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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 25, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 25, 1959, Long Beach, California                             IKE TO GREET NIKITA PERSONALLY r BOMBS WAY It's actually part of an aerial tow target that Sher- man Brewe is examining, but it bombed his Coro- nado home today. The target fell from a Navy plane. Four persons inside the house were unin- Wirephoto.) 1-Cent Gas Tax Increase Voted by House Group WASHINGTON (AP) The House Ways and Means Committee today voted down a compromise proposal to solve the highway financing crisis. Taking a slap at Speaker Sam Rayburn the commit- tee by a 16-9 vote, reaffirmed its previous action for a 22-month l-cent-'a-gallon increase in the federal Time to Get in the Game gasoline tax. It turned down by a vote of 13-12 Rayburn's compro- mise which would limit the penny increase in the gas tax Red Carpet Treatment to Be the Rule President Solves Ticklish Question of U. S. Protocol WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower said today le intends to meet Nikita S. at the airport when the Soviet Premier ar-! rives here Sept. 15. This resolved the protocol question of whether Khru- shchev will be received as chief of state or as head of the Soviet government. If he were to be received as head of government, under strict protocol he would be welcomed by Vice President Richard M. Nixon. Eisenhower lold a news conference that as chairman of the Soviet Council of Min- sters, Khrushchev in effect s head of state. There had been some indi- cations previously that some- thing a little short of the full No. 1 ceremony might be set up for Khrushchev. THE DECISION, however, was up to Eisenhower. On a related subject, Eisen- hower said one purpose of his trip to Europe is to pledge Western unity "in opposing, by force if necessary, any ag- gression" against the allies. The President also told thej news conference that on his trip, starting Wednesday, he wants to pledge once again "America's.devotion to peace with honor and justice." Eisenhower met with news-! men about 14 hours in ad- vance of his scheduled de- parture for conferences with eaders of West Germany, Jrilain and France. His talks with them will be a prelude to his discus- sions with Soviet Premier Vikita Khrushchev in Wash- ngton starting Sept. 15, and :o his own planned visit to the Soviet Union later in the fall. The Southland't Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, AUGUST 25, 1959 Vol. 175 PRICE 10 CENTS 30 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE HOME EDITION [Six Editions Daily] Slain Coed Knew Nikita 'Can't Assailant, Police Bluff Theorize in L A.Says Nixon to one year months. The committee instead of 22 action di- More winning numbers in (he Press-Telegram's Lucky Social Security Numbers Con- test are announced today. To be eligible for the con- test, print your Social Securi- ty number, name and address on a postcard and mail it to: Social Security Numbers, In- dependent, Press-Telegram, 604 Pine Ave., Long Beach 12. If .your number is drawn, bring your Social Security card and identification to the Here are the new numbers (deadline Thursday, Aug. 27, PARENTS OF SLAIN COED Masking their bereavement, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Martin leave their North Hollywood home Mon- day after learning their daughter, Linda Edna Martin, 21, USC coed, was knifed to reeled chairman Wilbur D. Mills (D-Ark) to take legisla- tion to the House independ- ently of the House Public Works Committee, which Monday agreed to go along with the Rayburn com- promise although a majority of committee Democrats op- posed any gas tax increase. BY PASSAGE of the Ways and Means Committee rev- enue raising proposal, con- traction on the nterstate system would be atjle to continue next year at l rate of and n fiscal 1962 at a rate of ON THE TRIP to Europe, Eisenhower will meet first in Bonn with West Germany's Chancellor Konrad Adenauer; in Britain with Prime Min- ister Harold Macmillan, anc in France wilh President Charles de Gaulle. At. the outset of today's session with reporters, Eisen- lower announced he wanted to read a statement. 5 549-09-4610 360-07-7603 463-14-2712 549-40-3413 425-40-2250 347-26-4248 549-10-2821 571-34-8211 132-14-2921 338-30-4625 547-18-9923 Here are numbers previ- ously announced (deadline Wednesday, Aug. 26, 5 p.m..) 569-26-9497 266-01-8989 549-40-8415 547-58-1277 564-10-4282 445-16-4476 548-38-0828 552-34-7911 548-56-8082 443-26-0299 433-40-3532 This is only slightly under presently authorized appor- :ionments in the 1956 author- zing law of for each of the two years. I Reading from it, he then! said his trip to Europe has several purposes, and added that one is: 'To pledge, once again, in the several capitals I shall visit, America's devotion to peace with honor and jus tice." Next in clear words of cau (Continued Page A-2, Col. 3) Weather Night and morning low clouds but mostly sunny Wednesday after- noon. Littie change in temperature. 15 Hurt When Train Jumps Rails in Ohio TOLEDO, Ohio persons were injured Monday when seven cars of a nine- car Baltimore Ohio pas- FBI Arrests Motherwell for Slaying ATLANTA Lord Motherwell, accused of kill- ing a Washington, D. C., widow out for a last spree with a big bundle of cash, said today he didn't know the woman was dead. Motherwell went to jail un- der bond after a pre- .iminary hearing before a U. S. commissioner was post poned. Attorneys in Wash- ington, engaged by Mother- well's wife, telephoned dur- ing the hearing and requested a delay. The 43-year-old handyman nattily attired in a dark bus! ness suit, was arrested by FBI agents today as he was about to board a plane for Cleveland. "IT CAME as quite a sur prise to me to be Motherwell told reporters after the session before Com LOS ANGELES A brunette coed steps nude from Legion Assured Support of Free World to Be Firm MINNEAPOLIS Vice President Richard M. .Nixon told the American Lcyion to day that President Eisenhow- er will not be "taken in or bluffed" by Nikita Khru- shchev during the Soviet pre- mier's visit to the United States next month. 'I.can assure that the fears of those who believe that President Eisenhower may be taken, in or bluffed by Mr. Khrushchev are completely without he said. "There is no doubt what- ever that the interests of the United States and the free jworld will be vigorously, firm- ly and aggressively represent- ed by the President in this meeting." The Vice President also promised there will be no negotiations of the problems of American allies during the meetings. "WE REJECT the concept that two great U. S. and the decide the fate of other peo pies without consultation with he said. "There are some who fear a bath at her fiance's apart- ment and confronts an in- I l ARMLESS MOrHER CUDDLES INFANT Cradling her four-day-old son with an educated foot, Mrs. Joann McCarty Talbert, 18, happily looks down on her first-born, Resden Sherman Talbert Jr., just before leaving Columbus, Ohio, hospital. Without arms since her birth, Mrs. Tal- bert has learned to write, thread needles, comb her now cuddle her feet. truder who will slash her to death with a knife in the next few minutes. Without bothering to cover lerself with a towel from the >athroom, Linda Martin, 21, and the intruder argue for five minutes in voices loud enough or a neighbor to hear. "You get out of Miss Martin finally shrieks. A mo- ment later, as the killer strikes, she cries: "Help me, help me." Slashed several times once near the Martin stumbles down a flight of stairs to a side door. Her flailing fists break the door's ;lass pane in a frantic efforl to get away. Then, her life alood ebbing, she crumples and dies. THAT'S HOW homicide detectives today reconstruct ed the Sunday night slaying of the talented graduate mu sic student who planned to marry an art student in a few months. Police said the fact tha she didn't bother to covei herself and argued with the senger train derailed in Frank A. Holden None last January when urban Perrysburg. hurt seriously. i The diner, last car on the train, was tilted at a 45-de- was questioned I had been o; the opinion that she was stil alive." that the American people will be lulled into a false sense of security and trust by this exchange. "1 think that those who be- ieve this to be the case un- derestimate the intelligence of both our people and our eaders. "When President Eisen- hower meets Mr. Khrushchev you can be sure he will have in mind the record of broken major treaties and agree- ments by the Soviet govern- BLASTS RACKET ELEMENT out of 52 since Ban on Pro Boxing Weighed by Brown SACRAMENTO (AP) Gov. Edmund G. Brown said today he might recommend the abolition of pro- fessional boxing in California in 1961 unless Congrerss passes some laws before that time. 1933. "IT WOULD BE naive and wishful thinking to assume that the visit of Mr. Khrush chev to the United States will result in any basic change in the Communist objective of world domination or their ad- herence to policies designed to achieve that goal. "While under standing alone will not bring peace, misunderstanding could pro- voke war. "Khrushchev will see and hear some things which will change his preconceived no- tions about the United States and which in tuin will give him pause before he embarks gree angle and rescue workers Motherwcll is accused broke open the car to let Pearl Ida Putney, [occupants out. Find Plane, Victims of Crash 8 Yrs. Ago Wife Run Over, Killed; Mafe Held ONTARIO aircraft worker pushed his wife from an auto during an argument and then drove back and forth over her crumpled body, police report. Mrs. Barbara Heisel, 24, mother of four, was desd on arrival at a hospital Monday. Robert Heisel, 25, booked on suspicion of murder, (old officers ihe argument began when he accused hte wife of infidelity. 72-year-old wealthy widow of Albert H. Putney, one-time State Department official and university professor. Her skeleton was found Aug. 16 in a lonely wooded (Continued Page A-2, Col. 5) man so long indicated she on a course of action in the may have known him. which might be con- said she apparently was notjtrary to our vital interests." sexually molested. j Her_fiance, balding, beard- President, StTdUSS Hold Conference WASHINGTON L. Strauss conferred with CAMPBELL RIVER, B. C, wreckage of a D. S. Neptune bomber and skele- :ons of its II occupants Were 'ound today on a mountain- side near this Vancouver is- and community. H was be- ieyed to have crashed in 1951. A. Royal Canadian A i r Force search party made the report in a terse radio mes- sage from the level on Mt. McCreight. The ground'party from Co mox RCAF base went to the area Monday after Cpl. W. L. Glover, an airman stationed at the base, reported seeing the wreckage while fishing at Roberts Lake'. IN A MESSAGE to an air ed G. Robert Kinzie, 27, broke down when he returned to apartment after visiting; with friends at a coffee house in Hollywood. President Eisenhower today, Gene Fullmer. Brown told his news con-T ference the boxing business is "infiltrated with racket- eers and gangsters." "The whole thing smells to high he added. The governor said national aws seem the only answer since state action or inter state cooperation do not seem able to root out boxing's un- savory element. "I AM NOT satisfied hav- ng fights going on in Cali- fornia with men like Frank Carbo having an undisclosed he said. He said, however, that it is possible that the Califor nia Athletic Commission might be able to make things so tough for instance, by limiting fights to California the state could handle the situation. Brown said he had received a report from Atty. Gen Stanley Mosk on next Friday night's fight in San Francisco between Carmen -Basilic anc ary of the Athletic Commis- .ion, to look into it. He did not say he found mything illegal about tha Sasilio-Fullmer contest. He said it was a question of the distribution of purses. Cal- fornia law requires that a 'ighter retains two-thirds of his purse. Kinzie works as a ceramics Dut left the white Housej He said instructor at the nearby seeing newsmen. Jack Urch, versity of Southern Califor- (Continued Page A-2, Col. 6) he was asking executive secre- craft overhead, .the search party said the plane seared from documents at the scene to have crashed in 1951. Reports show a Neptune dis- appeared in the area in 1948 jut no such plane was re- ported in 1951. RCAF officials said positive identification would not be possible until the searchers returned to Comox later to- day. Another U. S. Neptune was discovered wrecked on same mountain in September 1951 and was identified as one reported .missing a year earlier aboard. with Only 11 nine persons persons were believed aboard the plane which disappeared in 1948. LARRY MOTHERWELL Slaying Suspect WHERE TO FIND IT A new housing bill has been approved by the House Banking Committee. See Page A-3. Texas U. Gets Moon Signal From England Beach B-I. Hal B-8. A-ll. C-4 to 9. B-6, 7. Death B-2. A-10. B-3. Shipping A-6. C-l, 2, 3. A-8. Tides, Vital A-ll. B-4, 5. Your A-2. MALVERN, England Radar signals were received in Texas today after being bounced off the moon by the Royal Radar Establishment here, the government an- nounced tonight. A Ministry of Supply spokesman said the bleep- sunding signals sent out by the 45-foot radio telescope here were received clearly by a smaller telescope at the Electrical Engineering Re- search Laboratory at the University of Texas. The spokesman said the ex- periment was the result of joint investigation by Mai vern experts and the Texas university scientists into the nature of the moon's surface 4 THE RADAR pulses, each of 5 microseconds duration and 2 megawatts power, were transmitted at a.rate of 250 pulses per second. Last May message sin Morse code and speech wer< transmitted by the Jodrel Bank radio telescope via moon and picked up by the U. S. Air Force research cen ter in Cambridge, Mass. Today's signals were radar pulses sent as. part of Mai- vern's research program to improve techniques of send- ing messages via the moon, Family of 4 Assaulted in S. F. Trailer SAN Denver FRANCISCO family of four was errorized early today by hree knife-wielding assail- ants who invaded their trailer In San Francisco. One raped the wife, while the others held knives at the hroat of the husband and two young daughters. They fled when the bus- land broke free and hurled one of the trio out the door of the trailer and through the .vindow of a gas station, next to which the trailer was parked. ALL THREE assailants, were captured .within four- wurs. Victims of the attack were [he vacationing Edward Fis' cher family. Officer Clem Deamicis lowed a trail of blood left by the man who .was hurled-' through the window. Thoss arrested" were Fred P.- Phil- lips, 23, a janitor; Tommis Jack Smith, 24, a and Frank B. Irwine, 20, uh Strong Quakes Jar islands in Pacific HONIARA, Solomon Is- lands Strong earth: temblors were reported todayv from .I.ilihini in the .New Georgia group of the West" as" well as to study the Splomons and Tatba on moon's surface. be! Island.   

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