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Press Telegram: Saturday, September 5, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 5, 1959, Long Beach, California                             OVER CRISIS IN LAOS The Souihlahd'i Fwe.fi-Seni LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1959 18 PAGES P RI C E 1 0 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 Vol. 185 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Liquor Store in Gun Battle Firestone- Park Merchant Wounds One of Assailants FIRESTONE PARK (CNS) A bandit's bullet today killed a gun-slinging liquor store owner who was robbed a dozen times in the past seven years Sidney Herman Groch, 35, lost his war against holdup men shortly after midnight when he grabbed for his re- volver in the crime-plagued store at S. Avalon Blvd. Groch was shot in the back of the head-by a tall bandit The liquor store owner firec simultaneously .at the gun man's partner, wounding bin critically in the abdomen'. GROCH THEN DIED on th a getaway car. Shortly after the shooting James W. White, 31-year-old ex-convict with a police rec ord for robbery, grand thef and vagrancy, and othc crimes, was left at the Gen eral Hospital ambulance en trance by his two accom plices. ...White, who .gave a ficti tious address, underwent sur gery and then was booked i the. prison ward of Genera .Hospital on suspicion of mur der and robbery. Sheriff's detectives were seeking his two accomplices. Groch had no fear of ban- dits. He had been robbed 12 'times, and his store was bur- glarized 14 times since 1952. On Feb. 28, 19S4, he was shot down in a gunfight with three holdup men in which at least 18 bullets were'fired. He suffered a neck wound and bullet crease in his head. 4 BECAUSE OF the frequent 'robberies, Groch wore a .38- caliber revolver in a hip hoi .ster. He was reaching for the pistol, when he was mortally wounded. A clerk, witnessed the slaying. He was in the stockroom! putting bottles in a refrigera- tor when the bandits entered the store. Cormier, who said the pair .was unaware he was there, described the killer as about 30. years old, 6 feet 2 inches tail and weighing about 210 pounds._ He had a bushy mus- tache and wore a red base- balf'cap and a long-sleeved blue jacket. The driver of the getaway car was between 25 and 30 .years old, 5 feet 9 inches tall and wore a gray suit. Cormier said in recent months Groch wounded two BUS CRASH INJURES ON JURNPIKt The driver and nine passengers were injured Friday night when this Grey- hound bus crashed into rear of a tractor-trailer'on Ohio Turnpike near Cleve- land.' Turnpike police said accident occurred in dense Wirepholo.) Collisions Kiirf wo ..Kills Men in Orange Co. Two .men were killed in traffic accidents to write the opening to Orange County's Labor Day weekend. High Early Holiday Death Toll By Aiiocifllcd Presi The'toll of deaths'in Labor Day weekend accidents rose rapidly today.' "The traffic toll is starting Alviri Cormier, out commented the National Safety Council. By 1 p.m. (local lime) traf fie accidents had already killed 97 persons. THE torists tp drive with care ari'd common sense. The council figured the great majority of the nation's 71 million motor vehicles will be rolling during" the three- day holiday period. The weather was dry and warm in most areas, a condi- tion that encourages speed. The council has-estimated that the traffic toll may reach 450 in the period that began Daniel Mathiason Mclvor, of 510 N. Olive St., Ana- cim, was killed at Fullerton nis. morning. Richard Eugene Sare, 32, of Corona, was killed on Pacific community late Friday night on Tuesday. Coast Hwy. at Tin Can Beach and their mother died this] men in holdup attempts, once and with a shotgun. at 6 p.m. will local time Friday end at midnigh Monday. Yellowstone Shaken by New Earthquake YELLOWSTONE NATION- AL. PARK, Wyo. mild earthquake shook the central portion of Yellowstone Na- tional Park today, but there were no reports of damage or injury. A stack of dishes was broken in a'cafeteria at Can- yon, a resort a few miles north .of Yellowstone Lake. Some Labor Day weekend vacationers were awakened by the tremor, preceded by two of .The quake was describer! by Joseph E. Primeau, general manager of .the cafeteria, as the strongest since the Aug 17 earthquakes. These tremors caused slides in Montana which left 28 per sons dead or missing and pre sumed dead in an area jus west of the park .boundary one -within the par! txwndary was seriously in jured in the earlier quakes bu the western entrance to th preserve was blocked for scv eral days. Ard Kincade, a park ranger said today's shocks were ap parentiy confined to the are of the Grand Canyon of Yel lowstone in the center of th park...... "It may have caused some rock Kincade said, The sharpest jolt was felt al 5 a.m. The'milder shocks cam'e -at about 2 a.m. and a.m. Mother, 5 Children TOWNSEND, Wis. five children of a vacationing Milwaukee family.were found dead in their cottage near this northeastern Wisconsin No Comment onU.N.Bid or Troops President Gets Regular Fill-in on Indo Situation TURNBERRY. Scotland President Eisenhower is oncerned about the situation Laos where Communists re threatening the pro-West- rn royal government. But the President refuses comment on whether the inited Nations should pro, ide troops to meet the Red ireai. White House Press Sccre ary James Hagerty told i ews conference today tha vacationing Eisenhower i elding regular reports on .aos. Hagerty declined to givi ny details on the nature o he reports to the Presideni le also refused to commen the U.N. request for mill ary support. ASKED WHETHER th U. S. National Security Coun cil might be called into a spe session to consider th situation in Laos, Hagerl; replied: "I have nothing more t ay." Laos accused nnighborin Communist North Viet Nam of helping the rebels and ap pealed to the United Nation to send shortest pos- sible lime an emergency force in order to slop the aggres-1 sion and prevent it from spreading." Eisenhower, who is taking a weekend rest in Scotland from hjs arduous diplomatic mission to Western Europe, 'is due to return to Washing- ton on Monday. GUARD AGAINST REDS (N LAOS Two armored-car gunners of Ihe loyal Lnos army mnn a SO-calibcr machine and rifle at a jungle oil I post ahoul 16 miles from the city of Vientiane near the Thailand frontier. Jungle warfare and guerrilla fighting was continu- ing today in northern Laos where Communist rebel forces, reported to be aided by North Viet Nam Reds, were exerting pressure on the loyal 'strong- hold of Sam Wirepholo.) Dag Rushing Home in Crisis Over Laos BUT THE President is en-I joying his golf in Scotland and may stay a day longer. "If Ihls good weather holds up I wouldn't be surprised if an extra day is tacked on the President's stay Hagerty told newsmen. In that case Eisenhower will take off for Washington BULLETIN WASHINGTON United Stales today an- nounced It favors United Nations consideration of Lnos' appeal for help'but did nor specify whether" it supports' sending (ronps In the cmbnttlcd Aslim kingdom. UNITED NATIONS General Dag Hammarskjold hurried home from South America to- rlday night. In. -each of the accidents morning. All apparently werej victims of gas poisoning were hurt serious- y. McIVOR'S CAR rammed a Santa Fe freight train stand- ng on the Raymond Ave. Tossing in Fullerton about :45 a.m. Officer Tom Bewley ;aid the automatic' signal was operating but that neither Mclvor nor passenger Gordon Michael Williams, 23, of 279 E. Center Anaheim, ap parentiy saw the warning. Williams suffered fractures of both arms, a broken leg >roken ribs and a head injury, -le'was taken to. St.1 Jude lospital, Fullerton. BOTH MclVOR and Wil iams recently were employed as teachers for Anaheim Ele- mentary School District. Me- vor was from Long View. Wash., Williams from Bil- ings, Mont. Sare was killed when his ight sports car flipped over and struck two parked cars on Pacific Coast Hwy. at p.m. With him was Geneva Seauchamp, 36, of 469 8th St., San Pedro. She was taken to Hoag Memorial Hospital Newport Beach, with arm am head injuries. Officers said Sare was at tempting to pass anothe when he lost con trol of his car. hich struck them omelime Thursday night. Mrs. Gloria Rovge, 32, the nother of the children who ad been slaying with them vhile her husband worked uring the week at his job in Milwaukee, died today at a lospital in Laona. The children were idcnti- ied as Kathy, 10; Chris, 7; Cindy, 5; Kenny, 3, and Caro- Ine, ..I.-, 9 4 THE BODIES were found at about 1! p.m.-Friday when vlrs. Kenneth Posse It of 'ownscnd, and a babysitter, (Continued Page A-3, Col. 8) WHERE TO FIND-IT A-4, 5. B-3 to 9. B-2. B-IO. Death A-2. Finjmcialr-Page A-2. Shipping A-3, A-6, 7. A-8. Tides, TV, B-IO. Storm Rips day to deal with Laos' nppeal for a U. N. lask force to stop any aggression from Communist North Viet Nam. Diplomats expected the nation Security Council to be called into an emergency ses-. sion Monday but predicted the Soviet Union would veto any U. N. intervention into.p Q the fighting in the Soiilhca'st KOFT1 I COK Asian kingdom. In the event of a Soviet II" W as 2 Planes Weather Fog and low clouds late tonight and early Sunday but mostly sunny Sunday. Little change in temperatures. Low to- night 63. Inhabitants CAPRI sudden storm of howling wind, rain and hail today plunged this Italian tourist island into darkness and caused panic and damage. The storm tore off hotel and villa canopies, and flooded streets. The Church of St. James was flooded with about two feet of water and windows of an adjoining school were smashed. Chil- dren in the building, many of them crying, were escorted to safety. for the motion picture 'The Bay of- in which Sofia Loren and Clark Gable have the lead roles, were demolished. Several persons wi slightly injured by flying debris. veto in the Council any seven members, of the Council can call an emergency session of ilhe 82-nalion Assembly with- in 24 hours. THE FEELING Is that the Assembly would approve help to the hard-pressed, Buddhist kingdom. Meanwhile, diplomats rep- resenting the anti-Communist Southeast Asia Treaty Organ- isation met in Washington Friday night. A statement is- sued afterward emphasized that Laos is "within the re gion of direct interest of HILLSBORO, Ore. light planes crashed into foot-high Chehnlcm Mountain SEATO." Laos is not a member of SEATO but the anti-Commu nist organization regards the Asian kingdom as under its protection. It was understood lhat there was no substantial dis cussion of intervention by SEATO while the l.aos appeal rests before the U. N. military (Continued Page A-3, Col. 4) Shot Kills Mystery Intruder KELSEYVILLE, Calif. rancher's wife shot and killed a man Friday, night who said raced his car to her ionic, battered his way in- side and ran toward her with- out uttering a word. Lake County sheriff's depu- lies quoted Mrs. Katherine S. 1'etlerson, 40, as saying she had "nei-er seen the man in my life." She used a deer rifle which wns kept in the living rocni. .1 t SHOT BETWEEN the eyes with a 30-cnliber deer rifle, the man was identified from papers in his pocket as Gene in low, swirling clouds in a'ccnroy Turner, 31, of Stock- 12-hour period, killing thrccjlon. Calif. Deputies said tha persons and injuring another. All the deaths came in the second crash shortly before 5 a.m. today. Sheriff's Deputy John Pylc said the pilot, Kenneth Towell, about 21, of Hillsboro, took off from Hillsboro aboul a.m., and did not have enough altitude as he headed south. Chchalcm Mountain rises abruptly from the Willamette Valley near Ncwbcrg, about 15 miles south of Hillsboro. Pylc said the plane hit a tree, cartwheeled and crashed. t PYLE IDENTIFIED the oth- er two persons in Towell's plane as Mr. and Mrs. Herman Tribur of Portland. Pyle said they were believed headed for. papers indicated he was a salesman. Neither Mrs. Pelterson, a prominent Lake County ma- tron and member of the Kel- scyvillu Elementary School Board, nor investigators could offer an explanation for Tinner's actions. Mrs. Pctterson said she and one of her three sons, Keith, 12, had just returned from the Ijike County Fair at Lake- port, about 100 miles north of jSan Francisco, wncn they noticed a car speeding up the lane leading to her home, set in a walnut and pear orchard a mile north of here. Her other two sons and (Continued Page A-3, Col. I) ,2 hours FROM SCAFFOLD earlier George Edward 'I SIMPLY HAD TO DO SOMETHING' Linda Kay, 10, Saves Baby Sister by Breathing Life Back Into Her Ben- son, 35, Roscbiirg. also took off from Hillsboro and head- ed south for Roscburg. He also crashed into the trees of Chehalem Mountain, but the rccs afforded some cushion- ng and. although cut and iruiscd. he managed to climb out of the wreckage and walk miles to Newberg for medical attention. ST. PAUL, Minn. "After all, Joyce is the only baby sister Ijve. got, I sim- ply had to do something." Linda Kay Gibson, 10, had only this simple ex- planation for the mouth-to- mouth respiration that po- lice and the family doctor credited with breathing.life back into the tiny body of, her 2-year-old sister. Joyce, ill with high fever; suddenly went limp and stopped breathing after a convulsion in the family's suburban Maplewood home Thursday .night, "Right away mother was frantic, on the telephone trying to get the doctor and the well, I just -HAD to-do some- Linda Kay said mat- ter-of-faclly Friday. What she did was to start forcing 'her own breath into the mouth. She kept on for about 5 or' 10 minutes. "Once In a while Joyce would sort of gasp a little and stop breathing T was half crying but I kept at said Linda Kay. When police and the doc- tor, did arrive, Joyce was breathing regularly again. 'They said I did good." Linda Kay happily re- ported. "I remembered reading in the newspaper, how one kid saved another kid's life by breathing in his she; c o n t i n u e d. "So I thought it might work with Joyce. "To- get ;more air I ?ran outsldt With her in my arms-and then stood In'her mouth. I shook her a little and called to it worked." Quebec Premier Stricken, in Coma SCHEFFERVILLE, Qu'e. fiery Premier Maurice Duplessis. lay in a coma today and partly para- lizcd. Ust riles of the Roman Catholic Church were admin istercd to the 60-year-old pro- vincial, premier. He was stricken with, four brain hem- orrhages while on to this remote Iron mining tQwn in northeastern Quebec which he took pride in helping to develop. Falls 5 Floors, Lands in Auto NEW YORK painter fell five stories from a scaffold Friday and landed in a moving car oc- cupied by two priests and a' woman. The painter. Jack Hub- ner, 25, of Bayonne, N. J., had been working on the Equitable BIdg. in the fi- nancial district. His condi- lion was described as criti- cal at a hospital. He came-through the rear window of the car. The driver of the car, the Rev. Daniel Sullivan, assist- ant'pastor of St.' Theresa's Church', Briarcliff Manor, N. Y., escaped injury. Minor were suffered by his passengers, the Rovi .tin> othy a .visitor from Australia, -Father O'S'ullivan's aunt, Mrs, Kate of the Bronx. y-   

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