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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 18, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 18, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Khrushchev Pays Visit to Roosevelt's Estate PREMIER KHRUSHCHEV bends to place a wreath of tribute at the grave of former President Franklin D. Roosevelt at Hyde Park, N. Y., today. Assist- ing him is Mikhail Menshikov, Soviet ambassador to U. Wirephoto.) 46 Miners Trapped in Blazing Pit KIRKINTILLOCII, Scotland HYDE PARK. N. Y. Soviet Premier Nikila S.'. Khrushchev made a brief, 57-. minute tour today' of Presi- dent Franklin D. Roosevelt's estate here, on a pilgrimage to visit the grave of the So- viet Union's strong wartime ally. i The president's Eleanor Roosevelt, was stand-1 Season's 1st Storm Rips North Calif. LAST VANGUARD FIRED, SATELLITE IS IN ORBIT Revives U.S. Prestige in Space Field Once Scapegoat, Vehicle's History Ends in Triumph GAPE CANAVERAL. Fla. Vanguard 111 satel- lite soared into orbit today and revived sagging U. S. prestige in the space explora- tion field.' The 100-pound satellite was boosted aloft by the last of the Vanguard rockets. The Vanguard, once the scape- goat, for American space fail- ures, thus ended its hard luck history on a triumphant note. The success followed two straight American s p c e flops. Just 14 hours before, Thor-Able rocket in an attempt to plnce a 265- pound navigation satellite in orbit. On Wednesday, a Jupiter missile carrying mice and frogs on a space flight exploded l.OOn leel above it? launching pad. HOME the Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1959 Vol. 194 PRICE 10 'CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 46 PAGES CLASSIFIED UE 2-5959 EDITION (Six Editions Peaceful Co-existence? to Burial in Your Own Backyard! THE FLOPS came while Soviel P r c m i e r Nikita Khrushchev visited this coun- in th of a mile quarter ground. Hope of saving them faded rapidly. One man staggered from (he inferno to safely. Rescuers dragged out dead miner. He had suffo- cated. pulled up at a.m. Alter Khrushchev, accom- panied by his wife, Nina, bad laid a wreath of roses on the N" M- forma today. Drenching rains and winds i up to HO miles an hour with put up in II tries by (he Vr ,sian moon strike. The satellite was the llii Scores nf snhhinp up lo at least grave, Mrs. Roosevelt tucked i two fishing boals and threat- Khrushchev's arm in ened a third, flooded city in- hers and conducted Ihe couple! mostly wives, daughters and morjal ,jb whcrc sisters of the of (he Roosevcll cnrccr doomed men-crowded near arc am) the mine opening. a Mop at veil's cottage, TIME AND AGAIN they aw.iy h saw firemen and rescue teams; on a quick tour of the facilities and triggered a veil ancestral home, the me rash of minor traffic acci- dents. The storm began (o move inland and south late Tluus Mrs. rrom a off the about four Oregon coast. H moved south KHRUSHCHEV DIDN'T through San Francisco this morning and was oxpected to reach l.os Angeles in dimin- guard. It includes the 50- pound payload and the 50- pound third stage rocket, which remained at inched. Its job was to measuic (he earth's magnetic field, snlnrl Glatman Put Sto Death in San Quentin 'ELSE THERE'LL BE WAR' X rays, micronielcorilc bom-, bardmcnt and inside and outside the salel- lite. Shaped like an Ice cream .QUtNTlN M' a Tensions Must End, Nikita Warns U. N. UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev lold the United Nations General! -Har.j today tensions in iniernationnl relations must I l.os whcre [hc AF Relieves General Over Iceland Row of the volunteers, are terrible." beaten back by the heat, and the acrid fumes. evcn havc time for the cup of jshcd strength'lale today. It will he a miracle if coffcc tha, awailcd al WcM an of rain they are alive." gasped' one He did manage toihad fallen in parts of North-j 'The fumes sped Before heiern California by dnwn to-! 'stepped into the limousinclday. The weatherman'said ill The mine, one of Britain's; I would prohahlv rain in thn1 nationalized collieries, is lo-1 (Continued Page A-L Col. 3) cated within 10 miles of Glasgow. Trouble started this morn- ing when n huge electric ex- haust fan hurst into flame, spreading fire to the timbered props and girders. cone, Vanguard III is made (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) AS THE FLAMES ale through, the props collapsed. Stocks Drop Sharply in Early Mart Bay Area all day. o v SNOW FELL this morning in the northern High Sierra and temporarily closed the Prize Surprise to Winner George E. Hanlcy, of fi.lfil television repairman-..- who kept his own l photographic record of Ihreej V pnOOll IVIIIS 64. Moves on u Wi- Pnlchard has war. a major address the lovely models he raped and murdered on a .Southern Cali- fornia desert, went lo his death calmly today in Sail; Quentin Prison's gas chamber. Glalman, .'11, just -IS in in- world organization, Ihe Soviet Communist boss said: ibern relieved of his command 'in Iceland in the wake of 'Airport incident that raised Red Island Ihe 20th Century il is! Icelandic feelings against American forces there. I Prllchurd was commander impossible to undertake cru- the air base al Keflavik sades as medival families didjwhere two Icelandic officials with lire and sword reported to have been to lie in mud Lassen Loop section of Slate1 Indiana Ave., who didn't Highway 89 near Ml. Lassen. .There was snow on the foot Ebbets Pass and Sonora Pass roads across the. Sierra. know his wife had placed his. Social Security number in the earth. sing cascades of stone tumbled again today in i early trading. Steel, auto and NEW YORK IM Stock The forecast was for snow Lucky Num- later today at about the These falls partly blocked "I1 issllcs wcre among the (Continued Page A-4, Col. 4) the passages. More men would have been biggest losers. much as a share. The the in the mine had it not heenir for a strike which cnded'inK Pacc Pickccl UP Thursday. The majority of deepened and thetick- 900 men employed at the cr fel1 bchlnd flonr transac- mine stayed away despite linns for aooul minutes. the settlement. They planned to return to work Monday. eather C o n s i derable cloudi- ness with a chance of light rain tonight. De- creasing cloudiness Sat- urday becoming sunny in the afternoon. Tempera- ture at noon: 76. A few key issues lost as Strong Earthquake in Mexico Recorded BERKELEY A strong earthquake struck Thursday afternoon somewhere in deso- (jjlate northwestern Mexico or possibly under the Gulf of Some stocks turned upwan afterwards. During the 12 previous hers contest, collected h i s winnings Thursday. H a n I e y maintains his____ wife, who also submitted TOKYO Sar ah bore down on Soviet-held confronting humanily with by utcs before entering Ihe Islam, (otlay Rrcntcst jn 'puddles. green-walled chamber, (H South Koreans 'nc ac asserted to Associate Wardon'causing a million dollars dam- D. Achuff his desii'e American military in Ihe same auditorium was taken at Ihe request of the Icelandic government, an Air Force nothing be done In his behalf. ;s irean de.id m Ht ,i me u Tin- 87 killed. where Ihe Soviel Union was11 Cn-i condemned three years aRnlspolcesmnn said in answer to were fishermen. jinr Hussum suppression''llcslions- Korean dead raisi.il Hungarian revolulion, Icelandic Ambassador Thor 111! soviet premier deplored haci a tormal pro- from his cell lo the 124 injured in the storm's' world anxiety caused bylpsl ''10 Slate Department. he remarked thai whal sweep -ecurrent brush fire fighting. x pcned to him was his own: fault. Glalman had made no effort whatever to delay his execu- tion for crimes Superior Court ithp East China nnd Japan Judge called John A. Hewicker 'so revolting there is THE U. S. Air Force ported damage "THE COLD WAR cannot HE SAID American guards al Ihe base had forced the continue any Khrush-jtwo officials at gunpoint to rfl' chcv declared. 'lie in puddles of water for 10 a'' "The time has come for minutes and threatened (o Itaxuke Base in the Japanese'Ullilcd pfforls island of Kyushu 115 miles ,n siip-lmnuths. if they opened their southeast of Korea, where only one 20 Pf ten' of'he own number, plans to "lay After hearing Judge Hew- claim to some of the win- ickcr's sentence in San Die-go :es- sions this month the Associ- average Baja California. nings." The rest, he says. Glatman matter-of- will spend at his fa'voritcifactly told reporters. "It's pastime of gin rummy. To become eligible buildings were damaged or destroyed. The 1 15-mile-an-hotir winds plcmented by the efforts of The contention of the guard the heads of states. that the two officials had up about what I wanted." print seismographs al the ated Press GO-stock has advanced only 3 days.isity here, the California The decline has amounted tojtute of Technology in about SI3 as the index fell to'dena and in San Diego, within of its 1959 low. Dr. Don Tocher. UC Brokers cited to Ihe and lower department storejthat caused damage in sales than a year ago as !ac-JFrancisco two tors behind the selling. years ago. The quake registered on h i.vour name, address and Social I VI Univci- 't- !Sccurily numncr ;waves in Pusan. port city in proles, the southern tip of the Ko- rean peninsula. More than 15.000 homes were washed nL f S HE REJECTED a jury trial on a Pleaded guilty card and mail il to The Hewickcr to the Pusan was Independent, of Mrs- Rllln U. S. Military Sea Trans- Pine Ave., Long Beach. Merrado. 24, and Mrs. Service building Was i If vou qualify for one of [Ann Bridgeforri, 24. boih ccn, wrecked. A U. S. ff H ,i "1C, cash you need onlyiAngelcs models, in San and u wcrc layoffs due to the steel strike was about equa to the rmmiv c jbnng vour mdcntificntion and County. department store that caused damage in San! n0 -.HmiimH ranino j u if Social Security card to. 'le aomiiico aiso raping and one-hair j p.T judiih Ann Here are today's West Hollywood (deadline Monday, Sept. 21.-model, in Riverside County. Pasa-: chcv lold the audience of Centered a restricted area, hushed delegates. j pntchard had been in com- The Nationalist C h i n e s for only .ibout two boycotted against his appearance. Khrushchev, in turn, asked Ihe United Nations to end the. ntation of in Ihe U. N. in favor Red Chinese. The Air Force spokesman said no new assignment for Prilchaid had been decided a n d no successor ap- pointed. The Americans never have been too popular in Iceland THERE WAS a p p I e lhey from the Soviet block af hjlp 'n dc" jfcnsc of Jhe North Atlantic (Continued Page A-4, Col. 2) 'Treaty bastion. MOAN AS PADDLING BAN ENDS Kids 'Spenk' Spanking New Law ELUDE SEARCHERS 15 HOURS SACRAMENTO OJPI) California's spanking new law for handling unruly students went into effect today. And most youngslers clenrly seem to feel the law hits too clo'.c to home. ALMOST ALL Ihe kids who carrd enouch to fire off notes to Gov. Edmund G. Brown said they 'bought it was a crying shame. The new requires lo- cal school riiMncls to makf it clear whrrhrr a fachfr should use psychniogy or psfldle to Tfcroe dsfciphne. The low has been loosely inter- preted as re enforcing teachers' r i g t h s to use corporal punishment. A fifth grader in San 1-rancisco was so preoccu- pied about the impending calamity that he momen- tarily lost his grip on spell- ing in a letter to the "honorable "Some of the teachers scrcm at at a child. As I allway say a dnld should not sp.ink a notlier child. I knew a toarhrr who wouid puil vmi frf off I the teachers for ppanking childrrr The misspelhnp affliction spread lo Los Angeles, where another boy ob- served: "I am R years old I thimk grils and boy shall not be spenk at shool. Gnl and boy shall be spenk at home. Because they mite tpcnk us too hard.'1 BUT Marion Isaac, a fifth pnrler, wat sure the law was merely another svmpiom of pnst- sputnik hysteria: "If this K the land of democracy why do ve have spanking nsam? "It hrip us outdo the RussMnv" 1950) 547-54-5232 (S50) 460-18-4408 (S25) 567-34-0181 328-03-2044 (SIS) 547-18-8936 390-14-4473 (S15) 366-32-0208 458-09-8581 569-26-5083 525-42-7624 526-22-1913 Here are Thursday's num- bers (deadline Saturday Sept. 10, 569-58-5755 545-12-0662 550-10-7539 551-32-4664 514-38-5554 563-07-3252 549-09-5679 503-14-9289 557-54-4I33 SfiI-03-7532 515-41-8178 WHERE TO FIND IT Several thousand new laws, signed by Gov. Brown, went into effect in California today. Story on Page A-8. Beach B-l. Hal B-I1. B-l I. D-l to 12. C-6. 7. D-2. Death B-2. B-lfl. B-3. Shipping D-2. C-l-5. B-8. Tides, TV, Page C-10. Vital B-12. B-H. B-4-5. Your A-2. 2 Missing Gardena Girls Found GARDENA Dirty and disheveled, two girls missing lor nearly 15 hours were lound trriay after they spent most of the night playing seek with their parents, po- lice and other Kathleen Louise H.iker. 1R227 Dalton Ave.. and LaNea Blanche Ilanmrr. LS'ifi W. 162nd Si.. found by police trudcinR along 227th St. near ker Ave nearlv fivr miles from thrir hornet. THE PAIR h.id hern spoiled earlier by Mrs. Marif Runrh. tracbrr at Dcnkf-r Avc. Sc'ionl, "here the giris t.r? fitth- graders. She summoned po- lice when she arrived at school and learned thnt the girls had been missing since (i p.m. Thursday. The chubby youngsters told officers that they had spent the night in the vicin- ity of Artcsia Blvd. and Western Ave. They said they saw their parents and police several times and hid when they did so. They said they feared punish- for staying out so late. With tear-stained faces, lhey contritely told of plans to walk to the Palos Wriles Hills to ramp out. "Wr h.id lived in the same houses all our lives nrd pettmj; lired of being in the same the girls told newsmen. The youngsters hid out after spending the late aft- ernoon riding horse? at the home of a classmate, Do- lores Sponseller, 1752 Ar- tesia Ave. PARENTS SAID the girls had never run away before, hut had been disciplined for staying away from home until after dark. When found, thr Hamner girl was clad in a brown and white dress and was barefoot, having lost san- dals she had been wearing earlier Her companion was clad in a black jumper, whitt blouse and oxfords.   

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