camp grounds. In Big Tujunga Canyon, north of the community of Tujunga, the fire was within a half mile of homes in La Paloma Flats. Residents of this small settlement had been evacuated Thursday night and were still out early today. :ON THE EASTERN front, the fire was within a mile of a Nike missile base con- trol center on Mount Disap- pointment. But officials felt it "would be unnecessary to pull out equipment. The site is surrounded by a rocky area almost clear of brush. La Canada, Altadcna and other communities south and southeast of the fire were out of danger, but the Forest Service said increased winds could put them in peril again. .Leo Poblano, 50, a Zuni' Indian from Zuni, N. M., was: killed when a plane acciden-! tally dropped a load of fire-1 fighting chemicals on him and four other fire-fighters.1 The others were injured. Officials said they weren't' sure whether Poblano had I died as a result of the bomb-' Finest Evening Newtpaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 PAGES PRICE 1.0 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 Vol. 221 CLASSIFIED HE Z-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Girl Friend of Streaks Faints at L. A. MPH With Pilot Second Powered Flight a Success Over Mojave Desert EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE An X15 rocket ship made its second success- Pay Tribute to War Chief, Truman Aid Former President Once Said General Greatest American WASHINGTON leaders paid tribute to Gen. George C. Marshall, who ;uided America's armed might in World War II and created the postwar Marshall Plan to safeguard free nations against communism. Marshall's death Friday at Walter Reed Army Hospital brought expressions of sorrow and loss from all over the country and many capitals in Europe. The general had suf- fered a stroke last Jan. 15 at ful powered flight today, test- ing its engines for future trips hls winter home In P'nehurst, to the edge of space. JN. C., and was brought to, The 50-foot-long black ar-1 Walter Reed March 11. row cut loose from its B52 Perhaps no man of his time (many of his countrymen as EXHAUSTING ITS fuel Catlctt Marshall. three-minute burst lhat! pushed it close to THREE PRESIDENTS an hour, the X15 Truman and Ei- around a 100-mile circle and revered his swooped in for a landing at'awesome abilities as a soldier, about a.m. istatesman and diplomat. The entire flight from drop He led the gigantic war ma- II to landing took about 10 hine of the United States as minutes. .Army chief of staff through-' Test pilot Scott Crossfield out World War II. Then in' was at the controls, as he evening of his life, he was been in all previous to duty as secretary fl'6nls- 'of state and again, during Crossfield, 37, look the X15 Korean War, as secretary of up to feet in its power flight Sept. 17. APPEARANCE This picture of Gen. George C. Marshall, who died Friday at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Wash- ington, was made at one of his last public appear- ances when he attended a theater performance in Pinehurst, N. C., in February Photo.) S. AID SEIZED TO A CAR at International Airport in Los Angeles is Errol Flynn's I7i !8meSi two four-barrel rockets year-old girl friend, Beverly Aadland (center) afl.er she fainted on arriving (designed to thrust the shiP For his fomulation of the .Marshall Plan, which bol- THAT WAS the first flight stered free nations of the test of the stubby winged wjth massjve economic crafts lower-atmosphere from Anlericai Marshall was awarded the Nobel Peace from Vanouver, B..C., Friday nightt lefis a of Miss Aadland's, Linda Tartar, Wircphoto) rign .friend Steel Eyes RETUKNING TO FILMLAND 4 f auf m KA. _A I New Offer Union up to feel and reach; 'speeds of close to miles I, an hour. Later this American Avialion Inc. will Prize in 1953. Charge Soviets Try to Force LB. Man to Turn Spy WASHINGTON United States charged P.dnt Eisenhower authorities" death (JIIICKItoi the LI. S. Embassy in Moscow (cause for profound grief i Friday and tried to force him to spy against the United winter North throughout u n i t edlStates. 3 Women in Errol's Life to Attend Rites (install a more powerful single- chamber engine for the XlS's blast up to altitudes imiles. of more than 100 States." He ordered the flagj The Slate Department said threats of violence and to be flown at half staff from'offers of money were made in an effort to force him NFW YORK mpn i HOLLYWOOD made NEW YORK minionS) js relurnj lo Hollywood-in a plain! ing or from an ensuing fall industry leaders slipped out W0nden coffin. down a cliff. One Killed, 28 Hurt in Bus Crash PRINCETON, Ind. Greyhound double-decker bus from Florida upset at the end of a stretch of dual highway on U. S. 41 late Friday night, killing a woman passenger and jnjuring 28 persons, two of them critically. the dead woman, believed to be from Tennessee, was so badly crushed thai state po lice couldn't identify her. p THOSE WITH lesser injur- ies were treated at the hos- pital and sent to a Princeton hotel for the rest of the night. Otis Rieber, 38, Paris, III., driver of the bus, bound for Chicago from St. Petersburg, Fla., said he missed a turn at of their homes and hotels to-; And three of the many women in the 50-year-old Trio Trapped i Ike Ready all public buildings and mili- tary installalions until alter 'Marshall's funeral Tuesday i The general's body will lie ;in slate in the Bethlehem J_ TfttL Chapel of Washington Cathe- O 'al from noon Monday until noon Tuesday. The cathedral is Episcopalian. In end the 95-day-old steel striked buried in Memorial Park at Forest Lawn, without federal injunction. Heads of the 12 big steel Q IS 11 companies had been expected LQ I to meet in the Waldorf-Asto-, ria Hotel at 10 a.m. but there was no sign of them in the huge many-entranced building at that hour. Steel executives registered in the hotel did not answer their doors. Others were reported to have left their homes and other hotels for undisclosed destinations. by Typhoon in Okinawa i to act as a Soviet spy. j The U. S. Embassy protest- Jed To the Soviet Foreign Min- 'islry Friday afternoon. The Soviet government ordered jthe diplomat Russell A. Lan- gelle, removed from Russia on grounds that he had engaged Jin espionage against the So- iviet Union. e r m a n y Langelle, 37, is a native of informants saidjS'- Louis. Mo. His present ________......._ ____ ____ _ Eisenhower'isihonle address given by death as in life, thejpersistenl in the face of dis-jof the Arlington National j Prepared lo meet the 21S screen lover stirred contro- couraging odds, rescue in Virginia. Inter-jment chiefs of Britain, Franceicalif eacii Three nidiiy wumen in tne ou-year-oid i i r day for a secret meeting on a actor's life plan to attend his funeral Monday morning Mf HO TYPICALLY- Marslla11 llad> Ge, new union proposal that couldiat Forest Lawn's Church of the Recessional He will IY'IIIC I I Idecreed that his funeral be i end the 95-day-old steel buried in Memorial Park al Forest Lawn. I S1LVERPEAK Nev W Prcsidenl unthnul Ol L V r LA 1NCV. I r 1. lviyt.1 OR I lie eU2C versy. His eslranged third wife, dancer Patrice Wymore, and his 17-year-old protegee, blonde Beverly Aadland, Vied over who would handle the funeral arrangements. tunneled into a hill three different directions day, trying to reach three men trapped or crushed by a mine shaft cave-in. The shaft collapsed Friday at the Mohawk silver mine in from rnenf. in the cemetery, re.stinp and West Germany at a con-l The United States rejected s to-place of soldiers both illus- f-r.np. in Snvip( A SPOKESMAN for Miss Aadland, who had a once-rich soutn of NAHA, Okinawa lbeen Flynn's companion for y phoon Charlotte left at Hie last two years, planned to 28 Persons dead after! have the actor's body flown the 90 to j 0 United States Steel Corp. winds p o 1 i he had been told the meetinglsajd. place was changed, but not where it was being held. industry leaders of the n companies affected by the kiMcd at ,Msl 2Q strike were expected to pre-, There were no 3. C., I'where he died, in a coffin. BUT SHE STEPPED aside las Miss Wymore and her law- yers gave instructions to an trious and humble, private. Eisenhower's said in part: "For swerving devotion jference in Europe around Soviet accusation againsi, ce I Langelle, but the State De- end of October. slat emenl A date for an East-West his un- summit meeting would bel to the settled at that time, these in-l security and freedom of sajd nation, for his wise counsel' _. and action and driving deter- Eisenhower reportedly made mination in times of grave this tiny western Nevada community. "The odds are against the men being said James Wike, business manager of the mine. "But there is still that hope. "We're going to wo rk (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1) 'Macmillan. around the clock until we find them. Dead or alive." known his views in letters to danger, we are laslingly in Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, his debt." partmenl said he and his fam- ily will leave Moscow soon. AN ORDER for ouster of a diplomat by the host nation has to be obeyed by his home government under normal dip- lomatic procedure. The note of protest said President Charles de Gaulle! Langellc was seized by five It was Marshall who prime Minister in civilian clothing at 9 ja.m. (Moscow time) Friday, ________ (forced into an automobile and _ [driven to a building on Vo- 5-SfCir EUROPEAN St. where he was 'if all parties agree to it, would detained for one hour and 45 He counter-proposal to joint [ported among American mili- the end of the dual lane stretch three miles south of Princeton. sparked by reports that The bus ran off the road, v it flipped union negotiations in Wash- ington this afternoon. The hope of a setllemenl n the long steel shutdown and Rieber said onto its left side. some of the 12 companies in (Continued Page A-3, Col. 8) how'tonE Off Iftf take Place He was accused reach the men. "We but might be held in Geneva.. Lhere against the HciMjimei. j and know exactly where to the reported, typhoon. he said. "They werelQut OT NlttC (timetable a summit confer-i working between the 200 of tne (Continued Page A-3, Col. 3', Dinah, blew up in the and skirted the Island of Guam. t t t Iket aboard CHARLOTTE, still Flynn's body was brough southward in a traveling cas- a railroad bag Buster Wiles, Flynn's 20 Race Horses Die in Flames at Stable WEST GREENWICH, R.I. least 20 thorough- bred race horses, including famed money winner Park Dandy, were destroyed early today when fire raced through the stable barn of William J, (Jim) Beattie. Benttie, wealthy lace manufacturer and sports- man, and a groom managed to save four thoroughbreds before being driven out of the smoke-filled barn by flames. Park Dandy was the high- predicted it will be -195 miles[ southwest of Tokyo early! on its last voyage. MISS AADLAND, who wa: Sunday morning. It is ex-' P, was nonoH L...u when he died of peeled to pass well south of! the Japanese capital. U.S. military sources said the typhoon caused est winning New i'11 damages to highways, England bred or owned [buildings, and military instal- horse. The 9-year-old had on Okinawa. earnings of during eight racing seasons. Beattie the horses were "the best I ever raised" and placed the value of some of them at to each. Unofficial estimates of damage ranged up to The island, site of the United States' largest Pacific fortress, rtill was without lights and utilities today. Ike on Golf Course WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower took advan- tage of a warm, sunshiny, fall a heart attack Wednesday, returned lo Hollywood Fri- day night. Her arrival was marred by chaos at the In- ternational Airport. The young actress greeted by several friends. As they walked lo a car, Ihey fell over a reslraining log. Miss Aadland fainted, and her friends shrieked at photogra- phers not to take pictures. Nora Eddington, Flynn's second wife, plans to pay her final respects. The ac- tor's first wife, French ac- 000. Fire fighters said the iday for a round of golf at the'tress Lili Damit'a, is in Palm 300-foot level, but they WASHINGTON the United States have had a warning andjdeath of Gen. George France with Soviet Pre-i'KIDNEY AILMFNT1 gone somewhere else. TherelMarshall thinned to three theimjer Nikita S. are smaller tunnels leading] ranks of the five-star would be held at Ge-i off the one they were work-j appointed during World Wannevn around Dec 7 ing in. ill. The nine men were: This would give the top "We're drilling in from the. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhow- leaders little more than Now Mother Needs Names for Boy, Girl B 0 S T 0 N r i j r it I i innv. IIIIJIG v u i it {Ul If---IVllh, 200-ool level and from the er. 69-who resigned his com- week for negolialions since! Elizabeth MacArthur's mission jn ,952 to run fonjl woulc, have to cnd beforei ,.K.dnpy the start of the annual Paris two names today. One for 300-foot level. And we've got men going down an old shaft wo wMujt vync i< and trying to up un-: Gen. Douglas MacArthur, meeling of the North Atlantic1 a hoy. and one for a girl. President. derneath them." board chairman Organization Council! The missing men are BillJSperry Rand Corp. Delorme of Redding, Gen. Omar N. Bradley, James Robinson of Mina, now board chairman, Bulova ne postponed. set for about Dec. 15, al though this, of course, could Nev., and Sam Sickles of I Watch Co. and Bulova Re Tonopah, Nev. Robinson and Sickles arc married and Wike search and Development1 Laboratories. WHERE TO FIND IT said Sickles has adult chil-i Adm. Chester W. A-4, 5. dren. 74_n0w retired in B-3 to 9. Calif. A-10. Adm. Ernest J. B-10. June 1956. Death B-2. Adm. William D. A-6. Hazy sunshine Sun- i died July 1959. Shipping Page B-2. day. Fog and tow clouds 1 Adm- WiIIiam F- Sports-Pages A-7, 8, 9. Weather- ne new, wet sawdust. .to attend the rites. night and early morning. Little change in tem- perature. died August 1959. Theaters Page A-2. Vital Statistics-Page B-2. The 24-year-old South Boston woman started out for the office of Dr. Robert Williams for a slight kidney infection. The pain in her side, she thought, was due to the ail- ment. But halfway to the office, Mrs. MacArthur decided that the pain was remark- ably similar to what she had been told of labor pains. She appealed to" a policeman for help. Police sped her fo th8 nearby doctor's office and twins were delivered with- in 20 minutes.   

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