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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 17, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 17, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Suzanne Born Aboard Plane ADM. BURKE FEARS RUSSIA HAS MISSILE SUBMARINES Press WTreobolo MOM BACK ON GROUND WITH AIRBORN BABY Mrs. Hugh Ector Holds Suzanne at Memphis Hospital 2-Car Crash Sets Record; 11 Die, 6 Hurt COLUMBIA, Mo. cars smashed head-on Sunday night in a rending crash thai killed 11 persons, a record toll for an automobile accident in Missouri, Six others were injuret MEMPHIS, Tenn. Suzanne Ector squalled into his world 10 days ahead of time and feet over Mis- souri Sunday. Mrs. Hugh Ector, 27, of Argenta, B. C., Canada gave birth to the 8-ppund, 4-ounce jirl in an airliner with the stewardess and two-passen- gers as midwives. Mother and daughter are no longer up in the air. They were taken to a Memphis hospital after the Delta Air Lines planes landed here and are doing fine. Mrs. Ector was en route from Canada to visit her par- ents at Sylvarena, Miss. She the two cars. Six of thejfelt the first faint labor pains dead were adults were children. other persons were shaken up. They were in a third car that skidded into the wreckage eight miles east of Columbia on U. S. High- way 40. ONE WRECKED CAR was owned by G. W. Eddy of White Hall, III., and the other by Leroy Thompson, 31, of Richmond, Mo. Officers struggled through the night trying to identify the victims in the tangled and scattered wreckage. The injured were either hurt too badly or were too young to help. THOSE IDENTIFIED ten (atively as dead: and fivelat Chicago, but figured she would reach Jackson, Miss., in plenty of time. She was wrong. MIT Prof Dies in Fall From Hotel Naval Cites Soviets on Red Rockets Fired Beneath Surface Believed Probable WASHINGTON Arleigh Burke, chief of naval operations, said today Russia probably has submarines able to launch ballistic missiles. The United States still is only building the first of its submarines which will be able lo launch Polaris mis- siles. At a news conference, Burke was asked if Russian submarines now are able to fire only the slow, air-breath- ing missiles or the swift, high protectory ballistic missiles. He replied: "I think they probably have both." He added that the Russians have been doing a great deal of work in the submarine and missile field. Burke did not say how many ballistic-mis- sile submarines he thought Russia might have. A UNTIL NOW, U.S. Navy officials had suggested that Soviet submarines probably were capable of handling only the air-breathing missiles Relatively slow, there are essentially unmanned, robot- controlled bombers which can be intercepted by some anti- aircraft missiles. There is no known counterweapon capa- ble of intercepting ballistic missiles, though the United The Finest Evening Newtpaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 1959 .Vol. No. 168 PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE S-H81 28 PAGES CLASSIFIED UK S-SttoB HOME EDITION {Six Editions Daily) Nation Mourns Halsey's Death End of Mercy Dash Ticket Row of Heart Attack Seen Today BOSTON A man Identified by police as Wil- liam Rupert Maclauri'n, 52, professor of economics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, today toppled to States is .working on the problem. Ajr-breathirig missiles 'can be fired only from the sur- face. Burke said in' answer to a question. Ballistic mis- siles can be launched from submarines 'hiding well be- low. FISHERS ISLAND, N. Y. Eisen- hower led the nation today in mourning the' death of Fleel Adm. William F. (Bull) Halsey. Halsey, 76, died here Sunday of, a heart attack while vacationing. In Washington the Navy1 said Halsey's body will re- uain at St.-Albans Chapel on Long Island until it is flown 0 the national capital Wednesday.. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at the Wash ngton National Cathedral. Burial with full military hon ors.Will follow at Arlington National Cemetery He gained fame as the ad- miral who chased the Japan- ese fleet to its death in the Pacific in World War II. Eisenhower, who heard the news of Halsey's death at Gettysburg, Pa., said he hac lost a warm personal friend and the nation one of it 'great natural leaders." O i "HIS GREAT personal con tributions to the successfu campaigns in the Pacific am the exploits of [he forces un der his command are a bri! liant part of American mili tary said Eisen riower. ONLY FOUR MEN hav (Continued Page A-5, Col. 5 Burke said he thought it possible that a.Russian sub- marine sighted and photo- graphed last May near Ice- death from .ttje roof of a land had missile-launching Back Bay hotel. capability. He said it was im- A distinguished educator possible to determine from Gus W. Eddy, White Hall, 111. about GO, Mrs. Helen Eddy, about 60, his'wife. Billy Junior Eddy, 27, and author, born in Welling- jton, New Zealand, Maclaurin has held a at since 1942 and had served with the Office of Scientific Research and De-i Saves Victim of Cobra fangs Solons Eye New Bill on Housing WASHINGTON UP) The Senate takes up today a new housing bill to replace one which President Eisenhower vetoed. There was a possibility the measure might go to ihe White House by late in the day. If the Senate acts in time, the House may fake it up at once under a rules sus-late I1lis afternoon will pension procedure requiring wealthy oilman ROB !4 DRIVERS photographs whether that submarine was able to launch missiles from underwater (Continued Page A-5, Col. 2) White Hall, III., a son. Denise Eddy, 4. of Mrs. Dave Thomas, Spring- field, III. These four victims were in one car. t THOSE RIDING in the other car who were killed were Mrs. Jessie Thompson, Richmond, Mo.; a woman be- lieved to be Mrs. Delbert Thompson, St. Louis, her mother-in-law; two unidenti- fied girls about 12 or 13 years old, and three infants, be lievcd to be Donna Marie Thompson, 2; Linda Kay Thompson, 3, and Patricia Kay Thompson, a foster daughter of Mrs. Jessie Thompson and her husband, Leroy. saulting fall which landed lis body 15 feet beyond the sidewalk. vclopment in Washington. A man who stood across from the Sheraton laza, at Copley Square, said ic saw a man come to the edge of the roof and look down at the motor traffic. He said the man then toppled over the edge in a somer- 9 Hurt in Crash of Two Trains GULL LAKE, Sask. UPI Two Americans and seven Canadians were severely in- jured here Sunday in a col lision between a freight train and a Canadian Pacific pas- senger train. 97 Winners Share in Numbers Awards Ninety-seven winners and a cash bonanzi are the totals in the Press-Telegram's Lucky Numbers game, with the listing of 11 new lucky Social Security numbers in today's paper. Faulty Gear Forces Jet to Return NEW YORK (Jf) A cock- pit warning signal caused a 'an American Airways jet airliner to return to Idlewild Airport today shortly after it took off for Buenos Aires .vith 122 persons aboard. The Boeing 707 jet plane dumped some of its fuel loac in the Atlantic before return- ing to the field. It made safe landing. C 4 THE DIFFICULTY was the latest in a series involving the'Boeing 707 planes, largest of the new pure-jet airliners. Officials said a faulty pump caused the hydraulic system to lose fluid and the pressure to fail. The system operates the plane's landing gear. The pilot had to use a standby electrical system to lower the wheels for the re- turn landing. Mrs. Wanda O. Reed, 6373 St. Louis Ave.', claimed a prize over the weekend in the contest, which enters its third week today. Another winner was Paul O. Bennett, of 3932 Fair- man St., Lakewood. t 0 U 4 TO ENTER THE contest, write or print your name, ad- dress and Social Security card number on a post card and mail it to The Independ- ent, Press-Telegram, 604 Pine Avc., Long Beach 12. If your number is selected as a winner, bring your So Bandits Thaw Good Humor HOLLYWOOD people at the Good Humor Co. ice cream plant were in no such humor at all. Three armed men forced their into the plant Sunday night, police said, and tied up seven em- ployes. They then went to the cashier's office and tried to get Howard John- son to open the safe. When lie protested he couldn't do it, the gunmen forced 14 ice-cream-truck drivers to empty their pockets of cash. They yanked the tele- phone from the wall and locked Johnson and the drivers in a storage room. Police said they got away with about a two-thirds vote. The bill-is trimmed down below the total in the measure Eisenhower vetoed last month. But it still retains all of; the major pro- grams of the earlier version in a .reduced form. s THE VETO WAS upheld in the Senate last Wednes- day on a 55-40 vote, 9 short I of the two-thirds needed to override.' The Senate Bank- ng Committee then whipped out the substitute bill Thurs- day. I Sen. John Sparkman CD- floor manager for the measure, predicted in ad- vance of the debate it would be approved promptly. And he conceded the bill had been shaped with the idea that the House could lake it without change. No official word has come from the administration, how ever, that President Eisen- hower is willing to accept the new measure. Poulson Denies L A. Withdraws Convention Bid By MURRAY FROMSON LOS ANGELES cratic National Chairman Paul Butler today was expected to announce an end to the ticket argument that threatened to cost Los Angeles the party's I960 convention. Republican Mayor Norris Poulson, denying a Chicago lewspaper report that Los Angeles had withdrawn its offer to hold the convention said: "I'm positive it will be held here." Conspicuously absent from a conference scheduled for be Edwin O. by many Pauley, credited with raising most of the necessary to under- Continued Page A-5, Col. 3) New Hosts Reported for Demo Parley By DORIS FLEESON (Copyrfohl bv UnlletJ Fealyrc Syndicate! long and undignified squabble over spectator seats at the Demo- cratic National Convention next July is ending with the naming of a new host com- mittee and a nonprofit fi nance corporation. The Los Angeles hosts to the conven- tion will receive the tickets original com- mittee rejected as insuffi cient. Press Wlreoholo SNAKE'S VICTIM COMFORTED BY WIFE William White Has Bandage on. Bitten Left Hand ST. JOSEPH, Mo. four-fool-long Indian cobra bit an employe of a reptile garden near here Sunday. Bui the victim may live because of a dramatic flight from Miami, Fla. The Coast Guard and the Air Force flew anticobra serum from Miami to St. Jo- Warren Tells Berlin of U. S. Interest seph after 32-year-old Wil- liam White was bitten. The serum was administered six hours after the accident. A single drop of cobra venom can be fatal. And, usu- ally it takes only four hours to kill, said William H. llaast, operator of the Miami Ser- pentorium. But the cobra's fangs National Chairman Butler pierced a sack of heavy ma- terial before they hit White will disclose this solution to T r Ihe long impasse in Los An geles this afternoon. THE DISTRIBUTION which jently absorbed some of the BERLIN Earl War- seems (fair chief justice of roughly a third oanh tho 1 rtc Annolnc ren. United States, flew into Westj each to the Los Angeles MM. hosts, to the California state Berlin today and told its cit lho zens: "I want you to know that your city is in the hearts of all Americans." FIND BLOODY, TORN TRUNKS organization and to the party leaders of the remaining 49 states. Barring last-minute hitches, he has won his point. said HOSPITAL White, who attendant has been bitten about 100 times by nonpoisonous snakes during his four years at the reptile garden, remarked as serum was injected: Decision Not Set, Rocky Says ALBANY, N. Y. Nelson A. Rockefeller said today he had not commited himself to any timetable for deciding whether to seek the Republican presidential nomi- nation. He thus denied a report of two weeks ago that he had fixed an early November deadline for .his decision. Rockefeller also told a news conference that public- "I knew all the time I'd be Ihe'.opinion polls would not be the only factor in his decision. His chief concern, he said, Fear Shark Killed Florida Skin-Diver iwas whether he could be of The Methodist Hospital re- real service to the Oilman Edwin Pauley, the at micinlorning white whether hc could deal "ef- powerhouse behind the ong-jappeared {Q be jn good condj. fectively and constructively" mal host committee s demand tjon Eariier Dr C C DuMont with the critical, problems :for 5.000 tickets, flew in reporlcd his condition that lie ahead. Mexico City for a final j a t chance to re-; ROCKEFELLER insisted cial Security card and identi fication to The I, P-T business office before the stipulated deadline. Today's lucky numbers are: (deadline, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 4-15-03-7187 02GJ2-2012 441-16-8332 522-03-2444 402-10-3489 586-36-7293 SfiO-36-2377 M4-36-OJ22 202-07-3031 Two Fires Started in Homes of Negroes CHICAGO WP> Police stood guard today at a two- story west side apartment wilding where two small 'ires were started a few hours after three Negro families moved in. The building is in a pre- dominantly white neighbor hood. Detectives said arsonists, using ,paint and gasoline, ig- nited one blaze Sunday on a rear porch outside the apart- ment of the only while family in the four-flat building. PANAMA CITY. Fla. Ripped, bloodstained swim trunks and teeth-marked mask and flippers were the only traces today of a skin- diving Army lieutenant. Navy divers said Lt. James C. Neal of Ft. Ruck- er, Ala., apparently fell vic- tim to roving sharks while on a pleasure cruise in the Gulf of Mexico. Ft. Rucker said Ncal, 26, was a resident of Superior, Wis. the Army listed him as "missing." Neal and some friends took turns following a ca- ble, leading 80 feet down. The second time Neal went down he didn't come back. 4 4 THE NAVAL mine de- fense laboratory in Panama City reported its divers had recovered Neal's flippers, mask and lead weights, and pieces of his undershirt and bathing trunks. They said (he equipment bore teeth marks and the torn cloth- ing was spotted with what appeared to be blood. Gary Seymour, 21, of Panama City, who was skindiying in the area when Neal disappeared Saturday, said he tried to find the Army officer. Seympur said two sharks attacked him near a rock formation, and that he barely escaped. Crewmen of a chartered fishing boat reported catch- ing a 12-foot shark in the vicinity that day and hook- ing another larger one that got away. Navy divers had to quit looking for Neal Saturday because of shark activity. jto wring from the chairman a compromise. When Butler's answer wasj "sorry, Pauley flew to his island estate in Ha- vaii. Butler then rouned up the >arty figures who had previ-S' ously agreed to stand by for a crash landing. said Dr. DuMonl. "I think he'll be OK." that he was still not a candi- date for the GOP nomination. The doctor said White hasjijut he attempted to clarify experienced some, symptoms !of cobra WHERE TO FIND IT President Eisenhower has received another plea for help in settling the steel strike. Page A-3. arly stiffening of the joints legs and low pressure. his attitude toward the presi- dential race. AT WHITE'S bedside was his wife, Ruby. They have daughter, Joy, 10, and a son, The report about the No- deadline stemmed from the national governors' conference in Puerto Rico. Rockefeller said "Polls are reality of political life but Beach B-l Hal A-9 A-S C-4 to 9 B-6, 7 C-4 A-6 Shipping C-4 C-l, 2, 3 A-4 TV, B-8 Vital C-4 A-7 B-4, S, 6 Your A-2 garden, John Flinchpaugh, (Continued Page A-5, Col. 6) Robin, 5. The owner of the reptile Child Electrocuted in Family Pool SAN GA" 5 arently was day in the year-old b electrocute family swimi.iing pool when an underwater light short-cir- cuited. Alfred Marshall Sr. said he felt a slight shock when he reached in the. water to pul his son's body the shal low end. obviously they are only one 'actor in trying to determine public trends and public re- actions." Rockefeller said he would leave Thursday night. for Norway to attend the wedr ding of his son, Anne Marie Rasmussen, a Norwegian girl who once worked as a maid in ths Rockefeller household. Weather- Night and morning low clouds with mostly sunny afternoons! Little in temperature.   

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