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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 19, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 19, 1959, Long Beach, California                             QUAKE AVALANCHES BLOCK RESCUES teavy Skies (eep Copters THIS IS AN'AIR VIEW ot Madison River. Canyon after i mountainside was dis- lodged by earthquake down from left to cover Madison River and Montana State Hwy. No. 1 adjoining the river. The slide, biggest of many that occurrecUin the rugged area west of Yellowstone National Park, thun- dered down'in darkness to engulf vacationers along -the river. Some were killed, many are still missing. This huge pile of new 250 to 300 feet deep, a quarter-mile across and a mile long. Dark-pattern at left, is .made up of thousands of smashed evergreeii trees.: Water, of river is dammed up at lower left. Photo was taken looking approximately south- west out. to the plains beyond the mouth of the Wirephoto.) Numbers Secret Russ Offer Gome Pays on Berlin Reported Ninety-eight winners have claimed in The Press- Telegram's Lucky Numbers game and 11 new lucky Social Security' numbers are listed in today's paper. Ope of the happy winners Mrs. Paul Ben- nett, of 3932 Fairman St., Lakewood, whose husband re- ceived in the contest. TO ENTER the contest, which is now in its third week, just write or print your name and Sociay Security number on mail it to a postcard 'and The Press-Tele- gram, 604 Pine Ave., Beach 12. Long If your number is selected as a bring your So- cial Security card and identi- fication to the I, P-T business office before the stipulated deadline. Today's lucky numbers 'Friday, Aug. 21, 1959, 5 M8-56-K53 (SSfl) 555-4t4448 529-32-2282 568-52-0962 542-32-3699 Tuesday's lucky numbers (deadline, Thursday, Aug. 20, 1959, 5 p.rn.y. 345-42-5215 .519-01-2208 42849-7295 38M1-40M ,54949-1021 572-24-5282 541-10-5887 WASHINGTON Milton Eisenhower i reported to have brought to his brother, the Presiden a .new proposal by Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush chev for a long-term solution on Berlin. Authoritative sources said today Khrushchev uh veiled his plan at a private meeting witirMilton Eisen hower during Eisenhower's recent trip to Russia wit Vice President Richard M. Nixon. Khrushchev's proposal wa said to be essentially as fo lows: The Soviets will agree let the West German govern ment take over Comraunis encircled West guaranteed access to the cit' Launch New Satellite at Vandenberg VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. sixth satellite-rocket, in the trouble plagued Discoverer series roared out toward space today. In its nose was a capsule which the Air Force hopes to snatch from the air over Ha- waii needle-in- the-haystack feat never yet accomplished. Today's highly instrument; ed capsule carried no animals but is similar to the on ex- pected to take monkeys into space later in the series. V, fired from this West Coast missile base Thursday, performed perfect- ly-until time came to eject the capsule on the 17th orbit the following day. The. capsule's radio.beacon failed to func- tion and it apparently fell into the Pacific 'undetected by search planes and ships: Weather- Cloudy late tonight and early Thursday. Sunny Thursday after- noon. Little change In teinpmture. Maximum temperature by noon to- day: provided, the western allie withdraw from there.- President Eisenhower ha let' it be kn.dwn that he wi listen to any new ide Khrushchev migh t have 'o the troublesome German que tion when the Kremlin lead comes to Washington nex month. Milton Eisenhower was de cribed as favoring the Khrusl chev plan. Some State De (Continued Page A-6, Bulldozer Probe for More Bodies in Slide Delayed WEST YELLOWSTONE vlont. MP) Earthquake-born avalanches stifl trapped camp rs and fishermen in the wilt mountains of southwest Mon ana today. The known death toll .wa: ight but officials feared i might rise to 13. Many idn't know the mddled at a make-shift camp ;round on a hillside wher hey were supplied Tuesda; night by air with blankets water, food and cigarettes. Leaden skies today stalle a helicopter airlift rescue op era tion.- t Si THE OVERCAST also.de ayed start of a bulldoze >rdbe into the huge slide a lock Creek vhere the top of a mountai: ;ave way Monday night an> created a new hill 200 to 30 !eet high. -This search was t determine whether othe quake victims may-be bu'rie the debris." Four of the dead were from one family. They were F. R Bennett, 45, of Coeu D'Alene, Idaho; his tw daughters, Carole, 17, an Susan, 5, and a son Tom, I Bennett's wife and anothe son, Phillip, 15, were injure: OTHER KNOWN DBA! were Mrs. Margaret Holme Billings, Mont.; Mr..and Mr E. H. Stryker, Berkele; Calif.; and an unidentifie girl about 8. Missing are Thomas Ston 31, of Sandy, Utah, and h wife. A 15-year-old survivo Martin .Stryker of Berkeley told today how his fathe and stepmother, Mr. and Mr Stryker, died in'the. slides. "They couldn't have know what hit he said. MARTIN and his brother John, 13, and Morgan, were sleeping in a separai tent 20 feet away. "We could hear tree he said. "Whe we got out of. the tent tw trees had fallen across ou car and another crushed ou boat." Then a tremendous roa echoed' down the mounta seconds before the avalanch hit the parents' tent.' Three helicopters w e r poised at West Yellowston to operate the airlift to brin out the persons in the laki area above the Madison Rive Valley, where the quake Monday night and Tuesda hit with the most force. at MANY GOT out Tuesda (Continued Page A-6, Col. 5 Report British Plane Crashed, 29 Killed BARCELONA, Spain (UP British airliner was r ported to have crashed nej here today. First reports sa: 29 persons on board wer killed. Reports from the scene sa: the plane crashed in tl Montseny Mountains, aboi 25 miles north of Barcelon on Spain's Mediterranea coast. The aircraft was c'arrj ing a group of British sti dents from Barcelona t London. HOME The Somhland't Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 1959 Vol. 170 PRICE 10 CENTS 76 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE Z-5959 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) AFTER QUAKE TERROR INJURED CAMPER CARRIED TO PLANE Ray Painter, 46, is carried by volunteers from helicopter to evacuation plane at West Yellowstone, Mont. Painter and family were in Forest Service camp- ground in Madisoh River canyon Tuesday when earthquake shook down a mammoth earthslide into the canyon, covering road and river. Additional earthquake pictures are on Pages A-3, A-6, B-l and Wirepholo.) Cracks 30 Feet Deep in Temblor Cracks as deep as 30 feet in their property were de- scribed today by Howard and Grace Wells, former residents of the Long Beach area who operate the Kirkwood Ranch Motel near the center of the earthquake zone at West Yel- lowstone. Mrs. Wells talked to 'The Indepenedent, Press-Telegram today over telephone lines just restored to their place about three miles from Hebgen Dam, focal point of the shattering tremors of Monday night and Tuesday morning. ALTHOUGH there were 45 guests at the Wells place at the time of the quake, no one was injured. Some guests were thrown-out of their beds by the force of the midnight shock, Mrs. Wells said. Walls of _ the main house were cracked and other damage in- flicted to buildings. The cracks in the earth, most spectacular result of the quake at the Wells place, ranged from eight to 30 feet deep. Mrs. Wells said that their place, which they have owned since 1952 when they left after many years residence here, was used in rescue oper- ations. Some of the campers driven from campsites near the dam were brought to the Kirkwood ranch. We built a big bonfire and spent the rest of the night in the she said. "Our power was off so we got out some old .wood stoves for cooking and warmth. It was pretty exciting." 2 Mountains Now Where One Stood By JERRY O'BRIEN HELENA, Mont. peak had n name. It does now. "Call it, 'Earthquake a man said. "Jus look at it." 'The top was gone, jerked from the place where i had stood for ages by a terrible twist of the earth. I crashed down in the darkness on sleeping dozens o vacationers along the Madison River in southwester Montana. When the rumbling wa over, nature had left almos two mountains. The new haps "Little Earthquake from now 250 to 3C feel high, and a quarter-mi long from canyon wall t canyon wall. It lies jcross the Madiso Late Mart Rally Cuts Big Drop NEW YORK prices broke sharply this aft- ernoon but rallied toward the final hour. Heavy selling clipped SI to or more a share from fa- vorite issues at one time with steels, motors, rubbers, chem- icals and rails pacing the de- cline. But by-mid-afternoon prices started to bounce back from their .lows. The Dow Jones average at 2 p.m. was off as much as 9.46 at 641.33. An hour ear- lier it was down 8.23 at 642.56. Steels a.nd motors led the late rebound with some is- sues shaving their losses by considerable margins. U. S. Steel crossed the tape at off 75 cents, after trading at Chrysler, down at earlier in the afternoon, jumped to off 75 cents. Lukens, trading at cut a loss to 20 OTHERS ON USS WASP INJURED Blast, Fire on Carrier Kilts 2 QUONSET POINJi R. I. pilot, seated in his helicopter aboard the. Navy carrier Wasp, was killed late 1'uesday when the. engine exploded, A second Navy man apparently was asphyxiated as he fought the resulting fire. A score of other-Navy men suffered injuries, mostly burns, but only one was seriously hurt. Another suffered a broken leg. All the rest were back on their jobs today. This was the report of Rear Adm. Robert Stroh as the carrier arrived in grim silence today at the naval air station1 here where anxious relatives awaited the big ship. The Wasp was on maneuvers 250 miles off the Virginia coast when the blast occurred. Stroh said an investigation Is being started to find out what went wrong with the helicopter engine. The dead: Lt. (j.g.) Jim Frank Hagan of Mariunna, and Aviation Apprentice Donald Howard Trask'of'Keene, N. H. The latter was trapped in an elevator pit as he bat- tled the flames. The fire destroyed three helicopters but the damage to the ship was confined to Hanger Bay No. 1, the forward compartment of three bays below the flight deck. Aboard at the time were some civilian guests of the Secretary of the Navy. They were from Lafayette, La., but were at once. Also aboard were four Brazilian air officers and the Wasp's complement 'of Four destroyers, taking part in the maneuvers, helped fight the fire. It was brought under control in 50 minutes but flared up again. H was finally extinguished in another 20 minutes. Stroh issued a statement praising the crew for "ex- peditious handling of a situation which might have be- come a catastrophe." River. Behind it is the frigh ened town of Ennis. Seve miles in front of it is th scattered, pocked marke Hebgen Dam. In the middl were people, trapped betwee a 1915 power dam that too years to build and an awe some mountain created i seconds by nature. With them were expensiv trailers, station wagons, car and tents. No thought o them now. THOSE WHO LIVE through the 'nightmare tol stories they could hardly lieve themselves. The storie were mostly the eerie awakening to a horrib noise, an unearthly shakin of the entire earth itself, the stillness. Grover C. Mault is 71, o vacation from Temple Cit. Calif. He and his 68-year-oldj Acid Thrown at Solon in J. S. Capital 'Middle1 Labor Bill Supporter Suffers Only Slight Burn WASHINGTON CT) Rep. rank Thompson (D-NJ) to- ay said "a crank" tossed a luid which he believed was cid into his automobile as le drove to the Capitol Tues- lay. The fluid, hurled from a >assing panel truck, burned a lole in Thompson's shirt and marred the" paint on his auto.- mobile. Congressional ales said Thompson had a mrn on his shoulder the size of a dime. Thompson played a leading role in House, consideration ast week of a labor-control as a backer of a Demo- cratic-sponsored measure op- posed by most union leaders, flic House first turned down i more limited measure and lien passed a still more stringent bill than Thompson advocated. A SOURCE close to Thomp- son was quoted as reporting the congressman said he had REP. FRANK THOMPSON Reports Acid been getting anonymous threats over his labor-bill'ac- tivities. In answering reporters' questions, however, Thomp- son attached no significance to the incident of the fluid. He attributed it to "the work of a crank." Police said Thompson told them it was possible he had angered the men in the truck by inadvertently cutting across their path in traffic. A sample of the fluid was obtained from the side of Thompson's car and the -FBI was testing it to determine what it was. e THOMPSON MADE -no public statement on the affair until he was asked about-a wife hod picked a quiet spot published story. along the Madison for their evening camp. They were in. their trailer, a below the dam. They heard the rockslidej ahead, then saw the quiet river surge up. They climbed (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) Questioned again after a (Continued Page A-6, Col. 2) WHERE TO FIND IT Additional stories about Montana earthquake and pic- ture on Page A-3. Beach B-I. Hal B-ll. B-ll. C-9 to 15. C-4, C-5. B-I 4. Death B-2. B-10. B-3.. Shipping Page C-9. C-l to C-8. L-5. Tides, TV, C-l6. Vital C-9. B-ll. B-7. Your A-2. Jet Explodes in Midair; Pilot Killed OAKLAND UP) A Navy supersonic jet fighter plane exploded in the air today and the pilot was killed. His name was withheld. The plane was one of three which were returning to the Alameda Naval Air Station after a training mission. One plane vanished from radar screens at a.m..- A fireball appeared-shortly afterward and was reported by Fred Andrews, Hayward police officer. A search was started mediately and the wreckage was spotted about 8 a.m. near the top of Palo- mares- Canyon southeast of Oakland.   

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