Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 10, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Press Telegram

Location: Long Beach, California

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 10, 1959, Long Beach, California                             CONGRESS OVERRIDES FIRST IKE VETO Arrest Woman in Fatal Ambush of Anaheim Man ffo Fitted LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, SEPT. Vol. PRICE 10 CfcNIS" TELEPHONE HE 5-1181 CLASSIFIED HE 2-M59 It. HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Works Bill Approved by Big Margin MRS. DELLA ROSOTO ULRICH sits in Orange Coun- 1 ty jail headquarters in Santa Ana Wednesday after arrest by Anaheim police as a suspect in the Feb. 7 shooting of a night club photo.) Lakewood Winner on Bonus List Laverne Warner, of 617.9 Ibbetson Ave., Lakewood, was ANAHEIM Police early today booked a diminutive Hawthorne woman for the Feb. 7 shotgun murder of Leslie Simpson, a. night club owner. Simpson's wife, Fern, Two Desert Gun Victims Still Mystery Tentative Identity of Slain Woman Now Discounted VICTORVILLE were fading today that iden- tifications had been estab- lished in the case of a young man and woman shot to death in a desert mystery. The growing disbelief of a mother that the woman vic- tim is her missing daughter and the results of an autopsy both tended to cast doubt on tentative identifications. Wednesday a Pasadena cou- ple, Mr. and Mrs. John Ewy, said they believed it was pos- sible the dead woman was their daughter, Mrs. Janet Hodges Whaleyj'riS, of Santa Maria. Sheriff Frank Bland offered the theory that the male victim might be her husband, Richard Whaley, 22. THE BODIES of the man and woman, both shot to death, were found Tuesday on the Mojave Desert near Ade- lanto. Decom position had ad- vanced to the point where identification has become dif- Train Hits School Bus, 7 Youngsters Killed ndia Border >isis Worse, tehru Says Reveals Bitter Note Exchange With China Chief NEW DELHI, India itter exchange of notes be ween India and Red Chin laid before Parliamen today and Prime Min Neliru said Premie En-lai's latest lelte vas lere sler hou adds to the gravity of th lorder crisis. "Step by step their policy las become mare suid. Each nation accused the other of aggression and each demanded withdraw that the its forces other from WRECKAGE OF A SCHOOL BUS hit by a train in Maryland today is removed by a tow truck. The bus, loaded with children, stalled on photo.) frontier areas whose owner- ship is in dispute. India of- fered one concession to make Ihe Longju area a temporary no man's land negotiation. one of the winners in first The bonus Press-Tele- gram Lucky Social Security Numbers Contest. Four other Long Beach area persons also qualified for bo- nus awards Wednesday, in ad- dition to the 11 regular awards ranging from to It is riot too late to mail a 29ryear-old postcard to The Independent, their home Press-Telegram listing your riame, address, and Social Se: curity number in order to qu'aiify for future' daily draw- ings. Today's winners (deadline Saturday, Sept. 12, 5 007-01-6059 495-09-7327 469-09-9661 438-18-9552 554-09-6828 570-20-2022 565-56-0500 518-20-2976 554-38-0542 546-52-0597 450-32-3847 And here are Wednesday's winners (deadline Friday, Sept. lost both hands in the am- bush. Officers checked out shotguns before they nabbed Mrs. Delia Rosoto Ulrich, 33, as purchaser of a .12-gauge shotgun at an Ingiewood store Jan. 31, It was the same weapon, police Capt. Thomas Taylor said, used to kill the 46-year- old1 Simpson as he and his ficult, even by checking of fingerprints. Probably the most telling iiece of evidence against the dentification of the woman as Mrs. Whaley. was the cor- oner's report that an autopsy showed the victim was not iregnant. Mrs. Ewy told po- ice her daughter is four months pregnant. ALSO MRS. EWY said she did not know her daughter to have any tattoo marks on her. The woman victim found on the desert had the word 'Skyhi" tattooed above her eft knee. Also .the coroner reported a discrepancy in ages. He said U.S. Supports Tibet's Plea for U.N. Help WASHINGTON UP) The United States today an- nounced its support of the Dalai Lama's move to bring the Tibetan question before wife' arrived shortly .after closed his night-club. the victims on were older than the the desert couple 652-16-9699 276-22-9213 461-32-2626 562-34-5425 545-56-7019 651-16-6726 527-32-6689 565-56-1779 547-54-5186 564-10-3426 399-22-4482 C APT. TAYLOR SAID the murder weapon was recov ered June 15 in a drainage ditch on Ball Rd. near the Santa Fe Railway tracks. Ballistics tests showed markings identical to the five empty shells found at Simp- son's home, 516 Haven Capt. Taylor said. He said Detectives John Kerr and George Laughter checked out every sale of a shotgun of the kind recovered from the drainage investigated fore they took Mrs. I into custody. They bookec tier on a formal charge of murder. described by the Pasadena parents. Dr. F. Rene Modglin, autopsy surgeon, estimated the age of the woman at 20 and the man about 30. Another hitch in the iden- tification was the fact that a grocer at Adelanto said he saw the man and woman in lis store Monday morning jut Mrs. Ewy said her daugh ler and her husband did not leave Los Angeles until Mon- day afternoon. The autopsy report showed the victims had been shot from the rear and that the the United Nations. The Tibetan spiritual eader, now is exile in India after having been driven out of his homeland by Red Chinese suppression, asked the United Nations formally Wednesday for "Immediate intervention." THE STATE Department said: MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK, Md. UP) A St. Louis-to- Baltimore passenger train rammed a stalled school bus at a grade crossing in moun- tainous western Maryland to- day, killing seven of the 26 children on the bus. Eight to 10 others were reported seri- ously hurt. The Baltimore and OhioV Diplomat, running about on time, struck the loaded bus at a.m. at a crossing marked by a flashing light and bell. The signals were operating at the time, the rail- road said. The bus driver, Leroy Campbell, 49, told authorities that after the bus stalled he opened the door and tried to get the children out. After a half-dozen or so scrambled out the door, the rest Jammed the doorway, blocking it. THEN THE engine hit the 3rd Housing Bill Sent Ike by Congress WASHINGTON W) Trie rlouse today sent to Presi- dent Eisenhower a third-try, million-dollar housing bill which carried advance admin- istration approval. The action came today on a loudly shouted voice vote. Two previous, and more costly, measures were vetoed by the President. The new bill passed 86-7 by the Senate Wednesday was pruned of some of the features found objectionable by the President in the first two vetoed But both sides renewed heir claims to t.onju, the solnled northeast frontier agency post w h i c h Red Chinese troops seized nearly :wo weeks ngo In n gunflght with Indian frontier The Chinese warned India against trying to rotp.ke it. ff THE SERIOUSNESS of the situation is high-lighted by Premier Chou's letter, made public in Pelping Wednesday, Sehru told the upper house pf Parliament. With bristling finality, Chou rejected Indian protests against what Nehru called aggression in the Long- President Suffers Initial Setback in 6 Years of Office WASHINGTON OP> Con- ress today overrode Presi- ent Eisenhower's veto of the econd-try public works ioney first 'time his has been done in his six eight months in Vhite House. Senate action put the bill over in the face of the Presi- dent's objections, since the House had voted 280-121 to override. That was 12 votes nore than the two-thirds margin required. In the Senate the count was 72-23, or 8 more than the two-thirds. The meas- ure, a perennial congressional favorite, contains construc- tion or planning funds for flood control, navigation ano" reclamation projects for every one of the 50 states. IT SOMETIMES is called the pork barrel bill but many legislators angrily denounce this label. They say the projects are essential to preserve the country's soil resources and to protect cities from flood damage, and to permit full use of the nation's harbors and waterways. The House never before ]u area. Tho Red Chinese leader, shootings had occurred less than 24 hours before the bodies were found. "The United States wel comes the initiative of the Dalai Lama in bringing the plight of the Tibetan people directly to the attention of the United Nations. "We believe the world should hear what he has to say, for the situation in Tibet has implications for free peoples everyvyhere." U. S. officials declined to say what step the United States might in procedures to get the ques- tion before the United Na- tions. IKE, NIXON, BANDS TOO LAVERNEWARNER She Won THE DETECTIVES said that Mrs. Ulrich was not the ambush slayer, but said that a clerk in the Ingiewood store identified her positively as the purchaser of the weapon. The detectives said California law makes no distinction be- tween the purchaser and the user of a weapon in a mur der. Arrest of the triggerman in the fatal ambush of Simpson, owner of the South Seas night spot at Santa Ana Free- way and Katella Rd., is ex- pected within days, police in- dicated. Kerr and Laughter said tfrs. Ulrich is the sister of foseph Rosoto, 45, acquitted :wo months ago in Orange County Superior Court for the robbery of Simpson at his cafe in March 1958. Her husband, Jack Ulrich, Is a former bartender at the cafe. Judge Claude Owens of Anaheim Municipal Court fused to admit Mrs. Ulrich to bail. Police1 said they would arraign her either this after noon or Friday morning. Red-Carpet Welcome Awaiting Biggest Red WASHINGTON 09V-Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush- chev, winging into Washington Tuesday, will be wel- comed by President Eisenhower, Vice President Richard M. Nixon, 10 bands and honor guards from all (he U. S. armed forces. The White House announced today some details of the planned red-carpet welcome, and also said that Khrush- chev's arrival time at Andrews Air Force Base will be a. m., E.D.T. A 125-foot-long red carpet, the same one used to wel- come other foreign dignitaries, will be laid at the airport for Russia's biggest Red to walk over. Some 400 Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine troops will be on hand as an artillery battery booms out a 21- gun salute within seconds after Khrushchev's big TUI14 turboprop jet touches down after what is expected to be a nonstop flight from Moscow. THE FAMED U. S. ARMY BAND will be at the air- and will play the Soviet national anthem and the Star Spangled Banner shortly after Khrushchev's arrival. Eight other bands will be stationed along the-15-mile route to the Blair House, where the visiting Soviet leader will. stay. All pf these will be military bands except for the Washington metropolitan police unit Eisenhower is expected to ride in his bubble-top limousine with Khrushchev from the airport along with Mrs. Khrushchev. bus broadside, knocking the vehicle down the track on its side 40 to 50 feet. Campbell, who owned the bus, has driven the same route for four years. He has a safe driving record with the county school system for iatton. more than 20 years. No one seemed to know what caused the bus to stall on the crossing. Campbell and all the in- jured were rushed to Garrett County Memorial Hospital at Oakland, four miles away, by every available ambulance, station wagon and car that could be summoned quickly. Oakland is about 40 miles west of Cumberland, and about 180 miles west of Bal- timore. Six of the seven dead were identified as Richard Hinkle, Nancy Deems, Lee Hoffman, Nancy Lee Harvey, Nancy's brother Merle Harvey, and Shirley Lee. One remained un- identified. a RAILROAD OFFICIALS at Cumberland said the engineer, Ott Droege of Cumberland, reported the (rain was going about 50 for that stretch of he saw the school bus start across the crossing ahead. Then the bus stalled, Droege reported. He threw the brakes on emergency stop, he said. measures. IT OMITTED 50 million dollars of loans for college classrooms, which Eisenhower criticized as the start of a new program of federal aid to education which he said had no place in housing legis- evcn while offering friendly negotiations to settle the bor- der disputes, accused the In- dians of aggression and de- manded a withdrawal of In dian troops he declared were trespassing on Chinese soil. "It sometimes seems as if China is acting like some 19th century nation in their pride and arrogance, ignoring the rest of the Nehru said. The Indian leader, who has based his foreign policy on non-alignment in East-West quarrels, appeared deeply dis- turbed by Chou's letter. REFERRING TO a Peiping Imd voted to pass a bill over an Eisenhower veto. The Sen- ate twice has done so, but in each instance the House backed the President. The first public works bill of the session carried 30 million over Ei- senhower's budget. IN HIS VETO of this meas- ure, Eisenhower centered his objections on 67 starts for new projects not included in his budget. He said these eventually would cost 800' million. The House on Sept. 2 up-, icld this veto by one vote. The new version of the the the legislation contains all 67 new starts, but cuts funds for all projects by 2V4 per cent. Its total Is under the budget. Eisenhow-. cr said it wos worse than the first bill because it had re- duced funds for work already under way. House Republicans did not hang together today as tight- ly as they did on the previous veto. It carried no termination date on authority for the Fed- eral Housing Administration to insure new home mortgage loans. The previous measure Imited the authority lo one .rear, which the admlnistra- :ion contended would involve lousing In election-year poli- tics next session. And it reduced the impact budget of 650 million dollars of slum elimination grants by extending the pro gram over two years instead of one, with 350 millions an thorized this year and millions next year. TODAY'S OTHER Congres (Continued Page A-6, Col. 8) charge that India inherited mperialistic policies from Britain, which freed the sub- continent in 1917, Nehru said 'there appears to be a failure n China to recognize the rev- olution in India." He addressed the upper louse after a special two-hour debate on the troubled slate of Indian-Chinese relations. In advance of the debate, (Continued Page A-6, Col. 2) ON TODAY'S roll call, 20 Republicans and 260 Demo- crats voted to override. Five (Continued Page A-6, Col. 6) Ike's Report on TV Tonight President Eisenhower re- ports (o the nation tonight on his recent (rip to Eu- rope and on the visit to United States next week by Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev. The President's speech xvlll be televised locally on Channels 2, 4 and 7 at p.m. Weather Increasing high cloud- iness but otherwise mostly clear through Friday. Chance of scat- tered thunders bowers to- night and Friday morn- Ing. Warmer tonight and Friday. WHERE TO FIND IT Nikita Khrushchev likes to go, go, go. See the third ar- ticle in a series on Page A-14. Beach B-l. Hal A-19. A-19. A-19. C-7 (o 13. B-10, II.' B-7. B-2. A-I8. B-3. Shipping C-7. C-l to 6. D-8. fl'des, TV, C-I4. Vllal C-7. A-19. B-4, Your A-2. UNDERLINED ON MAP is Longju, isolated frontier post that is claimed by both India and Red China.; "It was seized from Indian border.guards by Red Chinese almost two weeks Wirephoto.)   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication