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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 12, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 12, 1959, Long Beach, California                             RUSS LAUNCH 2ND ROCKET AT MOON The Ftnett fivcnmg LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1959 20 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 8-1 Vol. LXXII No. 191 CLASSIFIED HE HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) A HUG FROM PASTERNAK Russian novelist Boris facing camera, embraces Leonard Bern- 1 stein, conductor of the New York Philharmonic, after making a suprise pub- I lie appearance at the orchestra's concert Friday night in Moscow. Mrs. Bern- stein is at right. Story on Radiophoto) Blaze Razes Acres; Man Missing HIGH IN LOW 30s SEEN CHILOQUIN, Ore. Flames ravaged new pon- derosa and lodgepole pine on the Klamath Indian reser vation today and bannered a column of smoke across a 200-mile stretch of Oregon sky. The blaze, once controlled Friday at acres, spread to acres of brush and timber under pressure from gusty winds up to 45 miles an hour. One fire fighter was missing and presumed burnec to death. Pilots said the. big smoke cloud trailed northwaYd'from the fire area, about 45 miles north of the California bor der, to the Columbia River which marks the northern perimeter of Oregon. Another out-of-control fire blackened 225 acres of prime Fremont National Forest tim ber Just east of the southern Oregon Indian Reservation, U. S. Forest Service dispatch er said. DRY LIGHTNING accom panied the gusty winds tha swept the big reservation blaze across fire lines tha once ringed it. The ligntnin cracked across the southern Oregon sky, setting numerou small fires, all either con trolled or in the mop-up stag  Maria alias and Aristotle-Onassis oday were cruising in the Adriatic time with iut her husband.and without lis wife. The 35-year-old Brooklyn iorn operatic soprano and the Greek millionaire ivho says he loves her "like a sister" boarded his big vhite yacht Christina Friday and set out for Greece. IT WAS a comparatively private cruise compared to he elaborate excursion six weeks ago when Sir Winston Churchill was aboard am diss Callas traveled with her Italian husband as the guests of Onassis and his pretty >londe wife Tina. Miss Callas is traveling this ime only with her dwar noodle, Toy. Onassis' 29-year-old wif  When lightning struck her elm tree, Mrs. C. A. Couch decided she needed light- ning rods. But she couldn't find any. She was unwise enough to mention the difficulty-to a reporter for the Nashville Tennessean. After his story appeared, she discovered that Nash ville has plenty of lightning-rod salesmen. So has Red Boiling Springs, Tenn., and Hopktnsvills, Ky. MEN WERE CALLING, knocking, measuring and estimating Friday. "It's been like this all Mrs. Couch said. "There are a couple of men here .now, and I don't .know where they came from." She hasn't made a purchase yet, Variable cloudiness will mtinue through Sunday, the irecaster said. BY 9 A.M. today the offi- al thermometer .had re- orded a high of 85. One death was attributed i Friday's high of 102 de- Estaviilo, 66, f 1117 E. :Hill St., died in a ong Beach hospital' after a hopping trip. A physician aid that the woman died of heart attack brought on by le heat. SEVERAL CASES of heat rostration were reported. San Diego saw the mercury oar to 102. Downtown Los Angeles sweltered in a steamy 00 degrees. It was 103 at ,os Angeles International airport. 'Avhigh of 106 was reported t four California points iVoodland Hills, Canoga Park, San Fernando and San Ga- iriel. peared to be a beer bottle. Officers recovered abou the same amount of gunpow der as would be found in shotgun shell. THE CONTAINER wa draped just inside an ope window of the church, 12 feet from the floor. It was at- tached to two strands of blasting wire, strung 30 feet around the corner of the building. Officers said the de- vice apparently was set off by touching the wires to a flash- WINNING BEAUTIES Miss Michigan, Ann Penelope Mnrston (left) of Wyandotte, and Miss Wisconsin, Mary Alice Fox of Sheboygan, pose happily after winning Friday night honors in talent and swiinsuit categories at Miss America pageant in Atlantic City. The new Miss America will be chosen Photo) Weather Variable cloudiness. Not so warm. Predicted high today: about 94. Mht. teenagers' could lave learned the trick in ligh school physics class. He doubted that any re- igious ill-will was a factor in the attempted bombing. The sheriff said members of the church heard juvenile voices outside the window just prior to the explosion. HOWEVER, the sheriff ad ded if the gunpowder had ex ploded, some of the congrega tion might have been injured They were grouped in a circle 30 feet from where the blast occurred. Officers believe the at tempted bombing was anoth er incident of violent van dalism. Last week, severa giant firecrackers or dynamite caps were touched off in this southwestern Idaho city. The church is just outside the city limits. Damage to the church wa minor, officials said. Truck Kills Mother, 3 Children in Car DAVIS, Calif. (DPI) A Santa Clara mother and er three children were killed near here early today when a truck, hit by another vehicle, went out of con- rol and crashed into the side of their station-wagon. Harassed Operator of Cafe Kills Kluxer MONTGOMERY, Ala. A young res aurant owner, warned three times by the Ku Klu; Klan to fire Negro waiters, killed a reputed Klansman early today with one blast from a shotgun, police said Detectives G. L. Arnette and E. L. Wright said James B. Peck Jr., 22, admitted shooting William C. Horton, about 38, in a rain-soaked parking Jot of a shopping cen- :er. Morton was a supervisor ror the Alabama Power Co. and the father of two babies. Sources said Horton was mown to be a Klansman. POLICE SAID Peek would ie. charged with murder' or manslaughter following inter- -ogation. The detectives quoted Peek as saying he shot iorton when the victim lulled a gun on him. The two men had argued earlier at Peek's place of bus- ness, known as Jimmy's Steak House, apparently over KKK stickers plastered on the front door of the cafe recently, officers said. Officers said a .22 caliber pistol was found in Morton's pocket. His body was found lying in the parking lot with part of his head blown by the shotgun blast Peek told the detectives someone who identified him. him "they would settle this f he would meet him at th suburban shopping center. Peek complained to polic earlier this week he had bee threatened three times by th KKK. self as Horton called him after the argument and told PEEK SAID he received etter threatening him be cause he fired three whit waitresses and employe Vegro waiters at his stea louse. He said the first threa was a slicker on the fron door of his cafe which sai The KKK is Watching You. Peek said on a third occa sion about 40 to 50 member of the Klan crowded In hi place, occupying all the table and stools and ordered co fee. He said they left withou saying a word. Peek said he dismissed th waitresses because they wer under 21 and thus could no work in any establishmen that served beer. He said the KKK also o dered him to take down h Confederate flags because h employed Negroes. He sa he refused. APS FOR SHANTYTOWN Burn Down Shacks at Tin Can Beach HUNTJNGTON BEACH Sheriff's deputies Friday >ut- the'torch to the remaining paperhoard "villas" at famous Tin Can Beach to make way for a public park. The shacks were ordered destroyed by the state along Ihe three-mile stretch of beach between Huntlngton Beach and Sunset Beach. The beach strip, officially carrying the Spanish name Bolsa Chicn, gained its less colorful name Tom the litter left behind by summer squatters. Sheriff's Capt. Herman Stahl said the deputies burned :he shanties, which were ordered vacated Thursday night. Vo longer will the squatters be allowed to set up their shacks along the beach and state rangers will patrol the area, which will be open to daytime bathers only. Adjournment of Congress Due Monday Senate in Battle Over Extension of Rights Commission WASHINGTON W) the Senate embroiled In a hot civil rights battle, House lead- ers today gave up hope for congressional adjournment to- night. They set their sights on Monday for ending the ses- sion. Speaker Sam Rnyburn (D- Tex) put over until Monday House action on a compro- mise bond-Interest bill and got the House to approve a resolution to adjourn at the close of Monday's business. Less than half of the mem-1 bers were on hand, but none objected to the The Senate would also have to the resolution for it to be effective. However, it Is customary not to offer such a resolution In 'either chamber until there is agreement be. tween leaders of both the Sen- ate and House. Shot Heralds Khrushchev's Visit to U. 1 Preparing Way Interplanetary Travel, Reds Say MOSCOW Soviet Union fired another rocket toward the moon today.and said it would help open the way to interplanetary (lights. This new rocket was launched into space at miles an hour on the weekend before Premier Nikita Khru- shchev makes his heralded visit to the United States. The announcement of the new launching made no men- tion of any passenger, pot even a dog such as previous Soviet rockets had carried. There had been suggestions in the West that the Russians might space launch a man into to coincide with THE HOUSE was in no po- sition to transact any con- Iroverslal business today be ca.use more than half of its members are not in town, Senate battle raged around a proposal to extern the life of the Civil Rights Cdmmlssion for two years. 1 was proposed as a rider to a catch-all ap proprialion bill, which carrie for foreign aid. This is the last major piece Dead were Mrs. Bonnie I.ec rouillel, 27, and her children, andy, 7; Terry, 4, and John, The accident occurred at a.m. near the Solano- County line on Alternate U. S. Hwy. 40. Hospitalized were the truck river, William Marion Mooneyham of Chowchilla, nd the driver of the other ar involved, Richard Earl lolman of Dixoh, Calif. HOLM AIM'S convertible, raveling in front of the outhbound Brouillct car, ;werved over the center line and smashed into the truck- ractor. The impact caused Mooney- lam's truck to go out of con- rol and plow into the left iide of the -station wagon Iriven by Mrs. Brouillet. Mooneyham suffered a broken wrist and Holman was hospitalized at Yolo General Hospital. AF 'Copter Crashes on Desert, 3 Killed LAS VEGAS Air Force helicopter crashed and burned on the desert, killing all three crewmen. The craft went down from undetermined cause 20 miles northwest of Las Vegas Fri day. It was based at nearby Nellis Air Force Base. Killed were 1st Lt. Ronald F. Riggs, 25, the pilot, son of Mr. a'nd Mrs. W. R. Riggs, Ada, Okla.; S. Sgt. Harland V. Mills, 22, son of Mr. and Mrs. Y. Z. Mills, Dallas, Tex.; and A.l.C. Terry A. Jones, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett L. Jones, Edwardsburg, Mich. Khrushchev's arrival in the United Slates. t THE UNITED STATES fired a rocket carrying a 13- pound satellite past the moon and into solar orbit last March 2. It sent back clear radio signals from more than miles out in space and then went dead four days 'atcr. Today's Soviet moon rocket was Russia's second attempt. On Jan. 2 the Russians an- nounced firing a satellite Into orbit around the sun. It passed close to the moon. Radio contact with this first Soviet moon shot was lost at miles.- Today's launching had great political significance here.. The announcement electri- led this nation, which Is pre- paring an enthusiastic send- off for Khrushchev, who flies to' the United States Tuesday for conversations with Presi- dent Elsenhower. V THE VARIOUS PARTS of the rocket were crnmed with scientific instruments de- signed, among other things, to make studies of the mag- netic fields of earth and of legislation.standing in the way of early adjournment of Congress. a THE SENATE met at unusually early hour, at 9 a.m., and for three hours dis- cussed various things before getting around to the foreign aid-civil rights Issue. Then they turned to recon- sideration of a bill passed earlier In the week to give President Elsenhower new au- thority to extend aid to na- tions behind the Iron Curtain if he feels it would help (Continued Page A-3, Col. 6) moon, peared WHERE TO FIND IT Parents are 'advised to be firm but helpful in laying down rules for grade-school 'lomework. Story on Page A-5. A-4, S. B-2 to 9. A-6. A-2. A-IO. B-2. Shipping B-2. A-7, 8, 9. A-2. Tides, TV, B-IO. Soviet scientists ap- confldont the shoot will be successful. The announcement, for which all Moscow Soviet (Continued Page Col. 2) Teacher Who Slapped Girl Tells Beating BUFFALO, N. Y. Rembes, fourth-grade teacher at Public School 48, said to- day she had been beaten 'by Mrs. Carmela Hargo after she admitted slapping the wom- an's 8-year-old daughter. The teacher said the wom- an came into her classroom with an unidentified man arid asked her if she had slapped tier daughter Rachel. "The moment I said 'yes' she started hitting Miss Rembes told police. slapped and punched and scratched me, screaming 'all the while." Miss Rembes said she had slapped the little girl "after repeatedly trying to get her to behave in class." ANESTHETIZED1 150 Draftees Take Pain Out of Army OESTERSUND, Sweden hundred fifty draftees who reported for one-month summer duty here Friday had tried to make the army as painless as possible. They were drunk. Officials said at least 100 of them will begin (heir army careers by facing charges of public drunken- ness, U. S. Soon to Launch Missile Headed for Moon With Payload CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. from Washington United States is ircparing to launch a lunar irobe of its own from this missile test center in the near future. Reports Nave placed the date as early In October, when the moon will be at its closest point to the miles. The shot will be an attempt to orbit a 375-pound payload about the moon. THE LAUNCHING vehicle will be an Atlas-Able TV, a four -stage rocket with an Atlas intercontinental range missile as the booster. Missile scientists here ex .pressed surprise that the Rus sians attempted a lunar shot his time. "There are only three or 'our days during the month when the moon Is in a very favorable position, that is, when a rocket has' the best chance of sending a pay load In the commented one. 'The. fact that they aunched the rocket at a time when the moon is in a least favorable position indicates the Russians are staging a propaganda show prior to Premier Khrushchev's visit to the United States." He noted the next best pe riod for shooting at the moon the 3-day period starting Oct. 2. The U.S. Luntr satellite wi' e a sphere with four paddle- vheel-shaped devices extend- ng from it. These checker- ward-size vanes are similar o those pioneered by the Ex- lorer VI "paddiewheel" atellite launched successfully iere last month. THE PADDLES contain so- ar cells to convert sunlight nto energy for-rccharging the satellite batteries. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration woes to orbit the moon and take pictures.of the so-called dark side, which has-never been seen. The satellite-Is de- signed to transmit back pic- tures by means facsimile system similar to a television camera.   

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