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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 12, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 12, 1959, Long Beach, California                             FOUND WANDERING DOWNTOWN Tots Identified, Police Hunt for Missing Mom POLICE CLUB, ARREST LITTLE ROCK RIOTERS HOME THESE BLOND, BLUE-EYED, BOYS sit in the Juvenile BureauTere this morn- ing just after being awakened for breakfast and before they were identified as twins Larry and Garry Welsh, They were found on a street here Tues- day. Blonde Puts Missouri Out of Business JEFFERSON CITY; Mo. business came lo an abrupt stop today as a shapely blonde took a sun- bath on the lawn of the Mis-fcompton, and asked police to Twin boys, found wander- ing along crowded downtown sidewalks Tuesday and "un- claimed" for almost 24 hours, were identified this afternoon by their stepfather as Larry' and Garry Welsh of 495 Morningside Dr., juvenile au- thorities reported. According to Juvenile De- parlmenl Inspector Ivan B. Eaton, stepfather, James Costello, 21, made telephonic identification of the twins after police located him at his job with Ihe South- ern California Gas Co. in Tfte Southland's Finest Nwspaptr LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST Vol. IM PRICE 10 CENTS 52 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 UK 2-6859 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) souri Highway Commissionjaid in the search for his wife, grounds. Miss Lavelle Strowburg, 25, of Blockton, Iowa, said she was innocent of any attempt COSTELLO told officers the boys, 2y2 years old, left to" draw attention and scarediwitn tneir mother Monday "or Oceanside, where Mrs. when she was told of the havoc she had wrought. Across the street in the 14-story State Building every window was spectators. jammed with THE SPOT Lavelle chose for her sunbath was just be- low the office windows of Rex M. Whitton, Missouri's chief highway engineer. He joined dozens of his staff in gating, too. Lavelle said she just want- ed to take a sunbath and someone told her to go ahead. So she donned her bathing and strolled over to the highway building lawn. She sat on the grass, loosened the straps of her black and white; one-piece suit and doped her long legs and arms with sun- tan lotion. THEN SHE spread her cape on the grass and stretchec Costello said she had a job as a waitress. Mrs. Costello, ie said, had been under psy chiatric care and suffered rom amnesia attacks. This is her third disappearance in the 3ast few weeks, he told po- ce. The woman, officers said was traced to a hotel at 134 850 Fighters Ring Fire in Cap Pass SAN BERNARDINO fire, blazing out of con- :rol in rugged Cajon Pass, las now seared acres. Firemen say they hope to lave it controlled by dark, however. More than 850 fire fighters had cut fire trails and laid backfires around most of the fire's perimeter this morning. The fire started Tuesday afternoon two miles west of the junction of U. S. Highway 66-91 and State Highway 138. It is about 50 miles northeast of Los Angeles. Fire officials said it probably was of hu man origin. THE FIRE CREWS, aided by 45 trucks, 12 bulldozers and 10 planes, staved off a "she'and thethrfat Tuesday to several children spent Monday night. Vickie, 20, who disappeared with the boys Monday. Ike to Invite Nikita to See Arms Bases Especially Wants Russia's Premier to View U.S. Homes GETTYSBURG, Pa. UP) President Eisenhower said to- day that Soviet Premier Ni kita S. Khrushchev is being invited to see some military installations during his visit to the United States if he wishes. The Soviet leader will be given a wide range of choice on the kind of installations open to him, the Presidenl told a news conference. If he does not want to see any establishments, that's OK with Eisenhower too. Khrushchev told a Moscow news conference lastWednes day if he is invited to see an American military installa tion "I would not co." He added he would go to Amer-i ca as a peaceful man andj would not have any rocket] sticking out of his On Tuesday, shortly before the boys were found wander- ing in downtown Long Beach, she applied, to the County Bureau of Public Assistance for aid, declaring she and the children were not being sup- ported by her husband. COSTELLO, who said he placed a younger child. Doug- las, in a licensed boarding home when his wife failed to arrive home, told police he has a court order awarding all the children, including the twins, to him. He is sched- out, all 5 feet 10 inches of uled lo claim the children her, shading her eyes with her arms. Lavelle she came here; with her father who is trying! to sell the state an invention! to keep mowing machines from clogging. later this afternoon at the Juvenile Bureau. A NEW TWIST TO LABOR-MAN AGE MEM BILLS Reps. William Ayres left, and Phil Landrum (D-Ga) gag it up in Washington Tuesday with torn strips of paper representing the many amend- menls proposed to labor-management control bills being considered by Ihe House. Both Ayres and Landrum are members of House Labor Committee. Spray 'Rebel' Mob Before Central High Crowd Marches After'Peace'Plea by Gov. Faubus LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Police clubbed segregationists today in a short, violent bat- tle over integration of Little Rock's public high schools. The violence came after a rally on the capitol lawn where only a few minutes be- fore Gov. Orval E. Faubus had old some segregation- sis to avoid trouble. Some 200 segregationists jegan their march on Central High School soon after the rally broke up. It was at Cen- tral that mob violence erupt- ed over integration in 1957. 4 POUCE RUSHED from Hall High School, where three Ne- groes had been integrated this morning without incident. Police Chief Gene Smith and 20 policemen met the flag-waving, chanting men, women and children at an in- tersection near Central, scheduled to be opened to in- tegration at 1 p.m. with Negro. Smith ordered the crowd to disperse. The crowd jerred and some yelled: "You cowards." ranches in the Stone Basin rea. Residents were evacuatec iemporarily from about 10 homes in the northern fire area on the north slopes of the San Bernardino Moun- tains. The homes were being saved. No serious injuries have been reported. Here was the fire situation elsewhere in California: Nearly 20 forest and brush fires were burning but most were under control. More than fire fighters were on the lines, Bucket brigades and house- (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) DISCUSSING the unprece- dented Khrushchev visit be- ginning in mid-September, Eisenhower said he intends to tell the Soviet leader that LI. S. bases abroad are pure- ly defensive and threaten no ne. He also plans, Eisenhower said, to ask why Khrushchev does not permit the progress in improvement of East-West relations which Eisenhower considers necessary for a summit conference. Eisenhower said he is most anxious for Khrushchev to see the fine, small, modest homes in which Americans live, in- cluding those in such spe- cific places as the Levittown development and the com- munity around the Fairless steel plant in Pennsylvania. THE PRESIDENT did not specify which Levittown and some of his audience took him to mean the one on Long Island, which would provide two widely separated exam- ples. Press Secretary James C. Hagerty said >ater, how- ever that Eisenhower was talking about the Levittown 11 Winners Chosen in Numbers Game SixLyrone persons have collected in the Press-Telegram's Lucky Numbers Game. A 19-year-old Girl Scout camp counselor from Long Beach, Ruth Ammann, 2709 E. 220th St., won this week. Eleven more lucky Social Security numbers are listed in today's paper. To enter the contest, write or print your name, address and Social Security number on a postcard and mail it to The Independent, Press-Tele- Pine Ave., Long RUTH AMMANN Winner near the Fairless plant. Eisenhower said in fact he! would like to take Khrush-j chev on a flying trip around 1 Killed, 5 Injured as Bridge Falls Tight Vote Seen for Labor Bill WASHINGTON (fft- A group of Democrats pushed today the argument that House passage of a labor con- trol bill backed by President Eisenhower might kill chances of any labor legislation this gram, 604 Beach 12. If your number is selectee as a winner, bring Social Se curity card and identification to The I, P-T business office before the stipulated deadline Today's lucky numbers are (deadline, Friday, Aug. 14 5 530-20-9079 (S50) 709-16-3579 720-07-0295 481-01-3189 570-03-5655 573-30-6980 564-10-8670 558-58-9585 553-14-9815 481-24-5094 200-22-2276 Tuesday's UiCKy numbers are (deadline, Thursday, Aug. They sought to support that argument.by producing a let- ter from Robert F. Kennedy, chief counsel of the senate rackets committee. The let- ter to Rep. Lee Metcalf (D- Mont) repeated the argument already voiced by Kennedy's brother, Sen. John F. Ken- nedy author of a senate-passed bill on the sub- ject. While the House argued the respective merits of three 'dif faring bills on the subject, backers of each worked to line nn support in advance of POLICE BEGAN swinging billy clubs. Six of the segre- galionisls, all men, were pushed into a patrol wagon. The marchers had been chanting "2-4-6-8, we don't want to integrate." It was one of the battle cries segregationists had use'd in 1957. Integration was en- forced at Central that year by federal troops but last fall Fabus closed all high schools to stop integration. Smith warned the crowd to break up before he ordered his police task force into ac- tion. He called on firemen, too, to spray the crowd with water from a truck which had been parked at an inter- section. 4 THE MARCHERS were led by a sound truck, playing 'Dixie." Heading the parade were five men marching abreast and carrying Ameri- can and Confederate flags. The scuffle lasted six or eight minutes. The worst was over in four minutes. The street was cleared but small groups reformed on the side- walk. Smith did not have the fire hose turned on the crowd un- til after the arrest of the six men. (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) "I'm giving you this one the voting, expected to start chance to get out of the (Continued Page A-4, Col. Washington D.C, in his LOS ANGELES (CNS) One man was killed and five M 1959, 5 pm) Khrushchev could see the fine homes which have developed (Continued Page A-6, Col. 3) 100 MILES FOR JAYWALKER 1 Killed, 2 Injured When Jets Collide COTULLA, Tex. One airman was killed and two injured when two jet trainer planes collided in flight about 25. miles southeast of here. Both planes were from La- redo, Tex., Air Force Base. Base authorities identified the dead man as 2nd Lt. Jacob B'. Yawger of Wichita, Kan. San Francisco Fire Destroys 12 Houses SAN FRANCISCO MV Flames swept through 12 old frame houses .in Ihe 1400 block of O'Farrell St. Tues- 'day night. Fire Chief William Murray estimated damage at around THEY'LL BITE THE PAY DIRT-AT LAST California's Indians Wait for Wampum From Washington SACRAMENTO California's In- dians today looked forward to a windfall of wampum from the white men in Wash- ington. It could be up to apiece for each of Indians in the state. It probably won't be that much. The Indian Claims Commission in Washington announced Tuesday that the California tribesmen are entitled to un- specified compensation for about three- fourths of the land in California. "I imagine there will be some bar- becues and picnics to said Reginald Foster, city attorney of Pacific Grove who was counsel for the largest group of Indians in the 12-year suit. "We've Foster said. "We're in like Flynn. All we've got to do now is fill in Ihe He hoped lhat could be done by com- promise within six months, possibly in time for Congress to appropriate the money early next year. Foster wouldn't reveal what the Indian compromise offer will be. He noted that they got S1.25 an acre in 1944 for about acres they never got from the white men under unratified treaties. The current case, which involves 65 to 75 million acres, could amount to around 90 million dollars to be divided equally among the descendants "of the Indian resi- dents of California in 1852. Foster indicated his compromise offer might cut the figure by a third. That would be 60 million dollars or about for each Indian. However, in Ihe 1944 award the gov- ment deducted about two-thirds as money advanced for support. others injured shortly before loon today when a bridge icar General Hospital col- lapsed without warning. All five men were working on top of the partially com- peted bridge on Charlotte St. near Soto St. when it gave way. The dead man, not imme- diately identified, was cut out of the fallen debris by fire- men using acetylene torches. Workers who suffered minor injuries were identified! as: 560-46-1829 526-05-7148 283-24-2090 561-10-0949 560-40-6882 045-12-0054 554-26-7385 563-24-3477 568-16-7234 504-22-6284 562-14-8350 WHERE TO FIND IT Last list of names in "For- jgotlcn Fortune" tax heirs Earl Cox, 50; Henry appears on B-9. 33; Benjamin Villareal, 27; i and Mario Arqojo, 44. Another worker, tentatively identified as Poss Basted, 57, was rushed to General Hos- pital. The exact extent of his juries was not immediately known. Weather- Low clouds late to- night and early Thurs- day, but mostly sunny Thursday. Maximum temperature by noon to- day: 75. Beach B-I. Hal A-25. A-25. C-5 to II. B-10, 11. A-28. Death B-2. A-24. B-3. Shipping B-S. C-l, 2, 3, 4. A-26. Tides, TV, C-l2. A-25. B-4, 5, 6, 7. Your A-2. Finds Arm of Law Long but Judge Chivalrous Chivalry came to the res- cue of Mrs. Vivian Jose- phine Vincent in court to- day after the long arm of Long Beach law reached 100 miles to arrest the 65- year-old widow in her Beaumont home. Her crime? Mrs. Vincent is a jaywalker. She was jailed here short- ly after midnight on a war- rant charging her with fail- ure to appear in answer to a jaywalking citation is- sued four weeks ago. Ironically, it was an act that Mrs. Vincent mistook for chivalry which caused all her trouble in the first place, shev told Municipal Court Judge Lyrrian B. Sut- ler this morning. "I THOUGHT the police- man was escorting me Across the she said. seemed real nice until we got to the curb and then he gave me the ticket." Mrs. Vincent said the of- ficer who issued the cita- (Continued Page A-6, Col. 2) VIVIAN VINCENT Sentence Suspended   

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