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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 21, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 21, 1959, Long Beach, California                             PREMIER MEETS HARRY BRIDGES K Goes On Rubberneck Cruise of S. F. Harbor IKE PLEADS COURTESY TO K ON REST OF TOUR HELEN K. BLYTHE of San Francisco hustles to wind up her camera so that she might get a shot of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev as the visiting Russian leaves his Mark Hopkins Hotel for a stroll Wirephoto) Khrushchev With Union Men SAN I-RANCISCO Premier Nikita Khrushchev got inlo an uproarious and hot exchange wilh American union leaders laic Sunday night after receiving in San Francisco the warmest ptihlic recep- Iraqis Riot Over Mass Executions still Lebanon execution of BEIRUT, The mass Iraqi army officers and four former civilian leaders in Baghdad was reported today to have touched off wild dem oust rations against the regime of Iraqi Premier Abdel Karim Kasscm. Cairo Radio said thousand; of persons stormed through lion of his lour. Union chiefs were, arguing loday exactly Khrushchev said in Ihe com- motion but there was general agreement thai he did insist workers in Russia have the right to strike. Khrushchev blasted Waller Reuther, United Auto Work- ers Union president, as a "capitalist slooge" when Reuther asked him why he pretended only Communists wauled to help the working THE DINNER and argu- ment lasted for 3 hours and 15 minutes and encled shortly before midnight. Khrushchev Q5 IVUSSIColl SAN FRANCISCO Premier Nikita Khrushche took a sightseeing trip aroun San Francisco Bay in a Coas Guard cutter today and tol its skipper in a friendly con versation (hat the Russia Navy is concentrating on sub marines. The Communist leader em barked on a whirlwind day o rubber-necking, inspection o an eleclronic brain al an IBN plant and a visit to hcadquar :crs of Ihe International Lonj, shoremen Warehousemen' Union. At the ILWU hall, a nit morial lo workers killed i the San Francisco lO.'M ger eral strike, Khrushchev mo Harry Bridges whom th United Slates long sought I deport as a Communist. The Soviet leader's day started off with Iho. boat lour and on the deck of the cutter (Continued Page A-G, Col. 5) West Coast Visit Linked to Appeal President Seeks Friendly Parley, Hagerty Asserts WASHINGTON White House called anew to- day for the American people o be courteous to Soviei Vernier Nikita Khrushchev in lis cross-country tour. President Eisenhower wil >e aided in his desire for structive talks with the Rus sian leader if personal dis courtesy is avoided, the White House said. Press Secretary James C told newsmen thi President's "basic purpos  tional convention here but I' sident George Meany point !y stayed away from meet: :g Khrushchev. James the Electric Worl ;'rs Union, along with Reuther, 'ras a prime mover in arranp-sg the dinner. HELD a -brief- ing the siss on and '.-n of what gave his had hap- more strongly in control Kasscm than before. Syrian newspapers report-; ed today police tried to break up the demonstrations but' that thousands of men and women in the streets resisted. The army officers were ac- cused of laking parl in the anti-Kassem revolt al the northern city of Mosul last summer. The four civilians were accused of plotting against the Kasscm regime and of being enemies of the state. None of the victims was well known outside Iraq, hut they were reported strongly anti-Communist. penc P'-.lher said he asked Kruinivjhev: "I would like to know what a Soviet worker (Continued Page A-6. Col. 1) WASHINGTON Ml Charles E. Bohlen. now U.S. ambassador to Ihe Philip- pines, today was named spe- cial assislanl on affairs to Secretary of State Christian A. Hcrter. Bohlen, w h o is callec served for four years as the U.S ambassador in Moscow, this country's most trying diplo malic post. Even the Rus sians respected him as an ex pert on Soviet affairs. The State Department an- nouncement said that while no definite date has been set for Bohlen's return to Wash THIS PURPOSE of con structive meetings at Cam David is not served by an personal discourtesy extenc ed to the chairman during hi visit throughout our conn Hagerty said. The President, In his na tionwidc radio-television ad dress Sept. 10, said he ha "every confidence that ou people will greet Mr. Khrush chev and his wife and famil; w i I h traditional America courtesy and dignity." Hagcrly, asked by a report er about Khrushchev's reac lions lo his West Coast re ception, said: "The President's basic pur pose and desire is to hav Chairman Khrushchev se our country prior to the dis cussions of mutual intere.s thai he will have with him a Camp David this weekend. "THE PRESIDENT is look ing forward to Ihese discus sions and as he has said be 'ore, hopes thai they can b Hagerty addec Hagerty made the con' ment when asked whether th President felt any need for new statement calling upo the American people lo b courteous to the premier. He was asked whether such a statement was fell neces- sary in view of Khrushchev's blow-up over remarks made lo him Saturday night by Los Angeles Mayor Nor.'is Poul- son and by some other inci- dents which have arisen since Khrushchev began his coast- to-coast swing. ington, assume he his is expected to new duties here before the end of October. ADMIT THEFT Weather Night and morning low clouds, but mostly sunny Tuesday after- noon. T.ittle change in temperature. 'Golden Mother Held as Shoplifters The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1959 34 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 Vol. 198 ,-nrv, CLASSIFIED UE 2-5050 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Two Trucks, Auto Crash; Eight Perish Tractor Unit Hit Head on, Burns; Only Two Survive PETERSBURG, Va. (M- Eight persons were killed and two others critically injured early today in a spectaculai hrcp-vohicle collision on a ilraight stretch of US near here. Involved in the smashup were a pickup truck, a car carrying eight men and a Irac tor-trailer. Seven of the car's occupants were killed. Police said it appeared the westbound car was attempt ing to pass the pickup hut nslead collided wilh an on coming tractor-trailer, whicf jackknifed and burst into flames. ALL THREE vehicle- blocked the road and wreck age strewn about the highway kept the road impassable foi traffic for nearly four hours The car overturned but the milk truck the only vehicle lo burn. Killed in the smashup were Martin Isaacs Handy, -tl Amelia, Va., driver of the tractor-trailer. Richard Folder, 30, Peters burg, owner of Ihe car. Also killed wore the follow ing passengers in Folder's vc liicle: Ronald Eugene Jones 20; Donald Ray Couch, 19 Charles Davis Smith Jr., IS: Nathaniel Lee Calibano, 36; Midge Castle, no age given; and Ted Ruv.letl, 28, all of Petersburg. The lone occupant of the car' to survive was John Jakcr, 17, of Petersburg, and ic was lislcd in critical con- lition al a hospital here. Jesse Moody, about of Sutherland. Va., was Ihe lone iccupanl of the pickup truck. He also was critically hurt. Young Divorcee Murdered; Body Thrown Off Ship MISS LYNN KAUFFMAN, whose body was found on an island in Huston Harbor shortly after she was reported missing from a ship arriving from Ihe Orient, is shown in a WHEN he was ASKED speaking whether for the President with respect lo the courtesy matter, Hagerty said he was "speaking as press secretary answering ques- tions." He also declined to go any further than he did in his statement. Poulson touched off a tirade by Khrushchev by questioning Ihe premier about his famous remark that "we will bury you." 15-Cent Cut Railroad in SOUTH BEND. Ind. former Purdue Univer- sity "Golden Girl" and her school teacher- mother pleaded guilty to shoplift- ing charges loday in South Bend City Court. Sandra Hutchison. 21, Sawyer. Mich., and her mother. Mrs. Shirley Hutch- ison. 47. admitted stealing SI 1.77 worth of merchan- dise from Robertson's De- partment Store here Satur- day. .ludpc r d w a r d OlczaK delayed sentence on Ihe pelit larceny charges unlil Pay Sought Ocl. 21, saying. "My imme- diate reaction is to give Ihem a jail sentence, but it appears justice can be bet- ter served throush a pre- senlence investigation." Miss Hutchison, w h o t plans to return to Purdue workers this fall as a senior. .tries, the "Golden Girl" who led band formations in the I95K and football .seasons. She appeared as a silvor- baton fwirlor CHICAGO The na- tion's railroads loday notified their non-operaling employes of a proposed 15 cents an hour wage cut. The reduction, manage- ment said, would bring wages in line wilh straight time hourly earnings of production in all olhcr indus- WHERE TO FIND IT Khrushchev's dream of U. S. triumph fades, writes Waller Bidder on Page A-7. Beach B-l. Hal B-7. B-7. D-2 to D-7. C-6, 7. C-6. B-6. Shipping D-2. C-l to C-5. A-8. Tides, TV, D-8. B-7. B-4, 5. Your A-2. Still Time to Win in Contest Il's still not loo late to join The Press-Telegram's exciting Lucky Social Securily Mum- :jcrs Contest. More cash winners will announced each day this week as they arc loday. You can enter by writing your name, address and Social card and mailing il to The In- Icpcndonl, Press -Telegram, 601 Pine Avc., Long Beach 12. If you are declared a cash winner, bring identification and your Social Socurily card lo The I.P-T. Here are today's winning numbers (deadline Wednes- day, Sopl. ,r> 554-54-2044 5.17-54-9936 555-09-6288 555-01-1029 551-16-6608 5.-t2-3fl-l088 501-09-993.1 548-12-1178 5.H-26-45fi4 550-10-8760 565-44-2174 J. S. Charges ted China Is UnfitforU.N. Aid Gives Slashing Attack Against Seating in Assembly UNITED NATIONS The United Slates today de- scribed Red China as an oul- aw which has made itself otaly unfit for U.N. member- ship by mass murder, alroci- ies and aggression. In a slashing attack on the 'cipins regime, former U. S. Asst. Secretary of Stale Wai- er S. Robertson told the U.N. General Assembly that the sealing of the Chinese Com- minisls would he a mockery of Ihe U.N. charter. "Uy every standard of na- ional and international con- he as.serled. "the Red of Pciping is an out- aw. "IT HAS perpetrated mass uurder and slavery upon MS :iwn people. "II has confiscated without compensation hundreds of millions nf diilliii.i of the properly of other nationals. It has thrown foreign citizens inlo jail without trial and sub- jected many of them to un- human tortures. "In nine yeiirs it has pro- milled six foreign or civil wars Korea. Tibel, Indo- china, Hie Philippines, Malaya and Laos. It continues to defy the United Nalions do- I'ision 10 reunify Korea. II has flagrantly violated the YORK pro ty Chicago divorcee whose sovciely bealen body was washed ashore Saturday may have been murdered because she happened upon a plot loi (Continued Page A-li. Col. I) smuggle opium into Ihe Unit-' cd Slates, investigators said I today. I Narcotics and T r c a s u r y agents were questioning offi- cers nnd crow members of Hie Dutch freighter Utrecht, cm which Lynn Kauffman.' petite daughter of Chicago businessman, was returning home from Singa- pore when she was savagely beaten and hurled overboard lofl (S25) (SI 5) (SI5) 
                            

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