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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 21, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 21, 1959, Long Beach, California                             MAPS BIG NEW BEAUTY CONTEST Nash, Confessed Killer of 11, Dies to Take Place in By HARRY JUPITER QUENTIN, Calif. Nash, con fessed killer of II persons, died in San Quentin's gas chamber today, smiling at the prosecutor who sent him there. -Just before the gas pellets-werti dropped, Nash said: "Unfortunately I've never been able to live; like a man. "However, I expect to die Then he- winked at J. Mil- er Leavy, deputy district, at- Angeles Couri ty-. Leavy, .who'has sent more thari a dozen'California killers to their', deaths, was witness- ing his first execution. Jfewtmg Neutpaptr Boy Meinhardt Says World Pageant to Top 'U' Contest By MARY NEISWENDER A Beauty no Miss a bathing suit no. bathing being planned for Long Beach next year after the city and the swimsuit company which owns the Miss U title decided to pany. Oscar Meinhardt, executive producer of the worldwide LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., FRIDAY, AUGUST Vol. 172 PRICE 10 CENTS 46 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily] in Artesia ARTESIA Nine-year-old Felix Martin Aguilera' was found safe just before noon today. He had been the object of a spreading search since he. wandered away from his home 32 hours ago. The boy was spotted by sheriff's deputies walking along ,the San Gabriel River bed-just north of Carson St. He was returned to his dis fraught parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Aguilera, 11958 E. 167th St., where a tearful reunion took place, recorded by dozens of news and television ''cameramen covering the JlTHE BOY TOLD officers he; spent Thursday: night in afr empty house. He gave no reason for leaving home. The lad disappeared at 7 'a.m. Thursday after telling 25, he was outside to feed his goat, and two ducks, The 'mothefnotlfied the Lakewood Sheriff S tat ion Ih'at her.-..son was: missing he still had not returned midafternoon. THE SEARCH TODAY con- Sehtrated in the area of Nor- walk Blvd. and E. 166th St. where construction workers .have cut four open trenches about 9-feet deep as prepara- tipiv for laying new sewer lines for the City of Norwalk Lt. George Walsh, head of the Lakewood station juvenile division, ordered workers to pump the water out.of all of .the-trenches. The dog, a Labrador re- ..'triever named Paladin, re- "I'ye never kept saic Living Cost at New High; Food Prices Pace Rise announced at a press conference STEPHEN NASH Said He Slew 11 Leavy, this is the only one I felt I had to watch." .It took 9% minutes for the cyanide gas' Nash. The >ellets were dropped at a.m. and he was pronounced dead at a.m. NASH WAS condemned specifically for. two 1956 stab- specta'cle, special Thursday night that he and the city's civic, leaders de- cided against renewal of ah agreement with the pageant's swimsuit .sponsor after the firm had asked for a "sub- stantial sum" of money for use of the title. THE EIGHT-Y E A R-O LD pageant, Meinhardt said, will be replaced by an interna- tional beauty contest in which the winner will be "Miss In- ternational and her public exposure will be lim- ited to "tastefully designed" piayclothes. But as the pageant lost one sponsor, two other agencies indicated they would support the new event.. The Long Beach Board of Harbor Com- missioners was preparing to draw up a. necessary resolu- tion to provide financial sup- port to the pageant, and an agreement1 is expected in a few days with cosmetics manufacturer Max Factor, of- ficials indicated. Meanwhile, John E. Watte Jr., president of the swimsuit concern, expressed his con- cern-over the.city's actions. Santa 'pier. He also admitted killing But if Long Beach "is out, he iit-bld Larry Rice under said, can be- definitely turned home, soaking wet, about two hours after :the disappearance. The boy has two brothers, Joey, Lye, 2, and a s'ister, .Corliss, 2 month. The boy.'s father is a driver for a I'.os Angeles. trucking coni- 'pifri'y admitted the slaying of John Berg, 26, whose body was found in a Long Beach apart- ment. The boy's father, H. G. Rice of Redondo, was among the witnesses to the execution. Nash, often called the most hated man in San Queritin, was the 164th condemned prisoner to'die in the gas chamber since it was built in 19.26. Never remorseful, Nash ate heartly Thursday night and this morning. After a large dinner of steak, french fries, apple pie and coffee, he stayed awake all night, talk- ing almost Constantly. Mostly he loudly harangued against the society with (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) stated that the Miss Universe Pageant will be moved to another city." There was speculation the city would be Miami Beach, Fla., but no names were officially an- nounced. "THE Watte said, "intends to continue the pageant... on an even larger and greater scale." According to the executive, the city move came as a "sur- prise" since a new contract was to be negotiated between the two factions next Thurs- day. Red Probers Cancel Calif. Teacher Quiz Subpoenaes for 60 Instructors Also Recalled WASHINGTON The House Committee on Un- American Activities will can- cel hearings scheduled Oct. 14 .for the investigation ol communism in the California school system. Subpoenaes issued for some 60; or 70 California school teachers also will be canceled. The committee plan became known today as a result of a letter sent by Chairman Fran- cis E. Walter (D-Pa) to Ar thur F. Corey, state executive Teachers Assn. COREY, in a letter dated Aug. 17, objected to delays m :he hearings and protested :hat the names of many of the teachers' involved had been made public.'.. Cnrey suggested 'that under Half i Cancels Arrest of Archbishop "P.ORT AU PRINCE, Haiti (ff> government today abruptly withdrew an order arrest of Msgr..Fran- cois Poirier, Roman Catholic archbishop of Port au Prince. The arrest order in a wid- ening split between the gov- ernment and church in. pre- dominantly Catholic Haiti had the threat of excom munication for leaders of this .Negro republic. ffe had been ordered seized after he ignored a summons appear at the district at- '.tprney's office. (A high Vatican source said Haitian government leaders who are Catholics might incur automatic t x communication from the church if Arch- Bishop Poirier is arrested good Vat- sources said they could .find no record of any high Roman Catholic prelate being 'arrested in a non-Communist ,country since World War II.) '.A justice department spokesman said the arrest ordered because the criticized the government for expelling two One was the head of Urgest Catholic col- Weather- Mostly clear tonight but some early-morning clouds near- the coast Saturday. Mostly sunny Saturday and little change in temperature. Watte said in a specially prepared statement, "has deeply appreciated the cooperation and efforts of the people of Lon% Beach and we are extremely sorry that the joard of directors of the Long Beach Beauty Congress would not, after eight years 'of asso- ciation, delay their decision one week until a new contract could be worked out." HOWEVER, Meinhardt and representatives of the Beauty group of some 60 (Continued Page A-4, Col. 4) the law, district boards of education should be given such information as the com- mif.tce may have.and be per mitted to suspend or dismiss the teachers who cannot give satisfactory answers to ques tions put to them. i IN HIS REPLY, Walter said he welcomed the suggestion to transmit to the district boards "the names of such teachers so that they may be interrogated by such boards which would then transmit t the committee the copy of thi transcript of the proceed ings.' Numbers Jackpots Near Total of i Prize-money awards neared today in The Press- Telegram's 'Lucky Social Se: curity Numbers contest. A total of 111 winners has been awarded in cash. Among the winners were Jackie Newman of 233 E. Wil- MCiOE NEWMAN Winner. ow St., whose Social Security number was worth and Mrs. Irwin Link of 57-B W. 52nd St. Here are 11 new lucky numbers (deadline Monday, Aug. 24, 5 562-14-0143 524-46-7142 54S-18-12M 565-30-2449 554-44-86M M5-264532 184-28-5131 573-47-4311 Wednesday's lucky numbers (deadline, Friday, Aug. 21, 1959, 5 548-56-9553 572-38-7W4 4O43-2MI S45-34-7M1 54A-18-47M 5M-S2-9N2 M3-32-MM Top-Secref Jet Bomber Disappears LONDON Ships an planes searched the coasts o England today for a clue t the baffling disappearance Britain's newest top-secret je bomber. The crescent-winged Victo Mark II, carrying four crew men and a scientist, vanishe Thursday on a test fligh without radioing a word afte taking off from Boscome the south of England. The Victor, reputed to b the world's fastest and high est-flying bomber, may hav blown up in flight. A Britis tanker reported hearing an e> plosion .between the Wels and Irish coasts. Several other ships reporte  Vital D-2 B-l! B-4, UT MIGHTY HARD ON DESERT MOUSE ni Blast-out Easy on Ffierf Wage Boost By RALPH DIGHTON LOS ANGELES pilot Al Blackburn, first man to blast out of a bomb shelter in a rocket-boosted et plane, says: "It was a snap for me, mt you should have seen he mouse." Blackburn was referring to a desert mouse acci- dentally caught in the cave- ike shelter at Holloman Air Force Base, N. M., at the time of blast-off Wednes- day. "The mouse staggered out stunned and shaken but was definitely Blackburn said. "I think he must have heard the labora- tory people saying, 'Let's ;rab him and check him because he got'right up and 'scampered off." BLACKBURN USED mouse incident to he dangers of his feat in an interview after relurn- ng to his home here. 'That mouse was ex- posed.'to. the full-blast and wise, of the Blackburn said. "I was protected inside the plane md the plane was out of the shelter in less than a second." Blackburn, 36-year-old pilot from North American Aviation, had undergone 14 such blast-offs earlier at Ed- wards Air Force Base, iden- tical except that they were out in the open. The ter take-off was made to prove that planes can be protected from sneak nu- clear attack and still be ready for a quick counter- blow. Blackburn's supersonic F100 was airborne after a take-off of less than one inch the distance the plane moved before break- ing the shear-bolts that held it in the shelter. or Press Wlrtpholo FLIES PLANE FROM BOMB SHELTER Pilot Al Blackburn Says Rocket Test Was a Snap The booster rocket, at- tached below the tail of the plane, built up a pressure of pounds of thrust equal to that de- veloped by a Thor inter- mediate-range missile. Four seconds after blast-off the jet was doing 275 miles an hour and the booster dropped away. Tn another few seconds the jet's own engine was propelling it faster than sound more than 750 miles an hour. BLACKBURN SAID the tremendous acceleration creating pressures four times that of normal gravity extremely high noise level had no effect on his ability to manage the plane. Blackburn, president of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, said the. test proved his contention that tomorrow's missiles can and must be manned. He "If we were to put men in missiles to make the nec- e s s a r y corrections there would be a lot fewer fail- Rockefeller, Anne Rehearse Wedding By RELMAN MORIN SOGNE, Norway wedding is my life, and I will remember it for the rest of my life." The speaker was Steven Rockefeller, standing on the steps of the Lunde Lutheran Church where Saturday he will marry Anne Marie Rasmussen. The son of New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller spoke to newsmen after the wedding rehearsal, in which he and iis financee were joined by lis mother, Anne Marie's par- ents, the six ushers, the >ride's six attendants and the Rev. Olav Guatwtad. The ceremony will be most- ly in Norwegian, with' some English. Statehood for Hawaii Set Today .WASHINGTON W) Ha- Several hundred newsmen and out- side during the rehearsal. When it was Anne Marie and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Kristian Rasmussen, fled through the churchyard and disappeared. STEVEN came out on the steps and said he wanted to explain why no photographers will be permitted inside the church during the ceremony Saturday, and why only five (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) Moforship Sinks; Fear 100 Perish MANILA (ffi A Philip- line interisland motorship ank in stormy waters off the lorthern coast of Palawan sland, and first reports today ndicated more than 100 might have perished. The Philippine navy and air force launched rescue op- erations in what could be one of the country's worst peace- waii, a group. of volcanic and and sank early Thursday, coral islands mile's west of San Francisco, officially oins the Union today as the nation's 60th state. President Eisenhower ar- ranged a 4 p.m. ceremony ait the White House to proclaim statehood .for the territory after a 56-year effort by Ha waiian citizens, now number- ing Besides signing the state- hood proclamation today, the designating a new 50-star Flag to become officially effective next July 4. The new banner will taki the place of the 49-star Flag which became official onl; last July 4. Workers Due All Major Services Share in Index Advance WASHINGTON The cost of. living rose three- tenths of' 1 per cent in July to another record high, the government reported today. The Labor Department said higher prices for all major classes of goods and services contributed to the advance, with food prices leading the way. The consumer price indea for July was 124.9 per cent of the 1947-49 average, eight- tenths of 1 per cent higher than in July 1958. s THE INCREASE will mean wage boosts to about one million workers, primarily in the automobile, farm'Tequip' ment and aircraft industries. Herssy E. Riley, chief of the'department's division 'at prices and cost of living, said most of the affected workers will receive a quarterly raise of 2 cents an hour. He said this is the first in- crease for automobile work- ers since last July. Riley said the increase from June to July was "pret- ty much a result of seasonal factors. Only twice since 1941 have food prices declined-in July and the average increase for that month is five-tenths of 1 per cent." FOOD PRICES increased four-tenths of 1 per cent oyer the prior month this year. The cost of eggs went up 18 per. cent, much more than usual for the season. An advance in beef and poultry prices offset some de- clines in fresh fruits and vege- tables. "We are quite certain from what we see now that food prices will drop in August, but we can't tell just how (Continued Page A-4, Col. I) ime maritime disasters. Radio messages from the area in the west central 'hilippines said the Manila- bound ship Pilar H capsized lours-after leaving the north Palawan port of Bacuit. FIRST WORD came from a :ishing vessel today, which radioed it was picking up sur- ivors. The Civil Aeronautics Res- cue Center reported only six aassengers and five crewmen iad been rescued before night set in. One surviving crewman Rocket Fires Early, Test Is Failure WASHINGTON escape rocket fired pre- maturely today and wrecked an attempt to test rescue methods for the men who will make the first space flights. The blast lobbed a full-size space capsule into the surf off the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's. test station on Wallops Island on the Virginia eastern shore. NASA SAID the premature firing occurred 20 minutes before the capsule was to have been launched by firing of the main propulsion en- President issues an order was quoted as saying more than 100 persons were aboard the boat but this was not at first confirmed. The Pilar II was described as a 240-ton ship with space for 83 passengers and 29 crew. gme. The rocket that blew off ahead of time was one in- tended to. kick -the capsule' free from the main rocket'in the event of. emergency. The capsule, was'.to been launched to great height by a Little Joe booster rocket at a. m; At.the top of it's flight the escape rocket was to have been fired for test purposes. NASA said there were "no injuries.   

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