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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - October 6, 1959, Long Beach, California                             IKE INVOKES T-H LAW TO HALT DOCK STRIKE The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1959 Vol.LXXII-No.2M PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 36 PAGES CLASSED H. EDITION (Six Editions Daily) THOSE SMILES ARE FOR DAD Cindy Hodges holds telephone as her sister, Irene, and brother, Gil Jr., wait to talk by long distance telephone from New York to their dad, Dodger first baseman Gil Hodges, in Los Angeles. The smiles stem from the fact that Pop hit the home run that beat Chica go in Monday's series Dodgers Go {or Decisive Series Game LOS ANGELES Wl Quiz Show '2V Rigged, Winner Tells Probers Russ to Ask U. It-Backed Space Parley Kuznetsov Makes Disclosure in Talk Before Assembly U N 1 T ED NATIONS The Soviet Union announced today it will propose an in- ternational scientific confer- ence on outer space to be held j under United Nations pices. j The a n n o u n c ement made by Vasily V. Kuznetsov, j a deputy Soviet foreign min-j ister, in a speech before the, .-U. N. General Assembly. WASHINGTON (AP) student Herbert The disclosure came on the Chicago'w'hite Sox faced Losjstempel' testified today he asked for a chance to of an announcement by Angeles' southpaw ]10nest game" on the now-defunct TV quiz showjSoviet scientists in Moscow specialist Sandy Koufax in ]ale 1956 and was turned down. their latest space rocket, day, fully aware that said the reqllesl passed the moon and was' headed back toward the earth they beat him they have lost' the World Series. Koufax set a National I I f W League record for strikeouts' beating thc San Francisco Giants Aug. 31. but; he ,was wild and ineffective: in the closing weeks of the pennant drive. Bob Shaw.j beaten by Los Angeles 4-3 in the. second game of the sc- ries, opponent.! slurted THE WEATHER MAN said Way for K 'Copters WASHINGTON Stemple said the was made when Dan Enright, on, .r Ike Keeps Hands Off in Steel Tie-Up Hopes for Accord Without Invoking of Taft-Hartley for Work Setup President's Order Says Tie-up Perils U. S. Health, Safety PALM SPRINGS, Calif. Eisenhower today jinvoked the Taft-Hartley Law n the docks strike, opening lie way for the government o seek an 80-day back-to- work court order. The President, acting at his vacation headquarters, de- clared in an executive order that the six-day strike which has tied up shipping piers PITTSBURGH Maine to negotiations remained com-jand safety" if permitted to pletely broken off today as continue. Eisenhower said he The shutdown, he added, is still banking on a negoti- has llad a" imPact on iflow of food and other pensh- atcd strike settlement without products to thc populated coastal areas. In Washington, Labor De- rtment officials predicted that a back-to-work injunc- HAWAII the thermometer will hit 82 Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev degrees in Los Angeles American helicopters but it may be 10 degrees hot- ter on the floor of Memorial coached him for earlier ques-s lhc N ,g Space I Committee created last year "Did Mr. Ennght reuse? ;to study ways of international Stcmple was asked at a committee inquiry. today thc Soviel Un. "Yes." Stcmple replied. accused lhc Western pow-. _____ The.said that I had to go for of aggravating the cold----------------------------------------------- the good of the ..show." Jwar bv refusing to n Slemple said he had told Communist for a scat; K 6 D O TT U.. Gov. James Kcaloha of Hawaii is greeted with and government intervention. Eisenhower, at his Palm Springs, Calif., vacation head- quarters, invoked the Taft- j Hartley law to pave thc wjn and oh. ;for an 80-day jn fcdera, court b Frj. jCnd of the six-day 'strike, but avoided taking sim- ilar action to wind up thc EISENHOWER took no 84-day steel stoppage. aclioni On i Instead, Eisenhower 84-day-old steel strike. pressed hope through hisjdespite the new of Ipress secretary that the steel; negotiations. would; The President said regard- a kiss by Dorothy Taylor, Georgia Poultry Prin- cess, on his arrival at Southeastern Fair in Atlan- 'confinue negotiations that nationwide shut- achieve a speedy settlement.down, however, that lhe dis- putc between management ta today. Smiling approval (center) is Kealoha's j THERE WAS no immediate and labor "seems to be get wife. He headed a group that came from Hawaii move by thc steel disputantSjling down more and more to to attend "Hawaii Day" festivities at thc fair, held in honor of the new 50th Photo) todav to cet ,Communist Poland or a scat several people of his lhe u. N. security Council Coliseum, 30 feet below street level. Another crowd above watched the Ameri- can and National League pen- nant winners fight it out. Thc Dodgers' 5-4 victory Monday was achieved on Gil Hodges' run into like President Eisenhower uses. Ambassador Mikhail A. Menshikov stopped by the tions to lose. His United States and Dr. Nathan Brody, ta i n, aiong with many Hills, N. y., was called to cor- roborate that testimony. other non-Communist coun- tries, have announced they are backing Turkey for the Has Circled Moon to get back into direct nego-ja trial of strength between liations. However, both sidesjlwn groups with the Ameri- were studying the remarksjcan public the greatest made in California for Eisen-j loser." h o w c r by the President's. In expressing that view for press aid, James C. Hagerty.) Eisenhower, White Houso Hagerty said Eisenhower.Press Secretary James C. si ill believes "that free col- Hagerty said further: lective bargaining is on "1 might add that the BRODY TESTIFIED European seat in thc night the Lunar space rocket has passed and thc parties should stay in MOSCOW scientists announced to- negotiation until they reach v r... l-I.l tr President has no intention of behind ncmrimpnt to "came lo me council. A jsReading back toward the earth orbit chart- Uepaitmeni 10 UILLK ,t hnfnrp HIP hv )hn r.pnnral agreement.' 'added, however, Hagerly that thel with Dep. Undersecretary Livingston T. Merchant about the "choppers" which evoked c Khrushchev's e n t h u s i asm J till IMIU UIG Jttt. crs off Chicago relief pitcher vhen the Gerry Slaley. It was Los An- geles' third consecutive win after the Sox took the opener, afternoon before the finally-ill be taken by thc j( show and told me Tomorrow [Assembly soon, perhaps later I'm taking a jthis week. Slempel, a graduate student; n history at New York Uni-j 11-0. lj! MONDAY'S attendance, 550, established a new World Series record. H beat a record set-in the Coliseum Sunday, when 92.294 turned out. The first four games of the series have drawn persons who paid 735.35. The players' share was .f892.365.04. They do not share in any remaining games of the, series. premier for several rides. Menshikov told newsmen after talking with Merchant hat the Russian commercial aid would get in touch with he Sikorsky division of the United Aircraft Corp. Sikorsky produces the nine- passenger, S58 heli- :opters which the Marines and Army assign for presi- dential use. Menshikov, asked if the Russians would purchase one of the ships, replied: "Perhaps a few. What Hurricane Still Peril to Ships WASHINGTON (UPI) Hurricane Hannah swirlec eastward across the Atlantic today, its 105-mile-an-hour winds no longer a threat to the United States but still a menace to shipping. The Weather Bureau warned all ships in the path of the tropical storm to "exer else extreme caution." BIT OF DAMAGE Atom Sub Hits Whale on Cruise PORTSMOUTH, N. H. UP) The nuclear-powered submarine Seadragon ran into a little trouble while on a test run Monday night hit a whale. Thc Seadragon, second nuclear sub built at the naval shipyard here, left Monday for four days of builders sea trials. The boat came back to port, today with a report it struck a whale while running on the surface. There was some damage reported to a propeller and shaft. versity, was the opsning wit-'jpresSi the Soviet U.N. dele- ness at a four-day inquiry, be-lgatjon declared that the fore the House Subcommittee w e s t e r n "discrimination" on Legislative Oversight, into Soviet bloc countries charges that some of the big-jn Eastern Europe must "The rocket is moving name television quiz shows were rigged. The subcommittee viewed relaxation of international 'ilm of one of Stempel's initialjtension is in evidence, such matches with Charles Vanidjscrimmation is a manifesta- Doren, one of the first big- of the cold war and is AF Atlas Firing Reported a Success CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla Air Force reported satisfactory performance to- day by an Atlas missile firec out over the Atlantic on a test with a new type tactical nose cone. STATEMENT to the It was annnunrcd Ihr de- vice came within 4.375 miles of the moon at the nearest approach. About Hire- '-ours later it was miles away "near the plane of the lunar equator." brought to an end. H added: "Under conditions where strictly along the present or- the official news agency NEWPORT Tass said. money winners of the program. Then Stempel told of being to the cause of peace. performances. soviet statement was coached and rehearsing his cjrcuiated a few hours before 'Kuznetsov addressed the 82- Stempel, who charged Assembly on this and year that "Twenty-One" issues before the cur rigged, has said he finally lost to Van Doren purposely, by agreement. s THE SUBCOMMITTEE has Weather said that it has no plans to! Variable high cloudi- question Van Doren, who has' ness through Wednes- rent session. Man Shot Row by Spear Gun in _ i n President won t let the public Hagerty said Eisenhower asked him to say regard- become "the greatest loser" worst in American history. ing the steel shutdown that "this situation is not collec- tive bargaining, which is the instrument open to a free THE STEEL WORKER dis- saying industry work- Pules- t ASKED WHETHER Eisen- hower will invoke the Taft- Hartley Law in the steel strike, too, unless there is a the union. ers have earned a fair settle- ment, meanwhile pledged to continue their strike "until Justice is done." BEACH A The union's 170-member' local man was shot twice wage policy committee issued with a spear gun by his host'a statement: reaffirming Mrmrlav nipht iunion's rejection of an indus-l r short- L. Archer, ry settlement offer classed o anUcipate any Action y est possible distance from 1127 fc 30th St., is in scrious'by the union as totally in- Hies.dent way the surface of the moon condition at Hoag Memorial -adequate 7nnn kiiome- Hospital with 12 punctures in David J. McDonald, union t r irrifThis intestines after he was president, said no furtheifree collective bargaining is p.m.) Moscow time t'lyitwice impaled by the speanmeefngs were scheduled withjon trial, and the completed its m o v e m e n tjfrom the skmdiver's weapon., ,Continued Page A.4i Col. 5) (Continued Page A-4, Col. 6) round the moon. I Officers said Archer was, rtainly am not going other. I simply repeat what, the President has At 20-00 (S p.m.) MoscoWjWounded by Cecil G. Barkley, -----time thc distance from of 108 31st St., during an surface of thc moon was 000 kilometers (about told a New York grand juryi hc had no idea anything wasi day. Local fog or clouds late night (Continued Page A-4, Col. 3) I early morning hours. FEW EVEN REALIZED HE WAS WEALTHY Quiet, Little Known Bachelor Leaves Million to Charity ALSO BOOKED on suspi-! cion of attempted murder! IT WAS STATED the sci- were Minnie Sue low Jcntific equipment was and her husband, Harold LJ! ating normallv and 53, both of 30th SI j tures and pressures within. Police said Barkley toldj the space vehicle accorded them that Archer had insulted with pre-set figures. by calling him a child Its next transmissions while the victim was earth-possibly i'ncl udi ngjtalking to Mrs. Thompson in -1 the bedroom of Berkley's (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) .home. Barkley then went to thel WHERE TO FIND IT of llis home and came T 1U1XI- .0 bedroom with a BOSTON bachelor who lived so quietly that few people knew he was wealthy has left 17 million dollars to charity. The bequest was by Albert Stone Jr., 82. who died May 10. The Boston Safe Deposit Trust Co. disclosed Monday night Stone left 17 mil- lion dollars, mostly in common stocks, to the Permanent Charity Fund, nearly dou- bling the fund's principal. The trust company, serving as trustee, said is being assigned immediate- ly to help combat Boston's juvenile delin- quency. William Wolbach, a member of the fund committee, said: "We honestly don't know what he (Stone) did. We know he was interested in charity for many years and gave anony- mously to worthy causes." Stone's only living relative is Sidney Stone of Wayland, a cousin. He said the philanthropist was in the shoe business as a jobber at the turn of the century. He sold the firm in 1910 and joined his grandfather and other relatives in the real estate business. Wolbach said he understood Stone was left several million dollars by his father and that the family had textile interests. He added: "During his lifetime Mr. Stone did not like headlines or ostentation. He was a friendly, gracious and warm man. His life was a pattern of simple dignity." Neighbors of Stone recall seeing him leave his three-story brick house for an occasional afternoon walk. He had a house- keeper and a caretaker. Betting odds in the British spear gun, police said. He election next Thursday heav-fired two sharp pointed ily favor the Conservatives, spears from the weapon, both Page A-3. Beach B-l. Hal B-7. B-7. D-2 to 7. C-6, 7. C-5. B-6. B-3. Shipping D-I. C-I, 2, 3, 4. C-5. Tides, TV, D-8. Vital D-1. B-7. B-4, 5. Your A-2. puncturing Archer's body, ac- cording to investigators. Two Burn to Death in Burbank Crash BURBANK (UPI) Two men burned to death here early today when their pick- up burst into flames after ill Rescue crews had to cut PLAYING WITH fIRE through the charred vehicle (o remove the bodies. The victims were identified as Charles Rice, 33, of Pa- jcoima and Robert A. Be- 'queue, 25. of North Holly- KEEP DOGS WITIihX IMIOSURE. A Siamese cat named Boysun stalks calmly along rail of the liner Constitution past an enclosure where dogs are walked during crossing. Boysun arrived with his owners, Capt. Fred Manning and his wife, Mrs. Ramona Manning, en route from Italy to new assignment at Ford Ord,   

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