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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 23, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 23, 1959, Long Beach, California                             KIDNAPS MANAGER, TIES FAMILY IN HOME BANK BANDIFS BOMB PLOT FOILED The Southland's Finest Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1959 48 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 Vol.LXXil-No.200 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Khrushchev in i Mood on Corn Jaunt Jobs Turned Over to Air Force PREMIER KHRUSHCHEV gestures as he chats with Roswell Garst as they left Khrushchev's hotel in DCS Moines, Iowa, for visit to Garst's farm at nearby Coon Rapids today. Man in center is not Wirephoto.) MADE FREEDOM FLIGHT Beaten in S. F. Park SAN FRANCISCO Hungarian who helped hijack a plane to escape to the Free World and who spoke against Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev's visit here was found beaten and unconscious early today. COON RAPIDS, Iowa Nikila S. Khrushchev, tired hut happy-looking, arrived in .the heart of Iowa's tall corn country today and anoimccd This is going to be a jovial Don'tDelay Your Entry in Contest Another in cash is awarded today in The Press- Telegram's Lucky Social Se curity Numbers Contest. Don't delay in entering the cash contest. New winning numbers will be published each weekday. To enter, you simply write your name, address and Social Security number on a postcard and mail it to The Independent, Press-Telegram, 604 Pine Ave., Long Beach 12. Bring identification and Social Security card to The I, P-f if you win. Here are today's winners (deadline Friday, Sept. 25, 326-22-1313 551-16-4289 525-10-3040 562-22-6906 549-09-8999 549-09-2555 398-14-2806 550-10-4816 (S5) 487-03-6069 548-56-3704 258-18-4433 Here arc Tuesday's winners (deadline Thursday, Sept. 24 5 555-34-0052 509-18-951.0 526-36-1744 441-20-54S2 (SI 5) 511-18-1140 526-34-2256 319-20-0210 464-10-3539 548-58-5108 470-07-8985 (S5) 290-10-8879 Ferenc Isazk, 31-year-old president of the Hungarian Freedom Fighters of San Francisco, would say only, "I don't remember after police found him in Golden Gate Park. Officers said he seemed very frightened when he re- gained consciousness in an ambulance en route to an emergency hospital and feigned inability to speak English. He was reported in fair condition with multiple head, and other injuries. HIS WIFE, Enese, 26. had out after a mysterious tele- phone call and failed to return. "He seemed highly nervous after the she said. "He eft home in his car saying ic would be hack in a few minutes." Inspectors Charles Naugh- ton and Lloyd Kelly said the missing Hungarian patriot was found crumpled in front of his parked auto just inside an entrance to the park. Weather Low clouds late to- night and early Thurs- day, but sunny Thursday afternoon. Little change in temperature. The Khrushchev motorcade drove into the midst of a scene of enormous confusion and activity. Swarms of Army, Air Force, police and other se- curity people stood guard all over the farm of Roswell (Bob) Garst while feverish preparations proceeded for a bountiful luncheon under a huge brown tent In the farm- yard. Thousands of persons, in- cluding school children, had lined the route along Highway 141 from Dos Moines toward Coon Rapids. The children waved and cheered for the broadly beaming Communist boss. The Soviet premier gave no sign that he noticed a gray-haired woman standing (Continued Page A-5, Col. 4) Army, Navy Joltec by Project Switch by Defense Dept. WASHINGTON Defense Department desig nated the Air Force today t be America's future spac force. This was a jolt to th Army and Navy. The department turned ove to the Air Force sole militar responsibility for all "spac transportation" and space ve hide rocket boosters. Projects worth hundreds o millions of dollars, includin the Army Saturn booster, will be turne over to the Air Force, accorc ing to Dr. Herbert York, d: rector of research and engi neering. While the Army and Nav will develop specialized sal tellites for such purposes a navigation and communica lions, a Pentagon announce mcnl said, they will have t rely on the Air Force fo putting their space vehicle into orbit. tti IN ANNOUNCING th transfer of space projects t the Air Force, the Dcfens Department went a long way toward taking its Advanced Research Projects Agency out of the space business. ARPA, set up after the So- viets successfully fired their first Sputnik, will "largely and eventually" gel out of the space business, York said. But it will continue advanced re- search in other fields such as defense against ballistic mis silcs, solid fuels for rockets and high-temperature resist ant materials. AS A WOMAN HOSTAGE steps through a window to safely, police crouch on street outside ;i Cleveland branch bank today during a holdup attempt. Inside, a red-headed robber held the manager and several clerks as hostages. The hostages were released by the bandit, who was found dead in bank basement after exchange of gunfire with Wirephoto.) LIVING COSTS Food Price Cut Leads in Decline WASHINGTON government reported today: that living costs declined In August for the first time inl' After Duel With Police Kills Himself Nab Carbo, 4 Pals Ship Rams Rocks, 11 Crewmen Die LA CORUNA, Spain The Spanish fishing vessel Silvcira crashed onto the rocks near Cape Prior, 25 miles north of here, in heavy fog Tuesday night and sank. Eleven of the crew perished. ailed police when Isazk went NABBED, SEE HIM ANYWAY 170-m.p.h Typhoon Northwest of Guam GUAM Vcra, packing 170-mile-an-hour center winds, was 395 miles north northwest of Guam to- day, the Guam fleet weather station reported. 4 Teen Girls Sneak Up to K Penthouse DES MOINES DCS Moines teenage school- girls slipped through security officers at Hotel Fort DCS Moines Tuesday and made their way up 10 flights to the penthouse suite reserved for Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev. "How in the devil did you girls get up asked one of the security men who blocked the girls' path. THE TEENAGERS SAID they just walked up and saw no one but janitors and waiters on the stairs. The girls were sent back down on an elevator and in the lobby they met Khrushchev, who had just arrived at the hotel. The premier greeted each girl with a smile and said he was happy to sec them. The four were Robin Downey, Barbara Boots, Mary Jo Ferguson and Marge Landwehr. They said they had skipped school to see Khrushchev. six months. Lower prices for groceries offset increased costs of non- food items to account for the drop. The Labor Department's consumer price index fell one- tenth of 1 per cent to 121.8 per cent of average 1047-49 prices. However, the report noted the August figure was the highest ever for the month, eclipsing the 123.7 mark set last year. LOWER PRICES of fruit and vegetables, meat, poultry and fish led the decline. Prices of housing, clothing, trans- portation, medical cure, hair- cuts and beauty treatments increased last month, the de- partment said. Despite the drop in (he in dcx, about aircraft workers will receive pay raises of one to two cents an hour because of past increases in the government's yardstick. They include employes ol North American Aviation, Hughes Aircraft, the Martin Co. and Temco. CLEVELAND, Ohio A daring gunman kidnaped the manager of a branch of the Cleveland Trust Co. today ind tried to hold the banker's 'amily hostage in an unsuc- cessful robbery attempt. He shot himscH to death when curneicil by A woman accomplice mid mother man believed In- volved in the plot were sought )y police. 1 lr THE HONKER'S body was 'ound in the basement of the Missing Toddler Found Alive in Field CARROLLTON, Ohio (UPI) 20-monlh-old girl was found alive and well today in a corn field a short distance from where wandered away from her father's car Tuesday night. State highway patrolmen said the toddler, Sylvia Sle vano, was "a little scratched up" but otherwise well. The! youngster was found by 15- year-old Brice Finnicum of Carrollton, a member of an all-nighl search parly in in Plof to Seize Jordan's Purses Ov AMOdiited Pren Fratikie Carbo, the reputed underworld boss of box- ing, was ordered held in bond loday in Balti- more by U. S. Commissioner Ernest Volkarl on charges of trying to grab some of the earnings of world welter- weight champion Don Jordan. Carbo, was formally placed uncier arrest Tuesday night at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he checked In Monday night for "study and management of a chronic medical condition." the ar- raignment was conducted in his hospital room. He and (our other boxing world figures were indicted Ske Appeals for 'Harder1 Steel Talks WASHINGTON 'dcnl Eisenhower appealed to 'both sides in the steel strike Tuesday by a federal grand loday to "gel down to hard jury in }MS Angeles on intensive bargaining" and charges of conspiring to ex- settle the dispute. money from Jordan's I he appeal was relayed reporters by Secretary of of Covina, Calif., and Labor James P. Mitchell fol- lrom Leonard Blakely, also lowing a long conference with as Jilckic Leonard, a Eisenhower, j (Continued Page Col. 1) "We all feel that free leclive bargaining may be on trial here." Mitchell said. "Both management and la- bor should recognize this fact." HERBERT FOX Released Unharmed bank after an hour-long gun- fight with police. Bank em- ployes held captive in the bank cowered as the shots were exchanged. The robber had released the employes be- fore the final police fusillade. When no further shots were fired by the robber police en-f f lered the West Side branch' MITCHELL declined to pre- dict what government action, if any. would be taken if labor and management failed to reach a .settlement in the strike, now 71 days old. He likewise declined to pre- dict the liming of government action, should action be taken. The most probable govern- ment action would be invok- ing the Taft-Ilartley law's in- junction provision. An injunc- tion, if issued, would send the striking steel workers at least! WHERE TO FIND IT The series of misunder- standings and blunders that has upset Soviet Premier Khru.sbchev in his U.S. tour is reviewed on Page SO days, but they would be free to strike again if no set' bank and found him dead. He was reported to have shot himself. j (Continued Page Col. I) The slicknp began----------------- iWhcn one robber and a fe- male accomplice broke into Beach B-l. Hal B-9. C-fi to 12. B-10, II. B-12. Death B-2. B-8. B-3. Shipping A-2. C-l to 5. A-16. Tides, TV, A-24. B-9. B-4, 5, 6. Your A-2. jcludcd Mate patrolmen, hcimc of manaBcr Herbert iff's dnputios. civil defense lunits and volunteers. FOR THE PRESS, HAM SANDWICHES Mighty Nice Table Set for Nikita COON RAPIDS. Iowa folks out here in Iowa- set a mighty nice tihlc loday for Nikita Khrushchev. This was the luncheon fare for the Soviet premier at the farm home of Mr. and Mrs. Roswell (Bob) Garst: Baked sugar-cured ham. fried chicken and barbecued loin-back ribs. Peeled tomatoes stuffed with cottage cliche, cole slaw, sliced cucumbers stuffed with sour cream and cheese and decorated with green pepper slices. A relish tray of carrot sticks, celery- and green onions. Ripe and green olives. Dill picklrs Corn pudding. Apple pic and cheese. Assorted breads. Coffee. Mrs. Garst provided the tomatoes, potatoes, cucum- bers, peppers and corn from her own garden. She also put up the pickles. Remain- der of the food was pre- pared by DCS Moines cater- ers and trucked heie in spe- cial vans. The bread in- cluded a special white type liked by Russians. Cedar Rapids, Iowa, sent over some prize Concord grapes. There were 175 persons on the guest list, too many for even such hospitable people as the GarMs to do all the cook i n Three junior leaguers from Drs Moines helped with the serving. There was also a bar, im- partially serving vodka, Scotch and bourbon. Oh yes. the ehnrrh ladies and two daughters and lorced, Fox at gunpoint to drive them to the bank. BEFORE LEAVING, the robbers warned that a bomb (Continued Page A-5. Col. 3) 10 Battle Way Out of Prison; 6 Killed IBAGUE. Colombia Ten prisoners broke out of the penitentiary here Tuesday alter a battle in which four prisoners and two guards wore killed. Three prisoners wrrr. wounded. Three of the fugitives were of Coon Rapids fixed some Recaptured a few hours after ham sandwiches for the ,thc hrrak. but the other seven press 'Mill wore at larcr. Duke Snider to Join P-T Staff at Series Duke Snider, a talented gentleman both with a hat and a verb, will give readeis of the Press-Telegram an ex- clusive, inside story of the World Series beginning week from today. That is, if the Dodgers play in the World Series. Snider is well-qualified. He. holds II World Series records and countless awards The Duke of Fallbrook. a veteran of 13 years in the major leagues, knows base- ball's stars and strategies intimately. the Press-Telegram's baseball w.ter. George Ledercr, to give readers all thr background all the big plays of the big sones. Watch for Snider and Lederer, He'll join tcderer hfa-.namg   

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