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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 27, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 27, 1959, Long Beach, California                             IKE RENEWS PLEDGE TO PROTECT W. BERLIN SAG WET It was hot in Buffalo. Someone shot the temperature to 89 degrees. Swimmers flooded Lake Erie. I was working Ihe day watch, out of coolness control. My assignment: check the water temperature. It was cool, man. My name's Billy. I'm a tot. I was embarrassed. They got the drop on pholo.) 'K' Foresees Adjustment in Cold War MOSCOW Khrushchev Wt Nikita S. says his talks with President Eisenhower may mean the start of grad- ual adjustment ing differences of outstand- between the Communists and the West. But he says Russian opposi- tion to Western, ideas'on German reunification hasn't relaxed a bit. The Soviet premier in a new note to West German Chancellor. Konrad Adenauer said once more .that the great powers should leave the re- unification of Germany to negotiations between the East and West German gov- ernments. Khrushchev sent his letter to Adenauer nine days ago but it was published only Wednesday ly to time with Eisenhower's arrival in Bonn for talks with the West German chancellor. V "IT IS CLEAR to any real istically minded state that the policy of reunification by the efforts of others, and with the abolition of the socialist system in the (Communist) German Democratic Republic to boot, is Khrush- chev said. The West, on the other Redondo, N. Y. Make Bids for Miss U Pageant Two rtiore York arid RerJondb lave entered bids to.put on the Miss.Universe Pageant Catalina Swimsiiits said today. Catalina, owner of Miss Universe and IVfcs USA :itles, earlier had listed Detroit, St. Paul, San Francisco -lollywood, Pasadena and Ft. Lee as likely suites for a Miss Universe the announced divorce be- vveen Miss U and Long Beach becomes final. Oscar pagean director here, announced las vcek that Long Beach, woulc )ut on its owri internationa beauty pageant, and' drop thi itle of Miss Universe. Bu Meinhardt later said "w would-be happy to sit down and discuss our problem vith Catalina." Commented Meinhardt to day: "We haven't heard from Catalina yet. I think they ar stalling and may be negotiat ng with another city." Commented John E. Watt Jr., Catalina president: "Wi laven't heard from anyone in an official capacity who ca speak for. the Long Beac hand, contends that reunifi- cation must beVworked .out by the Big F.riu'r who-led the fight'agaihs.t' Hjtler Germany arid-.who divided Germany after "trie. war. The We'stern Allies also refuse to recog- nize the East Gerinan regime oh an equal .basis with the West German government. Khrushchev wrote .the West German chancellor that his own talks with Eisenhow- er could: result in "mutually acceptable decisions." "IT he contin- ued, "that we are on.the eve of an historic turn in the pol- icy of the two further isolation to gradual rapprochement and adjust- ment of the outstanding is- sues to ensure the peacefu coexistence of all stales." But the Soviet premier said Adenauer must recognize there are two German state; capitalist West and Communist East. Khrushchev declared that Adenauer's refusal to dea With the East Germans "leads one to think that you do no want the reunification o: Germany, but merely look for arguments to continue the disputes-and thereby pro long' the state of the Cold War." THai King qnd Queen to Pay Visit to U. S. "..WASHINGTON Wi King and Queen of Thailand have accepted an invitation from President Eisenhower to visit the United States next 'year. White House" an nounced today that their majesties will.be here for. official visit begin ning late in June, -ondon Gives -heers After Visit to Bonn Adenauer Talks Hours With President LONDON W President Eisenhower reached London onight to continue his talks vith leaders of the Western alliance. He flew in from Bonn, where he met hours with Chancellor Konrad Ade- lauer. There he renewed his pledge to protect the people of West Berlin and to stand ast with America's Western allies against any menace from Soviet Communism. Eisenhower's orange-nosed let flew him to London from West Germany in an hour and 25 minutes. Big Quake Kills 10-40 in Mexico MEXICO CITY ern Mexico today counted at east 10 dead following the nation's worst earthquake of he year. Communications were still out to many points, and some estimates of the toll went as high as 40 dead. The quake hit about a.m., Wednesday, spreading destruction and panic across he six tropical states of Vera- cruz, Oaxaca, Campeche, Yu- catan, Puebla and Tabasco. The heaviest shocks appar- ently were felt on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, narrowest between the ifllf of Mexico and the Pacific. V SUBTERRANEAN rumbles accompanying the earth shocks added to the panic. said the number of injured may reach 130, or lore... Jaltipan, a small town 25 miles from the gulf coast in southern Veracruz state, ap- parently was hardest hit. An official report said seven were killed there. But Pemex, the government oil monopoly, said its Jaltipan office re ported 20 dead, 130 injured and between 60 and 80 per cent of the down's buildings damaged. Acayucan reported two deaths and 40 injuries. An official report said there was another death at Chinameca (Continued Page A-6, Col. 5) WHERE TO FIND IT Mystery shrouds death of woman on desert highway miles from civilization. Story on Page A-2. Beach B-l. Hal A-21. A-21. C-5 to 11. B-fi, 7. A-11. A-20. B-3. Shipping A-18. C-l, 2, 3, 4. A-18. TV, Vital Statistics-Page C-5. A-21. B-4, 5. Your A-2. group. CATALINA DENIED it hai scheduled an internal confer ence of top executives toda .p make decisions on its Mis Universe plans. The confer ence had been reported press dispatches. Dennis Gless, public re ations chief for. Catalina issued this statement: "W expect to discuss the situa tion next weqk. All we ca say definitely is' that ther will 'be a Miss Univers Pageant next year." Catalina in all previou press releases had stated hoped could Beach. It did not mentio that hope in today's pres statement. next year's pagean be put on in Lon SouihfaniTt Fittett Evening Newtpapcr LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 1959 Vol. No. 177 PRICK 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-1 161 PAGES CLASS IKIED HE a- 60 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) ON HAND to greet him were Prime Minister Harold Vlacmillan, Foreign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd and the biggest news, and tele- vision corps ever seen at London Airport. Queen Eliz abeth 11 was represented by Lord Gosford, one of her ords-in-waiting. Police estimated the wel coming crowd at Eisenhower is the first U.S. President to make an official visit to Britain since Wood row Wilson came here in De comber .1918. Harry S. Tru' man made a'brief stopover in STANDING OVATION 1945 at the time of the Pots- dam Conference. MACMILLAN TOLD Eisen- hower: "It is my privilege to wel- come you to Britith soil on behalf of all the people of ithe United Kingdom without any distinction of party of of creed. "You are a President whose name was a household word to all of us before your elec- tion to high office. "We have equal confidence that as leader of a great sister democracy you will carry through your task with the same courage and same suc- cess as when you were the general leading the Allied forces in World War II." t EISENHOWER replied: "I appreciate most deeply your kind words as to the task that falls to the lot of ourselves. "I must say my deepest re- action and sentiment at this moment is that of extraordi nary pleasure, true enjoy- ment to be back here again in this land T have learned so much to love. "Here are some of my warmest and best friends. "I did not have to come here to assure you or '-the British people that the Amef; ican people stand with them strongly, firmly and deter- minedly in defense of free- dom and the dignity of man. "It is good that we can have the opportunity to view (Continued Page A-4, Col. 3) BUT CUSTODY RULING STAYS 'No! I Want Girl Screams in Court LOS ANGELES 9-year-old girl from a broken home threw a courtroom into confusion Wednesday when she screamed defiance at a judge's order she must return to her mother's custody. "No, ho, she shouted. "I won't go'. I want'my daddy. I want my daddy." Little Karen Roath nevertheless was taken from her father, George C. H. Roath, because the court order ac- companying a divorce decree, gave him custody for only 45 days during the summer. The time expired Aug. 1. KAREN'S MOTHER, Mrs. Vera Jo'Tatum, had asked for the child's return. The father court his daughter was terribly upset at having to leave him. "When you people'get a divorce like the judge reminded him, "that's a cross you have to bear." Karen had to be dragged, screaming from the court, by a deputy and Mrs. Tatum, but later she quieted when she was assured that she would get to see her father at intervals. Tearfully, she kissed him goodby. President Eisenhower and West Germany Chancellor Konrad Adenauer ..stand in back-.of specially built Mercedes as Uiey ride' through city of Trois- kdorf near Bonn. The President requested that he be-conveyed in car in which ''he could stand to acknowledge greetings. (Additional picture on Page A-3.) CheckList of Lucky Numbers Check today's list of Lucky Social Security Numbers care- fully. Yours may be you have qualified for a share' of the Lucky Dollars. To qualify, print your So- cial Security number, name and address on a postcard and .mail it to: Social Security Numbers.'lndependent, Press- Telegram, 604 Pine Ave., IT'S ROBES OR ELSE, NOW Judges Blue in Face Over New Black Law LOS ANGELES next month, it wil be against the law for a California judge to hear suit in a suit. Whether he likes it or not, he must try black rogue in black robes. Long Beach 12. If your number is drawn, bring your Social Security card and identification to the I, P.-T. Here are the new winners (deadline Saturday, August 29, 4 502-10-5516 449-36-7283 515-09-7854 551-14-2687 519-30-8939 160-16-3489 (55) 464-07-0215 561-14-0644 Here are numbers an nounced Wednesday (deadline Friday, Augi 28, 5 564-36-6478 565-32-8998 549-09-6431 545-10-9913 555-12-2542 '572-18-3034 720-03-0146 566-32-4405 350-07-9745 572-46-3435 554-16-2849 In fact, this costume will be required for all trials, be- cause a new state law says: 'Every judge of a court of record shall in open court during presentation'of causes before him wear a judicial robe which he shall furnish at his own expense." Some judges have been wearing robes on their own, but others think very little of such fancy get-up. Superior Judge LeR.oy Dawson, for example, calls the law "the most stupid piece of legislation I have ever heard of." 'I am waiting with bated Plane Forced Down With 111 Passengers PHOENIX Ameri can Airlines 707 jet, carrying 111 passengers including FBI Chief J. Edgar Hoover, made an emergency landing at Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix today. Airlines officials said a minor electrical malfunction caused'the cockpit to become overheated and triggered a fire-warning light. The giant plane.'en'route'from Los An- geles to Washington, landed sately. Officials said was no sign df fire. there AF 'Copter Crash Kills 7 in Arctic WASHINGTON W) ingston Lord Satterthwaite, a senior U. S. Foreign Service officer, was among seven per- sons killed Wednesday in a helicopter crash near Thule Air Base, Greenland. Satterthwaite, 50, was deputy chief of mission at the U. S. Embassy in Copen tiagen and was in Greenland the on official business at time of the-accident. Six of those who died in the accident were Americans, and a Dane. Other killed: were Capt. James H. Ozier, Albuquerque, N. M.; Capt. Dale W. Robert- son, Kenneth R. Kenerick, com mander of the Army 7th -Ar- tillery Group at Thule; Col. air attache, American Embassy, Copeh hagen, a native of Ashland, Wis.; and Maj, Frank W. Chandler, C., he said, "to see wha kind of uniform the Icgis lators order for themselves. "ANOTHER EFFORT augment the principles conformity that have bee evident during the past 2 years in this grum bled Superior Judge Josep L. Call. Judge Call said he will con form. But he pointed to th State Constitution, whic says judges must swear t support and defend the stat and federal "and no other oath, declara tion or test shall be re quired...." Robe wearing, Call be ieves, is an unconstitutiona 'test" under this provision. Superior Judge Arthu Crum, who has never owne a robe during his 28 years o the bench, commented: "I don't think you ca make a judge out of a ma simply by making him clothes rack." i ANOTHER Superior Judgi Frank G. Swain, put his com plaint in poetry: "Some judges do not wish to wear a robe in earthly courts. "Of such apostacy, take blackens their re- ports. "The Judgment Day wil weigh their worth by "Those who refuse a robe on earth will get no robe in heaven." Weather Night and morning tow clouds but mostly sunny Friday afternoon Little change in tem- perature. ire Polaris: rom Navy hip at Sea I st Such Launching' of Sub Missile Highly Successful CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA. Navy for the Hrsl me today fired a lest ver- ion of a Poluris submarine lissile from a ship a! sea. An informed source re- shortly after the lunching that the shot was ighly successful. The spectacular launching ppeared perfect as com- iressed air shot the Polaris rom a tube burrowed into he deck of the USS Obser- ation Island. The first stage some 70 feet above he deck. v 4 o A 28-FOOT missile arched igh in the sky and headed own the Atlantic missile angc, spurting a long trail ot white smok.e. A break in the moke trail and a puff of-fire iO seconds later indicated lurnout of the first stage and gnition of the second. The Observation Island vas cruising slowly in calm vatcrs about seven miles 'off shore at the time of the aunching. Newsmen saw the smoke trail clearly from the jeach but the missile was a iery pinpoint in the sky. The ship launching wag another step in developing he Polaris as a deadly weapon for ocean-prowling submarines. ATTENTION has been fo- cused on the Polaris program since Admiral Arleigh Burke, J.S. chief of naval opera- tions, announced last week that Russia probably has iubmarines capable of firing jallistic missiles. The Soviet missiles, laun- ched from conventional sub- marines, probably have ranges of less than 200 miles. When operational, the 'olaris will have an initial capacity of miles .but t will be at least a year be- :ore it is ready for combat use. Labor Bill's Fate Near Its Climax WASHINGTON W The abor bill conferees failed to agree on a. bill at their morn- ng session today but ind> cated they might have come closer to settlement of one y point. Sen. John F. Kennedy (D- the conference chair- man, told newsmen he be- ieved the afternoon session should determine whether there will be a deadlock or not. The conferees' job is to differences betweeri Senate and House versions of the legislation. Senate Democrats arranged to meet an hour in advance of Ihe afternoon conference 16 try to draft some new guage to meet House objec- tions to compromise posals they offered earlier in the week. a THE HEAD of the House conferees said he did not sei how his side could make any; more concessions. "I believe we have made the proposals and counter- proposals the House would expect us Chairman Ora- ham A. Harden (D-NC) of th< House.Labor Committee tokf newsmen.   

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