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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 25, 1959, Long Beach, California                             WILL KHRUSHCHEV KEEP HIS WORD TO THEM? Premier Khrushchev has promised Mr. and Mrs. Paulius Leonas of Chicago lhat Russia will allow their children, Regina and Thomas Leonas to come to this country from Lithuania. The parents, who haven't seen the two since fleeing to this country in 1944, tearfully confronted Khrushchev during his stopover in Des Moines. Thursday, Khrushchev heard an appeal from Miss Donne Armonas (below) during his visit in Pittsburgh. She asked that her mother be permitted to come to this country from Lithuania. Said Khrushchev: "Little girl, expect your mother very Wirephoto) Ceylon Chief Shot Down by 2 Assassins COLOMBO, Ceylon Prime Minister Solomon W. R. D. Bandaranaikc was shot and critically wounded today by a gunman attired in the yellow robes of a Buddhist monk. Three bullets wore re- moved. A medical source said the shots penetrated his liver and spleen. Four pints of blood were given him. Ceylon radio broadcast appeals for additional donors. The assassin, shot in the knee by a sentry as he sought In escape, also was hospital- ised. There was no hinl as l.o his motive. Bandaranaikc appealed "to all to show com- passion for this foolish man." Gov. Gen. Sir Oliver Goo- nclillikc declared a stale of emergency in this Indian Ocean Island. i IN A BROADCAST lo the nation, he announced mobili- zation of the regular reserves and the volunteer forces of the army, navy and air force. Me said he did so for the pro- tection of the people. He reported that the prime minister's condition was termed by surgeons "satisfac- tory" but he could nol be con- sidered out of danger. Police said that between a.m. and a.m. Iwo men in the robes of Buddhist monks called at the prime minister's house and asked to sec him. Randaranaike greeted them. After they had talked, the prime minister look leave of one by bowing. As he wasj about tn bid farewell to I he! other, the first whipped a .'15- calibcr revolver from under his robes and fired six shots. JUST BEFORE he was operated on, the prime min ister said: "I appeal to the people of my country to be restrained and patient at this time. With the assistance of my doctors I shall make every endeavor to be able to con- tinue such services as I am able to render my people." Bandaranaike was due to leave for New York Monday to atlcnd a session of the U.N. General Assembly. He planned later visits to London, Cairo and Bonn. Bandaranaikc came to power in April IHIifi. Ihc year this island got its independ- ence as a member of the Brit- ish Commonwealth. KHRUSHCHEV ASSERTS VISIT EASING TENSIONS The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1959 44 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 Vol. LXXII-No. 202 HE HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Dodgers Battle to 4 to 2 Lead at Top of Sixth By GEORGE LEDERER (P-T Baseball Writer) Dodgers led the Chicago Cubs 4-2 after the top of the sixth inning of their important Na- tional League game here today. Don Drysdale and Glen lobbie were on the mound for the respective teams. The Dodgers Steel Chief Has Surgery, Then Stroke HYANNIS, M a s s. Walter Munlord, presi- dent of the strikebound U. S. Steel Corp., suffered a stroke in Cupc Cod Hospital Thurs- day. It occurred a day after he suffered an abdominal knife ANCHORAGE, Alaska airliner carrying1 16 persons crashed and caught fire Thursday night on an Aleutian island peak. A search pilot radioed he sawj no sign of life at the scene. The Reeves Aleutian Air- lines DC3 piled into a mountainside at the level on great Sitkin Island, miles northeast of its destination at Adak Island. A Navy pilot who sighted wreckage '10 minutes after the crash reported the plane was afire but that the tail section seemed intact. The Navy tug Apache reached the island with a ground party this morning, but there was delay in reach- ing the crash scene over rug- Cash Can Be Yours- li You Act! Collect early on your Social jccnrily. Thai's Ihe offer made god terrain. through The Press-Telegram's Andlr Lucky Social Security Num- bers Contest. Eleven new cash winners, as in the past and in the fu- ture, are announced today. THE DC.'t, en route from >rage on a flight that served communities and mili- tary bases along the Aleutian island chain, carried five crewmen, two civilians and nine militarv Air! It's simple to enter. Just'Force, one Army and one! scored one in the first inning on Wally Moon's 19th homer of ihe season. It was a long ilasl into the centerfield jleachers. Chicago evened the count at 1-1 in its half of the same lining when Tony Taylor doubled and denied the plate on Ernie Banks' single. Both tennis tallied single runs in the fifth inning. CHICAGO THREATENED o blow Ihe game wide open n Ihc fifth, bul salvaged only jnc run. Sammy Taylor sin- gled, Alvin Dark walked, then lobbie forced Taylor. Norm Barker went deep inlo led- icld lo pull down Tony Tay- or's long drive. George All- nan's single to righl scored >.rk and .sen I Hobble I" bird. However, Jim Marshall round out to end I he threat. The. Dodgers went ahead in he sixth inning when Gil doubled home Duke Snider and Larker. The game, play by play: FIRST INNING I OS nonorrt lo B.lnkl. IIMl loulcd lo Mrirslull. MOfn III', nil 19th home run Inlo crnlcrlield blroil" rrr, .Snider wfllKcd. Lnrkc. luncd .imacr., Brink', unniiiblcd. One run. one nn. "u C'aiK.AOO T. doulllrd lo left. AllmVin liruik out. Mnrilirit Ilicd lo Sni- der singled to center, icoi.no T. Uvlor Morvn w.tlkcd tJoren lined to One run, Iwo lilts, no errors, two SECOND INNING LOS ANGHLIZS Brinks threw out, Modoes Roieboro popoed to Dark. OflnkslsatO Ihrr-w out Wills. No runs, no Ilill. no threw oijl S. Tnvlor. Drtrk struck out. Hohhlf Hied lo Larker. No runs, no hits, no eirors, none lell. THIRD INNING I OS Drvldalc struck iul. Glill.im loulcd 10 walked. Moon Hied lo Allmrtn. No runs, no lilts, no errors, one Icll. UtICAGO-T. Tnvlor filed to Wnon Alti.inM oul. MAr'.h.lli Hopped to No runs, no hll-.. no er.ots, none POURTH INNING nn slr.lrv tflrl.fr nonped TflvIO' behind second. Hodor: oul on strikfs Ho runs, no hits, no errors nonr led. CHICAGO- Banks ixinord lo Wlllv Irtrf" oul Morvn rtnd Norm, No runs, no hits, no rrrors. none FIFTH INNING L05. ANGRLES Roschoro wl'l-ed nsrhoro stole second. T. Tflvlnr Ilirrw jt Wills. RoselMj.o golno lo Iti.rd. Orvv lie Hied to Allmrtn. Rosetioro scorinn ..ter the Cfl'ch. GHn.ini filed lo Noren. One run. no hlU. no errors, none irlt. Tflvioi slnoled lo renlrr. DflrV walked. Hobble forced S. Tflvlor Hodge' fo G'lllftni. l.arker went dr-en lor T. Taylor's llv to Icll. Altmfin sinnied to right, scoring Dflrk and sending invnclic'itinn to Ihlrd Heal Ihrtw oul Onel'1'1 l-5llg.ll 1OI1 in, Iwo nils, no errors. Iwo lelt. SIXTH INNING LOS Itirew oul Heal. Mnon was railed oul on strikes. Snider Snider stole second The atiend ance was announrr-d as Larger fd. Hodges doubled against tnc crn- llcld wail, scoring wound which Disl. Ally. Kdnuind Dinis said WHS accidentally inflicted. Mun- ford htid undergone surgery several hours after the stub- bing. Dr. Roberl L. O'Connor, U.S. Slecl medical director, issued n statement todiiy say- Munford had suffered a cerebral thrombosis. Me his right arm is paralyzed and he is having dilficiilly in speaking. DR. O'CONNOR'S stale- cm said his condition is not critical and lhal Munford is progress ing .salisfaclorily from Ihe surgery Wednesday A district attorneys "j he appeared lo have: (SHU ON THE MOVE Soviet Premier Khrushchev leaves his car on arrival today al Ihc Russian Embassy in Washing- Ion for a brief visit before lunching with U.S. Secretary of Slate Chrislian Photo) Siamese Twins Die ess Operation Fails CHICAGO difficult allempl lo save the lives of liny Siamese (wins by scparaliny ibnn Maps Ideas for Crucial Talks to Ike President, Russian Fly to Mountains for Parleys Today WASHINGTON Khrushchev today ex- iressed belief, and Secretary of Stale Christian A. Herter slated hope, lhal the Soviet premier's visit and lalks here will soften the freeze of the Cold War. Khrushchev made his com- ment to reporters shortly bo- foic he set out for a luncheon given by Herter in his honor. The affair was held only hours before Ihc start of Khrushchev's climactic man- lo-man lalks with President Eisenhower on a Maryland mountain top. As il in direct response llerler expressed his hope in a toasl at the luncheon itself. K hru shch ev was inlcr- i-lrjwcd briefly at the entrance lo the Soviet embassy when !ie vi.siU'd Iheii.' before going on In the llerler luncheon. "WE WILL KNOW more UT Ihe discussions with the the visiting Com- iiiinist chief snid. As for picking out ihe out- landing difficulty that ough; to be settled, Khrushchev said willi a chuckle: "II would be heller lo ask thill quest ion of your Pres- idcni." Khrushchev said he thinks tensions between the. two he lessened ;o some extent as a result of his visit. The encminlcr came on Ihr heels of morning-long strategy .sessions in which Khrushchev and Eisenhower, a shorl block i.pail, went over last-minute I ii n s for Ihc conferences u-hich will Insl inlo Sunday ;'i I he presidential retreat. Camp David. IN THE luncheon loast llerler slated his hope thai the weekend talks will create lo T allrd slipped and fallen on a he was pulling away in the. s. Marv Helen Scluiltz died wi sday. Marie SchuHz liui'sclav nifihl, 4 hours and -in minutes alter kitchen of his Chatham homiAsurgcry was completed. Wednesday. Dr. O'Connor said lhal al- though Munford is iilerl and responsive today, Ihe stroke will "materially delay his re- covery." MUNl'ORD'S DOC T O R S fa id Thursday he had hci-n sullering for several weeks from fatigue and nervous ex- haustion. Barnslablc Count y Dist. Ally. Edmund Dinis said after. 'he girls together weighed j pounds, 10 ounces al their VY lit? Visit The II hirlh four days ago. They were joined al Ihe abdomen.; They were nimble lo lake enough nourishment In sus- tain life. Dr. Willis J. Polls, .suigeon- in-chief of Children's Mcmor- to Gallery WASHINGTON Mrs. Ihc of world peace. "Wc also llerler said, "you will take back with you a good impression of Ihe United Suites, its peo- ple and way of life." Referring to the heclie schedule Khrushchev has fol- lowed since his arrival in the United Slates, llerler told his guest "we a d m i r e your Mamina." "In this shorl period you lave visited some of our ial Hospital, said surgery of- Nina Khrushchev today vis- fcrcd Iheir only chance the National Gallery and met n write your name, address and Social Security Number on a postcard and mail it to The Independent, Press-Telegram. G04 Pine Ave., Long Beach 12. When you win, bring identi- fication and Social Security card to The I, P-T. Here arc today's winners (deadline Monday. Sept. 28. S. BANDARANAIKE Critically Wounded 5fi4-I6-5fi2B (S50) 315-07-9291 (S25) 519-10-6022 547-50-5407 564-16-5629 (S15) 071-18-5540 556-22-1996 569-58-7082 216-09-1359 504-14-3458 Here are Thursday's win- ners (deadline Saturday. Sept. 26, 568-32-2287 510-16-3234 (S25) 483-22-3038 551-40-7952 040-16-7409 (515) 546-46-6074 559-10-2377 564-07-0159 530-16-1 (MS (S5) 552-22-5345 S47-58-090S members, all of, were Eugene Navy. The crew Anchorage, Slrous. pilot; Robert Pollom. copilot; Bryan Green, flight (Conlinued Page A-4, Col. 6) the Thursday of slab-wounding ot Mun- lArl, gift to the iiiition of one jbcr of local government offi- ford in his lavish summer home in Chatham, that it peared to have been suffered by accident. WHERE TO FIND IT Khrushchev al his wittiest and Van Cliburn at his kiss- icsl al gala rcreplion for; Premier al Russian embassy! in Washington. Story on Page1 M-DONALD SAYS Beach B-l. Hal A-15. A-15. D-2 to 12. B-4, 5. C-7. Death B-2. A-14. B-3. Shipping D-2. C-l to 6. A-12. 13. Tides, TV, D-l. Vital D-2. A-IS. B-6, 7. Your A-2. Steel Talks Collapse, No Date for Renewal NF.W YORK Negotiations lo setlle thr slrikc in the nation's vital steel industry broke down today. "Wc are going home." said David J. McDonald, presi- dent of the Steelworkers Union. "This farcical filibuster, on since May has ended." No dale was set for any renewal of Ihe talks, which began weeks before the strike began in mid-July. McDonald said the union would resume talks with the steel industry when it received "an honest offer worthy of consideration by self-respecting sleelworkers." Federal Mediator Joseph F. Finncgan indicated that when Ihc bargaining did resume it might be another city Washington, D. C. FINNEGAN SAID HE WOULD CONFER this week- end with bibor Secretary James P. Mitchell to "look al the over-all picture." R. Conrad Cooper, chief industry negotiator, had sug- gested that the bargaining resume here Monday. McDon- ald said that the union would not attend. Nfwsmsn asked Finncgan whether hr considered the union position a break-off in negotiations. "I'd rather not characterize it that he said. "We don't intend to let this thine drift, in view of in impact on 600.000 souls and its impact on the national economy." i r 'dais and private citizens" mrr iMTm-rmtocr Amcricn s "P" llcrtcr went on. "You have BUT, IN IHh COURSL was obviously cic- experienced differing the three-hour operation, WJth eight-member surgical team made Iwo discoveries: The! Mrs. Khrushchev, with her twins shared a single heart''laughters Rada and Julia, and a single liver. 'loured the gallery for an hour That meant that only one n could retain Ihc organs and sittia- luiiis jusi as persons in puliliciil lite meet them daily throughout this country. "Wc want you lo sec UK (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) be saved. The huge building, filled "There was no chance some of Ihc world's [grciilcsl arl and sculpluie, was built with million dol- lars given for Ilml purpose by Andrew Mellon, former secre- tary of Ihe treasury and am- bassador In Great Britain. Other millionaires havp domil- (Continued Page A-4, Col, C) (Sight Hurricane off Mexico SAN I-RANCISCO The Weather Bureau works lirl LA. Slaying Admitted by Cab Driver a hurricane in Ihe Pacific lo-i day about 700 miles west of I .a Mcx., in Lower Cali- fornia. I OS ANGKI.FS (tipn A t.ixicah driver conlessed to- id.iy he shot iind killed a 'A PINE ART Solll'i American im- 5. Khrushchev called ii.lporter in a robbery, police re- Writing a personal message The storm appeared to be tlie moving westward about five RUM( hook (hc wjfc of ported. Peter William Jones, 33, the cab driver. arrested Winds nea the center are lhc prCm'Cr learned ,JT, 70 nn 'MVCS picked .ip VidOr about 70 miles an hour, al ,hc Ambassador the gallery ns "a wonderful Hotel early Tuesday, museum." gale-force wind outward to 150 miles from the center. Weather- Low clouds and coast- al fogs clearing by mid- fore n o o n Saturday. Slightly warmer Satur- day. Maximum tempera- ture by noon today: 76. Many of the works were ac- 20-year-old importer Baranquilla, Colombia, quired by Mellon from lhc .was found dead near Elysian collections of Russia's royal family. While she smilingly gave her silent approval to most of Ihc paintings. Mrs. Khrush- chev brushed off an exhibi- (Continued Page A-4, Col. 3) Park later in the day. Jones at fust denied the killing but after intensive questioning, confessed, police said. Detectives said a .25- calibcr Itaiian automatic, found in Jones' apartment, was the death weapon.   

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