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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 17, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 17, 1959, Long Beach, California                             X15 IN FIRST RIGHT ON OWN POWER IT HURTS Larry Perkinson, 5, is all bandaged up after treat- ment at an Indianapolis hospital. Larry, who wan- dered into a neighbor's garage, was bitten around the mouth and eye by a dog. Police said the dog did not appear to be vicious but it might be hard to convince Wirephoto.) FRATERNITY HAZING FATAL The Southland's Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, SEPT. 17, 1959 Vol. 195 PRICE 10 CEN1S TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 60'PAGES CLASSIFIED UE 2-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Khrushchev in Big City, Hails Ike as 'Great Man LOS ANGELES student being initiated into Kappa Sigma Fraternity al. the University of Southern California choked to death today on a large piece of raw meat he was forced to eal. Authorities said the victim, Richard T. Swanson, 21, son of a Los Angeles dentist, :irobably could have been saved if members ol Ihc fra- lernily had not. misled am- inilancc atlendnats and fire- men as lo what had occurred. "I asked Ibe boys if he had eaten said ambu- lance attendant Nathan Rubin who was called to Ihe Kappa Sigma house. "They told me no. 1 got practically no co- operalion al all. "IF I'D ONLY known be to fro Guide System Fails CAPE CANAVERAL, Flu. Uniled Stales failed today to put into orbil a satel- lite designed for experiment- in.-, a global navigation system. More than an hour after a three-stage launching vehicle lifted Ihe satellite from Cape Canaveral the Defense De- partment in Washington an nounced that the Ihird stage apparently had failed to work. A BRIEF announcement said: "Since confirming data has not been received it must be assumed that the satellite clidj not go into orbil." The satellite, riding on a combination Thor Able launcher, lifted cleanly off Ihe pad at Canaveral at a.m. The second stage rockcl en- gine fired on schedule. THE ADVANCED Research and Projects Administration had said the new navigalion system if it worked would be more accurate than any sys- tems now available. The satellite, called Tran- sit I, was designed to explore Ihe, feasibility of using satel- lites as navigation stations in space. These satellites would provide aerial and maritime navigators with a reliable, all- wealher means of fixing Iheir Had Courage to Invite Me, Russian Says Red Leader Given Quiet Welcome by Massive Throng By WILLIAM L. RVAN NEW YORK Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev hailed President Eisenhower today as a "great man" who had the courage and wisdom to invilc the leader of world communism lo Ihe United Slates. "I am aware, some politi- cians in this country are dis- pleased by this step taken by the President of Ibis country, but il needed a great man to look further ahead instead of those, who are unable lo see any further than (heir the Soviet leader said. is a man's greatness lo be able to sec loday and to be also able lo see future pros- pects and thai the prospects should be clear for his na- tion." ti it- KHRUSHCHEV MADE the remarks al a luncheon in his honor al Ihe Commodore Ho- tel, given by Mayor Roberl F. EISENHOWERS AT THE RUSSIAN EMBASSY President and Mrs. Eisenhower and their daughter-in-law, Mrs. Hnrbara Eisenhower, pose Wednesday night at the Russian embassy in Washington with Soviet Premier and Mrs. Khrushchev. The Klmishchcvs, who loday traveled by train to New York, were hosts at a slate Wirephoin.) had eaten something 1 on behalf of ihe Cily, possibly have saved him. I of J 'corned the Soviet lea1 U.N.HearsNIKITA rELLS 'Time prepared for such an emergency. I had an extractor and could have removed whatever it was in his throat. If only someone had told me. I was working in the dark and didn't have a chance. Neither did the kid." Swanson died on Ihc way lo Central Receiving Hospital. Al the hospital Dr. Melvin quietly and particu- lar enthusiasm on the second leg of bis lour. Mostly il was a massive, polite silence, punctuated by a few cheers and by some shouts of "murderer" and placards reading: "Nikie, Go t.o the Leave New York for Us." Plan for Parley UNITED NATIONS. N. Y. The Uniled States and Britain sought loday In lake the edge off Nikilii Khrush- Goldy removed a quarter Eighty thousand persons a pound of meat from the watched as Khrushchev rode chev's United Nations appear- the fraternity Swanson was hospital. They turn the stuJenl on his back to administer oxygen. But Knill said: "Some of the boys said, 'leave him alone, we wanl him on his stomach.' I asked position and course. plotting their Report India Flood Toll in Hundreds student's throat. V :i 4 FIREMEN Jack Knill and Bill Parker, members of a al house taken before to the attempted to ance by calling for broad! West negotiations, in- Fast they were doctors. Theylneeded wisdom and from Pennsylvania Station to Ihc Hotel Waldorf-Astoria and Ihen lo Ihe Hotel Commodore for Ihc official city reception, chief police Inspeclor Thomas A. Nielson made (he crowd estimate at p.m. Concerning Eisenhower, the. Russian leader said: "I have always esteemed your President and I do so to an even greater degree now. To have invited Khrush- chev to the United Stales eal. military and economic said, "no. we're lifeguards.' The firemen finally turned power and understanding of Ihc need lo place the relations Swanson over and put the between our countries on a oxygen mask lo his face butjsound basis." to no avail. POLICE Sgt. R. Thomp- son said 11 pledges were being initialed. He said he learned that after doing nu- KHRUSHCHEV DREW a loud laugh from the audience at the luncheon when he said of course there were other reasons why he was invited. of Cold War Starts to Crumble' WASHINGTON ice of the cold war lias Leff fo Get on Cash List Want lo try in The Press your lucl Telegram's tint nnly shown signs of ;i crack hut has started lo Lucky Numbers contest? crtnnble, Sovicl Premier Nikila S. Khrushchev said in It's not ton late to estab- cxchunciiiE loasls with President Eisenhower. eligibility and per- "Allhoiigh this wine win I1'11'1 lnc being given away daily. Prinl ynir name, address number disarmament. On (he eve of the Soviet premier's address, Secretary of State Christian A. Herter laid before Ihe 82-nalion Gen- eral Assembly a program ofj lalks designed lo bring ahonl peaceful change in Ihc politi- Typhoon Hits in Asia, 23 Lose Lives (l and Social Scuirily anil mail it lo Independent. Press-l'ele- Avo- Be.ii h TOKYO Typhoon fields. British foreign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd outlined in de- tail a new three-stage disarm- ament plan which he said could become the basis for a fresh slated early next year. start in lo begin arms talks in Geneva merous pushups they were marched to a table, blindfoldsikind i KHRUSHCHEV already "You wanted to sec whatihad indicated he will submit of a man Khrushchev 10 Ihe U. N. a new disarma- removed and pieces of (Continucd pagc A.5, Col. soaked in oil, were placed be fore them. Six of Ihe youths managed. to swallow the meat and then! Swanson tried. Thompson] (Continued Page A-fi, Col. S) Bomb Calls Precede BOMBAY, India Flood said be was told A Kl tned five times and on thc'IY I IVUI III the meat voters today poured into thei city of Surat, 160 miles north attcmpl of "Bombay and firsl rcporlsjlodgcd in his throat said hundreds of persons were fell gasping to the floor, drowned. An ancient wall protecting he THOMPSON said at NEW YORK Khiushchev said as hr raised a glass of at an embassy Wednesday night, "may   was flown loday, mach 2 would be about I.'IOO miles per hour. Crossficld said the thing that bothered him most on the flight was missing break- last. "On this base there's no place open to eal at Ihc hour HI which we have to begin flight preparations." OTII WISE, he said, nothing about the flight troubled him. He reported that the plane "handled ibcautifully" at supersonic, speed. Asked how he fell when ihe (Continued Page A-fi. Col He said he hoped Ihe ex-', its'changc visits with the Presi 'will further a waiml and .South Korea day, leaving dead on 'northeasterly path into Japan Sea. Japanese reports listed (i dead on Ihe liny Japanese island of Miyako. 200 southwest of Okinawa. U; not say which of dead in other areas of Japan issues he thought we. e has not only signs of a crack miles crumble already shown hut has Me did e cold YOUH number lo clan numbers Saturday. Sept. (SSII) (S2.ri) (Sis) and 3 dead in Pusan, South crumbling. F.ISFA'IIOWKR SAID in hi'- toast, lo Khrushchev Hint hr 1) holcl. adjacent to I6.350 persons were home- less. A report from Yosii, on Ihe scares today preceded Soviet 'Grand Central Terminal, was Korean with coast, said 617 Premier Nikila S. t h c chev's arrival in New York. cily collapsed and several members ofi An anonymous caller lelc- bepun immediately. Police had just completed cmo search of the hotel inlhomes swamped nt the River Tapti swirled inlo'l'ne fralernitv w-ere ink! in'pinvird the Hotel Commodore, iresponsr lo a similar warning! Newspaper.; Ihe. mam bazaar, it was unlii officers could ques-jwhorc Khrushchev is to al Wednesday night. The search [heavy damage tion them. Hut the officeritend a civic luncheon, and dc-jproduced no (race of a bomb.jrea's rice crop, flue for bar- Within five, fporls said minutes, the said ihey fled when Gary a twn-styiiarciLbcrharl. prcsidcni of the In- riiie area was inundated. Theiterfralernity Council at USC, said: "Get of here ami u-jfer 12 feet deep some places. Many wrrf re.xirtcd inUppeared and Get out omri." clarrd: 1 ne faller Wednesday night "Get all Americans out. of i told the hotel: there. A bomb is going off." A switchboard operator look the call at a.m. A search of ihe Korea. Winds up Ic 100 miles an hour demolished thousands of homes. I At leasl 17 Japanese (Continued Page A-... (.ol ing boats with 60 crew mem-j hers were reported missing WHERE TO FIND IT in the Japan Sea. President Eisenhower s.iys he's sure Khrushchev .share.'. IN PUSAN, police said feeling that war is futile; homes were wrecked, ilp there's still room, damaged. 87 washed Page and submerged. They said] '._____. Beach B-I. Hal A-23. A-23. B-IO. II. A-IS. Death B-2. A-22. B-3. Shipping A-It. C-l to 6. A-20. Tides, TV, C-l 4. Vital C-V. Women--Pages B 1 tn S. (SIS) (SS) (S3) llepe aie Wednesday's mini hers (deadline luday, Sept homes were destroyed or] damaged and about I predicted, lo South Ko- "Get yourself and all niher said the typhoon Americans out of Ihe southern have planted ibrce bombs j Island or northern Honshu vest within a mi nlh. U.S. Air force weathermen will hil Hokkaido i Island Friday. IM.Vi. -i p sr.R-58-9.ino 5-I8-5G-923I S37-32-27-1R 332-20-3111 312-3.0-0.122 .r.7l-l 6-9128 OSS-lfi-18-IK 550-IO-2S69 (SSO) (S2S) (Sis) (Sis) (SIS) tss) (S5) eather cloudiness (o- niRht and Friday. Light showers possible late Friday. T.ittle fhanRC in tempcrritiirr. Steel Talks Open Under Ike Prodding NI-W YORK steel-strike negotiators met today under renewed plodding by President Eisen- hower lo gel about the busi- ness of sealing the 65-day .ilUout. Hsenhower a new1; in Washington he had offered 
                            

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