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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 15, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 15, 1959, Long Beach, California                             KHRUSHCHEV BEGINS HI VISIT WITH MOON RACE Russian Open Word Battle Early Red Chief's Plane Delayed by Wind, Is 50 Minutes Late The Evening Ntmpaptr LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER Vol. 'LXXII-NO; 193 PRICEIO CENTS TELEPHONE HE s-im 34.PAGES CLASSIFIED HE HOME EDITION :jSix Editions SOVIET PREMIER Nikita Khrushchev and President Eisenhower, hat over his heart, are serious today during playing of U. S. and Russian national an- at Andrews Air Force photo.) 6 Killed, 18 Hurt by Bomb Blast in Texas School .HOUSTON explosion which police fear may- have been, set off- by a homemade bomb, shook Elementary School today. Police dispatchers sald'at .least six children and adults were killed and least 18 injured. The FBI was called.in after achers and students said a an carrying a suitcase was n the campus at the time of e explosion. Emergency rooms at three ospitals were filled with the jured. Authorities called ad- itional doctors in.for emer- Gun; WASHINGTON wi con gres> closed out its long and the Democratic majority -7-often- frutrating 1959 ses- sio'n early today. Final adjournment came only-five hours before Pre- mier Nikita S, Khrushchev waf due in Washington. The House quit at a.m and.the always more leisurely Senfete hurried to quit three minutes' later, ending the lorjgVst; continuous session since-.lhe Korean War yeai of Tipsj: An, hour before adjourning Senate leaders woke Presi dent-Eisenhower with a cal toIlhe-White House, made a his> request. They reportec they! Were about ready to quit replied he had nothin mdreito; ask of them this year f H'E.' WEARY legislator left-behind a heavy load o busfness for their 1960 na (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1 ;WHERE TO FIND IT -The Air Force flier who ac cidentally shot down a je p i 1 o t e d by a. subordinal officer relates his weird e: perience. Story on Page D-2 Beach B-l Hal B-7. D-3 to 9. C-6, 7. D-3. B-6. Death B-2, B-3. Shipping Page O-3 C-l to 3. C-4. tides, TV, Dr10. B-7, B-l, 8. .Your A-2, WASHINGTON UP) So- viet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev began his his- toric .visit today with an ap- peal for "good neighborly" relations between Communist and capitalist states and a sharp reminder that the Soviet Union had beaten the United States in the race to the moon. President Eisenhower, wel- coming Khrushchev to Amer- ican soil, told the chubby Communist leader the United States could never launch an aggressive war because the American people rule the country and are devoted to peace. In the President's wel- coming speech was the clear implication that Russia has no such built-in restraints against aggression. While a curious but quiet- y unexcited crowd looked on at Andrews Air Force Base, the serious-faced Soviet lead- er heard the President ex- press the hopes of the United States for a "just, universal and enduring peace." THE TWO MEN. thus be gan in -the very first moments of their .exchange of visits a struggle for the, support ol world public opinion. Khrushchev's reference to his nation's success in put- ting a capsule on the moon, with the hammer and sickle emblem, was a frank boast of Soviet prowess in science. Almost in so many words he told the President that Amer- ican science would get to the moon sooner or later, too. It was a momentous scene n the gleaming sunlight of ie air base in nearby Mary- and. In a sense two worlds vere meeting for the first before had a naster of Soviet communism et foot on the United States. PRESIDENT EISENHOWER wears what seems to be a quizzical he's just squinting in the Soviet Premier JOINT EFFORT NEEDED Khrushchev chats with him on 'flight rnmp today. Between them is Wiley Buchanan, State Department protocol ency duty. Papers on the body of a an in the blast debris car- ed the name of Paul .Harold rgeron of Houston. THE INJURED included rs. R. E. Doty; the prin- pal. who was rushed to'a ospital for emergency urgery. The all-white schoo ad no integration troubles. "Some of the injured have icir legs and arms blown said Mrs. Cora Bryan dcRae, a former Houston Chronicle reporter who live earby. "They were horriblj mangled. It's too horrible tc escribe." Reporters said many pupli; were injured. Early report (Continued Page A-3, Col. 7) WHEN THE President's remarks were the Soviet pre- Ike Greets Visitor, Urges 'Just Peace1 WASHINGTON Eisenhower wel- comed Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev to the United States today with a call for joint Soviet-Ameri- can efforts to achieve "a just, universal and enduring velcoming ranslated, mier applauded. Then, smil- ng, he approached the micro >hone, donned his spectacles ind said there should be no obstacles to good relations >etween the two countries, said he had come to the Jnited States with "open icart and good intentions." In referring to the Soviet triumph over the weekend in planting a rocket on the moon, Khrushchev said: 'Our earth has become somewhat lighter while the moon has gained some hun dred pounds of weight." Polite applause greeted his remarks. Khrushchev huge turbo- prop plane, the world's big- gest airliner, touched down at Andrews Base at p.m. about 50 minutes late (Continued Page A-3, Col. 2) peace. "I trust that a full and frank exchange of views on many subjects may contribute to better understanding, on sides, of unresolved in- ternational Eisen- iiower said. Eisenhower's remarks were prepared for his greeting to the Soviet chief at Andrews Air Force a few min- utes after Khrushchev's ar- rival for a 13-day visit anc coast-to-coast tour. EISENHOWER'S TEXT: "Mr. Chairman, I welcome you, your family and party to the United States. I am cs pecially happy that Mrs Khrushchev and other mem bers of your family are ac companying you. On behal of the government and of the people of America, I express the hope -that you and the; PRESIDE1YT EISENHOWER sits betivrW the Soviet Premier and Mrs. Khrush- chev in open car just before leavfnd'bir base for the Wirephoto.) ill find your stay among us (cresting and useful. "I am looking forward to ic talks we will have to- cther. Although we shall not egotiating any issues affect- ig the interests of other ountries, I trust that, a full nd frank exchange of views' n many subjects may con- ributc to better understand- ng, on both sides, of unre- international prob- olved ems. "During your slay here you vill have an opportunity to ee something of our country, iur institutions, our customs and our people. You will have (Continued Page A-2, Col. 7) Cash Won by 11 More in Contest Eleven more readers have qualified to collect in The Press-Telegram Lucky Social Security Numbers contest. To become eligible print your name, address and Social Security number on a post- card and mail it to the Inde- pendent, Press-Telegram, 604 Pine Avc., Long Beach. If you qualify for one ol the cash prizes, you need only King your indentificatlon anc your Social Security card to the I, P-T. Here are the new numbers (deadline Thursday, Sept. 17 DOWNRIGHT COOL for Nikita S. Khrushchev. L A. Council Asks to Get U Pageant Transfer of the Miss Unl- rerse Beauty Pageant from .ong Beach to Los Angeles was asked by the Los Angeles City Council in a resolution unanimously adopted today. The resolution, sponsored by Councilman Ransom M. Callicott, urged that the Cat- alina Swimsuit Co. J9in with he City of Los Angeles ,in the presentation of.the inter- national beauty New Business relationships and ac- quisition new business was cited in the resolution for the transfer. Misgivings on the part of one city father who thought it "isn't nice of Los Angeles to ro1> a sister city or such an attraction" were quelled when Callicott told the councilman that (he City of Long Beach had "divorced" itself from thfc pageant. 4, 133-12-1648 562-44-1621 549-52-0148 570-44-4041 189-05-2369 550-10-6895 228-S2-9676 369-07-8255 395-18-1841 Here are Monday's winner (deadline Wednesday, Sep 16, 5 328-12-8927 342-01-8966 504-14-7374 553-50-7619 307-03-8041 547-58-2847 568-18-2541 557-16-6867 202-12-9592 091-18-4821. 550-24-8960 (S3) Restrained Throng Greets Soviet Boss WASHINGTON (AP) capital turned .out lousands today in a not downright cool By the lime the Soviet remicr and President Eisen- ower reached downtown Vashinglon In their motor- ade from Andrews Air Force ase the crowd was a big ne after a slow early build P. But there was an obvious bsencc of Iho enthusiasm iat has grccied some high- anking visitors such as Britain's Queen Elizabeth. For at a time there was 10 applause. Even hand clap ling was at a minimum anc much of that could have been or President Eisenhower rid ng beside his guest. It was as if the spectators lownlown somehow took cue from the President who was seen to smile only one during his formal airport ex change with his visitor. PERHAPS THE bigges concentration was on tlv sidewalks of the White Hous. block from 15th to 17th Sts on Pennsylvania Avc, Blai House, the government gues mansion where Khrushche will be staying, is just pas that point. Half an hour before th Soviet visitor arrived, Dcput Police Chief George R. Wai roflt estimated the number that block and'Lafayett Park, across the street from the White House, at A few blocks from ther (Continued Page A-2, Col, 4 Weather Low clouds 1 a le to- night and early Wednes- day, but.mostly clear aKd sunny. Little change in" temperature. Max imum temperature by noon: 74. Temperature 110. Below at South Pole AUCKLAND, New Zealan temperature'sank rtcord 110 degrees below ze: at the United States Sou Pole station on Sunday, sa a n'wsage received at Ame leaf; headquarters in Chris Mi' today. iiiild the men are lookln forivfrd to mail, fresh veg tables; and a relief crew. U. S. Rejects uss Plan on .aos Crisis WASHINGTON (UPl) A oviet proposal for solving ie Laos crisis was'rejccted the United Stales today Russian Premier Nikita hrushchev arrived here for old War talks. Shortly before Khrushchev cppcd out of his plane, the tate Department issued a latemcnt describing the So- iet proposal as "disruptive nd unnecessary." The Russian news agency ass reported Monday that ic Kremlin proposed a "con- erence to be called without elay by the countries which ttcnded the J954 Geneva inference on Indochina to onsider the Laos situation." The U.S. statement com- menting on this declared: 'Since the United Nations has Iready taken action on the .aos issue, the proposal for a second Geneva conference vould seem to be unneces- ary and disruptive. More- over, it would Ignore the au- .hority of the United States, The statement added that 'he "solution of his situation is not to be found in interna- tional conferences but in the cessation of intervention and subversion of th'e Kingdom of Labs." 2 Quakes Recorded, Probably in S. Pacific NEW YORK Mt Two fairly "sharp earthquaka shocks were recorded early today on Fordham University seismographs, a p p n i e n tly originating in the South Pa- cific area about miles distant.   

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