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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: September 3, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - September 3, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Tiny LB. Mother of 7 Slugged, Left Penniless BLUEPRINT FOR GIVEN IKE TO NATO Unscheduled Visit Paid by President Refuse to Retreat From Principle, West Unit Advised The Soudifand't Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, SEPT. 3, 1959 Vol. No. 183 PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 nrv CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) BEATEN AND ROBBED of every cent she had, Mrs. Zeona Billings, 35, ponders her plight with one of seven children, Robert, 7, after being attacked as she returned from a neighborhood market Wednesday night. The 85-pound' wom- an lay unconscious on the sidewalk for 15 minutes before being found. Battle Laos Jungle Reds SAM NEUA, Laos A frail mother of seven children was beaten and robbed of every cent she had Wednesday night as she re- turned from a neighborhood market. Mrs. Zeona Billings, 35, of 3318 Santa Fe Ave., was am- bushed by a tall, muscular man as she passed Silverado Park shortly after dark. A motorist, Jim Farley, of 1794 W. Willard St., saw the army today threw a handful lying unconscious of paratroopers into the shaky defense perimeter around this rebel-threatened city and handed put guns to citizens. Brig. Gen.'Amkha Soukha- ving, defending this' royal army military headquarters for northern Laos, said Com munist units "are probing our lines only 18 miles away." The general said the main force of Laos rebels, support- ed by regulars from neighbor- ing communist North Viet Nam, is grouping in the Sen. Morse Starts Fight on Labor WASHINGTON Sen. mountainous jungles 27 miles north of Sam Neua. "They will attack within 10 amidst broken milk bottles and spilled groceries. Her ransacked purse, robbed of was found nearby. MRS. .BILLINGS, only 4 feet 9 inches tall and weigh- ing 85 pounds, was felled by a brutal blow to the base of the skull, probably by a blunt nstniment or fist. Police said the woman had 3een sprawled on the side- walk for about 15 minutes Before she was found. Mrs. Billings told police she had received her monthly W a yne Morse (D-Orc) launched a fight in the Senate today against the compromise labor regulation bill worked out by a Senate-House com- mittee. But indications were that By MARVIN ARROWSMITH PARIS UP> President Eisenhower today gave the West a blueprint foi peace Refuse to retreat one inch from principle and stay flexi- ble tactically. 'Then there will be no war. There will be the President told the North At- lantic Council in a surprise visit. The President sandwichec the quick visit to NATO head quarters into a tight schedule of talks with Western leader and French President Charle de Gaulle. ARISING FRESH and ap parently relaxed after a lat white-tie state dinner with D Gaulle, Eisenhower pitchec vigorously into the last da of his European tour. His appearance at the A laritic Council was designed to calm the fears of the smaller powers that his com- ing meetings with Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev spelled a lessening of their roles in NATO. is a matter determination "NATO spirit, of work as partners and to pro days at dieted. the he pre- the measure would get near unanimous approval when the Senate could get to a vote.: Morse made it clear he probably would speak at some length. He said he wanted to ;ive in detail his reasons for relieving that the conference report on the bill should not be adopted. Sen. John F. Kennedy chairman of the the h e'r 1 s IN VIENTIANE, the admin- istrative capital, Defense Sec- retary Phoumi Nosavan tolc reporters the attackers in- cluded at least-a battalion of North Viet Nam regulars. Red forces since Sunday have overrun lightly-manned tnere outposts. Advance units were reported within 12 to 18 miles of Sam Neua in what shaped up as a major offensive. "We intend to hold Sam Noua at all Phoumi declared. "To let it go would be a convincing argument to the world'that the Pathet Lao were re-established in their old domain." The rebels of the Pathet Lao movement, who want to set up a 'Communist regime in the little Indpchinese king- dom, took over the two north Loatian provinces of Phong in the afternoon mail and had walked to the market, three after her blocks from her home, washing and putting Navy allotment check Senate-House conference on the bill, was waiting to make his explanation of the com promise version. youngest children to bed. AT THE MARKET, spent for groceries. As she returned by the park, she said, a man jumped from the shadows and yelled: "Hey BUT MORSE took the floo first, saying he felt this coule sne be a time-saving procedure i that Kennedy in his presenta- tion could comment on Morse's objections. idea.ls all the' 68-year-old Wife Stabs Mate Dead in L. B. Hotel Accuses Victim and Witness of Killing Another A -17-ycnr-old domestic worker stubbed her husband to death with a paring knife Into Wednesday night in their room at (lie LeDon Hotel, 131 E. Anaheim St. A man who witnessed the slaying was held for inves- tigation of murder after the woman charged thnt he and licr husband had killed a 65- year-old man nt the hotel Sunday night. The wife, Lilly Ilelga Cald- well, readily admitted stab- bing her husband, Henry D. Caldwell, 5-1, at the height of a violent quarrel, according to Detective Inspector Harry P. Finch, in charge of the lomlcide detail. 'resident said. "If we are firm among our- elves, if we refuse to re- real one inch from principle, f we remain flexible so far as tactics are involved, if we give NATO the same patri- otic, deep devotion we give :o each of our own nations, (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) Mysterious Porch Bomb Kills Widow ANCHOR MAN IN RIOT Low man'in this triangle on a'Copenhagen, Denmark, street is n police otii- e'er whp tried football tactics during'a riot of, rock V rollers at inter-Scnndi- navian rock V roll concert Sunday. Girl friend'of the youth uses her pull to drag him away from tenacious leg-grasping-la'wmnn. .Riot, .which s la r ted when youths knocked out props from under a stage, causing it to collapse on spectators, ended with the arrest of some 22 rock V photoQ The Senate met hours Saly and Sam the last years Neua during of the' Indo- chinese war. Two years ago the rebel movement reached a truce with the royal gov- ernment and agreed to dis- The rebels resumed ac- band. tivity this summer, and the government charges they are being trained and supplied by (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) "All I saw was his face and everything went the woman told officers in the X-ray room at Seaside Hos- pital. Mrs. Billings said she and her husband are separated and that she had spent sev eral weeks searching in this area for a place to live. She said, she had found a two- story house earlier and was awaiting the allotment check .o pay the rent. Mrs. Billings said six of her children, the eldest 13, are enrolled in local schools and that she had planned to buy them school clothes and shoes out of the check. "I knew the rent was high but I thought if I could rent the upstairs we would have a nice place. It has such a big she said. "Now I'm not sure what I'm going to do." earlier than usual today and leaders had said they expec- ted the labor bill conference report to be one of the first orders of business. But two other matters were called up first and these, to- gether with speeches on nu- merous subjects, took up the first three hours of the ses- sion. SEATTLE mystery bomb blast killed a Seattle widow Wednesday night as she picked up a strange pape: sack left near her porch in a well-to-do neighborhood. Two women friends, who had just arrived on a visit were injured slightly. The widow, Mrs. Pear Kongsle, died moments afte the bomb exploded on th concrete sidewalk leading t the duplex where she hvec NO LEGACY All Those Names for 1 Pair of Pants CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI) Judge D. E. Henderson recalled 'today on his 80th .birthday anniversary that his.parents named him Jackson E z e k i e 1 David James Nathaniel Sylvester Demos- thenes Henderson in honor of "his uncles in the hopes least one of them would leave him something in the way of a' legacy. Henderson said all he got out of it was the name and a pair of pants from _one uncle. WHERE TO FIND IT Warsaw's ordeal in Nazi bombings is recalled in "The Day War Came" series, No. 3, on Page A-24. THE C 0 M P R OMISE bill worked out Wednesday after- noon writes into federal law for the first lime detailed con trols over internal operations of unions on such points as finances, elections, trustee- ships and rights of members. But it this is the part which caused the long and difficult beefs up the Taft-Hartley Law on such bitterly disputed points as secondary boycotts and organizational picketing. In the end, the conferees accepted the basic pattern of the broader Landrum-Griffin House bill on the Taft-Hartley (Continued Page A-5, Col. 4) Never Too Late for Numbers! Need a little extra spending money? It's easy and still not too late to enter The Press- Telegram's Lucky Numbers game. Just print your name, ad- dress and Social Security number on a post card and mail it to The Independent, Press-Tel eg ram, 604 Pine Ave., Long Beach 12. As an added attraction, five big bonus Lucky Numbers will be revealed to Press-Tele- gram readers Tuesday morn- ing in addition to the II chosen daily. Each bonus pick will be worth If you hold one of the win- Closing of Forests Ruled Out for Now SACRAMENTO (AP) Gov. Thrown says fire hazards aren't serious enough to justify closing Cali- fornia forests to hunters, fishermen and campers. He warned, however, after a Wednesday meeting, that if potential fire conditions get worse he will Immediately close the -10 million acres of land, Only public camp- grounds would be unaffected. U.S. forestry officials, who took part In the conference with state fish and game, na- tural resource and forestry officers, said they would fol- low suit on their 20 million SHE WAS booked lor In- vestigation of murder. The woman was arrested at bnr near the hotel in com- pany with Manuel, T. De La Cruz, 41, n resident of the hold who .ndrnjllcd ho was drinking with the Caldwells n their room at the lime of the slaying. Mrs. Caldwell claimed De l.n Cruz and her husband had smothered Leonard R. Heren- decn in his bed In the hotel aflcr "rolling" the elderly mnn. Herendecn was found dead in bed Momlny morning, his face buried in a pillow. At that time, his denlh was believed due to alcoholism. An autopsy is pending. ning numbers, bring idenlifi- One of her legs was blown atlon off. MINOR INJURIES were suffered by Mrs. Edith F. Friedman and Mrs. Alberta Bowman, who were bringing a pie to Mrs. Kongsle. They were standing on the front telling their the "strange porch after friend about sack" in the yard. Police said neighbors saw three boys running from the scene just before the blast about 9 p.m. An automobile sped away without lights and "clashing gears" moments later. Beach B-l, Hal A-21. A-21. Jo 12, A-22, 23. A-ll. Death B-2. A-20. B-3, Shipping A-18. C-l to 6. A-18. Tides, TV, B-8, Vital A-8, A-21. B-4, 5, 9, 7. 4 Smokers Fined Over Fire Lows VAN NUYS WV-Smoking in restricted mountain areas has cost four persons fines in Municipal Court. Mrs. Jack W. Whittman Jr., 1281.4 Riverside Dr., North Hollywood, was fined Tor throwing a lighted ciga- rette from her car as she drove along Sepuiveda Blvd near Mulholland Dr. Theodore Barzone, Barbara Stoke, and Lillian L. Land man were fined each for smoking in mountains. Typhoon Louise Heads to Taipei TAIPEI, Formosa Typhoon Louise struck For mosa's cast coast today am leaded toward Taipei wit] declining winds blunted by the island's nojth-soul" mountain range.' Before hitting the tslanc 144-mile-an-hour winds hai been reported. Winds up to 92 miles a hour lashed the coastal areas U. S. authorities qrdere Americans to p'rpcau tlons. "The school, with more, than pupils, was closed. and the Social I, P-T Security business ard lo fficc. Here are the new winners deadline Saturday, Sept. 5, 558-58-9583 559-10-2592 545-30-0545 566-18-9068 447-09-1910 468-22-4834 558-58-6326 565-56-3653 568-32-2487 520-01-3890 Previous day's lucky num bers (deadline Friday, Sept. 4 550-32-1507 552-40-4635 552-03-6042 510-09-8694 723-18-5195 418-24-8118 547-58-4158 (S5) 266-38-3841 557-16-4746 Big 4 Near Accord on Arms Cut LONDON Big Four tonight were reported near full agreement tin reviv- ing negotiations to halt the East-West arms race. Diplomats said an accord is merging from secret cx- hangcs in Moscow that will realc a new 10-power dis- rmament conference. It will onsisl of five .allied nations nd five Communist With headquarters in Ge- ieva, the Is expected acres. o get a -mandate from the Jnitcd Nations to begin a resh .search early In 1960 for ways to cut the arms and armies of the powers and lo >an nuclear weapons output. MOSCOW TALKS between Soviet Foreign Minister An- drei Gromyko and the U. S., British and French ambassa- dors are being accelerated to produce agreement before [he U. N. General Assembly BROWN, who had been asked by lumber industry rep rcsenlativcs to close the land for an indefinite period, said that although the situation is serious, fire danger ratings have improved slightly. Still, he said, temperatures are higher than normal and humidity and rainfall below normal, with no rain forecast for 30 days, Me added: "I will be In daily contact with forestry officials and if conditions return to the ex treme DE LA CRUZ admitted he and Caldwell went (o lleren- dccn's room, turned him over in bed nnd look 1 1 cents from his pockets. He denied they had smothered Herendecn. Later, Mrs. Caldwell told detectives she had taken 55 cents from Herendeen's pock- els while the man lay in bed. She said he was alive when she left the room. Mrs. Caldwell said she and her husband were married last April 4 and, since then, had had numerous fights and Cnldwcll had beaten her sev- eral times. He threatened her with a knife on several oc- casions and once said he would throw her out the win- dow, the woman said. meet in New York Sept. 15, informants said. The allied envoys have asked Gromyko to join in a Big Four request for a special meeting of the 82-nation U. N. Disarmament Commis- sion on Sept. 13, The'idea is ilo give the commission the chance to turn over (he nego- tiations to the 10-power con- ference. Nikita Inspects U. S. Show Again MOSCOW Wi Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev, prepar- ing for his U.S. visit, toured Ihc American exhibition to- ons rciuin iu uiu CA- danger that existed in lo review the p.cture of July and the first two-thirds of August, I may be. forced to proclaim a general closure." He called on Californians to continue exercising what he called the admirable cau- tion they have used in forest areas since they were alerted to the hazardous conditions. Weather Night and morning low clouds, but mostly sunny Friday afternoon. Little change In tem- perature. Noon temper- ature: 78. Home of Castro's American Aid Shot HAVANA (ffl Two gun men fired several shots (oday into the home of MaJ. William Morgan, the American who Gromyko's Is awaited. final response helped foil a revolutionary men. were the United States. Khrushchev showed great interest in the model of the U.S. paddle wheel satellite now in orbit around the earth. The paddle wheel was not on display when Khrushchev last visited the grounds July 24. Khrushchev asked many questions about the satellite and listened intently to the replies. Blast, Fire Injure 4 at Firestone Plant SOUTH GATE injured, one of Western powers named as participants In the Coming negotiations are the United Slates, Great Britain, France, Canada and Ita.ly.' The' Com- munist countries would be Russia, Poland, Czechoslo- vakia, Romania and Hungary. movement against Premier Fidel Castro. them critically, in a flash fire Wednesday at the Firestone Police'sala there were no Tire Rubber Co. plant's casualties. It was not dis- closed whether Morgan, from Toledo, Ohio, was at home at the time. Gunmen tried lo assassinate one of Morgan's aids recently. chemical mixing room. Plant officials said chemicals exploded and started a small fire, resulting in critical burns to Archie Copelnrid, 38.   

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