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Press Telegram: Monday, August 31, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 31, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Douglas to Build Cargo Jets in LB. Plant IKE. MACMILLAN FORM STRATEGY FOR K MEET SHOT TAUNTING HUSBAND Remorseful, Mrs. Maxine E. Kime considers events that led to her fatally shooting her husband, Bill, Sunday. The woman, who police say admitted the shooting, said he laughed when.she warned him not to leave the Photo.) Rich L B. Bride Kills Mate Who at ;While he laughed at-her threats, a weil-tordo wpma property owner shot and killed of-tw months Sunday night at their-honeymoon cottage; a 273% E. Market St. William M. Kimes, a 30- year-old unemployed oil field worker, was pronounced dead on arrival at Seaside Hospital from a bullet wound in the chest. His bride, 31, was and had purchased a clip o ullets for.it. Police, who said they wer ipt called to the scene fo almost an hour after th booked on suspicion of mur- der. Mrs. Kime told police she assembled and loaded a Japa- nese rifle while her husband shaved and showered prepar- ing to go out. :Then, when he ignored her threats to shoot him if he left the house, she fired the gun. The bullet passed through his upper arm, entered his chest and emerged from his back. POLICE SAID the woman, who owns extensive business and residential rental prop- erty in North Long Beach, ap parently panicked after .the shooting and ran from the house. She drove to her moth- er-in-law's home and told her of the shooting. The mother, Eva B. Killpat- rick of 5838 Jay Mills Ave., along with her husband, John, drove to the Market St. resi- dence and found their son un- conscious on the bed. They summoned police. .Detectives gave this, ver- sion of the slaying: Kime, a burly 276-pounc oil field worker had told his wife he was go ing her. She became angry and .warnet him that if he tried to leave she would shoot him. While he was in the bathroom showering, got the rifle o'lit" of a closet, the trigge housing from a bureau draw er and the shells from the kitchen. .She assembled am loaded the gun in the living room. When Kime went into the bedroom to dress, she sa down on a couch, facing him through the open door. o WHEN SHE WARNED him again not to leave, he shouted a profanity anc then laughed, 'Tell me more.' She pulled the trigger. The slightly-built Mrs. Kime told police that her husbam had- beaten: h e t -repeatedly during their two months o marriage. The rifle, a Worli War IT souvenir, she aaid sh received as a part ptymen on a rental and that her hus hooting, said Kime appai ntly died from loss of bkxx This was the second ma iage for Mrs. Kime; the thir or the dead man. SO Buried in Cave-in at Plant PAD PIRES, Portugal. (UP An earth cave-in at th construction site of Portugal irst big steel men today, First reports said at lea 3 men were killed. Severa others were believed st: mried under the debris, number of persons were i: ured. The men were excavatin ;round for the installation i >Iast furnaces.at the new m when the cave-in took plac lans Bared as DCS Wins Certification Airliner Receives FAA Approval at Ceremony in East By MALCOLM EPLEY Executive Editor FRIENDSHIP "AIRPORT, ALTIMORE-rponaW Doug- s announced here.tpday that cargo-carrying version of DCS is to be produced at Xjuglas' Long Beach jet This -development, 'adding ubstariiiajiy to the potential ongevity 'of the Long Beach >C8 operation, was disclosed t ceremonies here, marking He Federal Aviation Agency's ype certification of the DCS assenger.jetliher. This was the first firm an ouncemeht of Douglas plans or a jet cargo craft, a a "WE AT DOUGLAS are in o doubt about what our next giant step forward shoul said Douglas. "We nov  ination elementary and high school there with two other officers. He bluntly said he would arrest any Negro who ried to register. Trippett said any Negroes vho tried to enter a white school would violate a city ordinance banning integra- tion at public facilities, ihould two or more be in volved, they would be charged with conspiring to violate city law, he explained. Schools opened throughout Alabama without incident and segregated. C i f IN SOUTH CAROLINA, Vegroes made a bid to enter white schools in Clarendon County, whose board was one f the five cited as defend- nts in the integration decree anded down by the U.S iupreme Court May 17, 1954 Fifteen Negroes applied for eassignment to white schools vhich open Thursday. W Cantey Sprott, Clarendon oard chairman, said the ap ilications would be consid (Continued Page A-3, Col. 6) EXILED HIMSELF TO SAVE FACE Runs Quarter Mile With Bjtina. Snake OWASSO, Okla. 27-year-oid farm laborer ran a quarter of a mile Sun- day with a water moccasin biting into his leg. Jesse Crippen said the poisonous snake struck him while was fishing at a farm pond. Unable- to get it loose, he ran to the home relatives who pulled It off. "He was "reported in good condition at a Tulsa hos- pital. heers Greet in London Trip Leaders Resolve lo Bring De Gaulle Into Full Accord" LONDON Jiscnhower returned to Lon- don amid cheers today from weekend talks with Prime Minister Macmillan that irought broad agreement on he strategy of future Cold War negotiations with the Russians. Qualified informants out- iined results of the conference of the two leaders at Ike Radio Talk on Air Tonight NtW YORK The four major radio networks brrradcnst the Eisenhower- Micmillan talks today at p.m. In New York, ABC will cairy the program eight hours Inter.. 1 NBC and ABC hope lo re- ceive about a minute of the program by transatlantic cable film for television viewing sometime in the evening. CBS plans to fly to New York a half-hour -TV pro- on the talks, recorded ori video tape, for broad- cast at 9 a.m. (EST) Tues- day. curity Numbers Contest. In order lo enter the con- test, you need only print your name, address and Social Se curity number on a post cart and mail it to The Independ ent, Press-Telegram, 60' Pine Ave., Long Beach. If your name is drawn as a winner you must bring identificatioi and your Social Security can to the I, P-T. Here are the new winners (deadline Wednesday, Sept. 2 5 562-54-3067 525-12-0840 550-10-5097 337-01-2354 510-40-5003 345-05-5311 557-16-4338 437-20-4504 (S5) 545-40-6147 065-20-1108 557-03-4186 Weather Mostly clear through Tuesday except for some late night and early morning low clouds and fog. Continued warm. Chequers, the prime minis- er's country estate. They said Eisenhower and llacmillan displayed a re- solve to do all they can to >ring French President Charles de Gaulle back into 'ull cooperation with his AI- ies in the North Atlantic AI- iance. Eisenhower's coming ex- change of visits with Soviet 'remier Nikita S. Khrushchev ras said to have been the most important single topic covered 'in the American- British exchanges. DIPLOMATS SAID Eisen- hower and Macmillan decided (Continued Page A-3, .1) ANY GUM? Small Fry Remind Ike of War Days LONDON smajl girls with a sense of humor recalled lo President Eisen- hower today the small'fry's rally cry of World War As Eisenhower's motor- cade passed the King'l Cross railroad station, the girls held up a large placard saying: "Got Any Gum Ike grinned. 4 Years of Hiding in Church Like Death, Chinese Student Declares ANN ARBOR, Mich. (M was like death. I talked to myself more and Chheng Guan Lim said today describing his four-year voluntary, f a c c- saving' imprisonment i n the eaves of the First Methodist Church here. Chheng, flushed out of his hiding place Sunday by police, told incredulous authorities and University o f Michigan officials h e went into hiding after the Michigan-Navy football game in 1955 to save face after failing' in his studies in the university's e n g i- neeririg college. The 23-year-old Chinese student (laid -he hadn't spoken t o anyone during the four years. He said he subsisted on scraps of food picked up from the church kitchen following social activities. CHHENG, SON of a Singapore school said he brushed his teeth with burnt match sticks, cut his hair with a pair of shears and trimmed his beard with a set of tweet- ers. H i s strange existence was discovered after pri- vate police were hired to check.the church building after complaints of prowl- ers. Officers entered the building after a couple liv- ing in the basement heard noises. They heard a door slam and went to the eaves where Chheng was found. The student was found doubled up u n d e r a cat: walk wearing a pair of shorts. Beneath a paper tent were his blankets, earphone radio and a jar of instant coffee. Chheng said he decided on the'hiding place after the 'football game arid entered it to s t a y after throwing his clothes a ild identification papers into the: nearby Huron "Nobody- ever g o up (Continued Page A-3, Col. 3)   

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