Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 11, 1959, Long Beach, California                             UKIAH SAVES SELF IN FOREST FIRE BOY SAVED FROM CAVE-IN Billy Curtis, 4, is lifted by fireman William Devine (left) and Fire Lt. Donald Cook from a water ditch that caved in on him in Des Indians Prove Claim to 75% of California! DIGS OUT CAVE-IN VICTIM WASHINGTON 1 The Indian Claims Commission has ruled California Indians are! entitled to compensation for. 70 to 75 million acres of land in the state. This is about three-fourths of the stale. The exact amount of land taken from the Indians by the government in 1851 and the value of the land at that time will determined in a later proceeding before the com- mission. IN AN ORDER dated July 31, the commission ruled that about individual In- dians enrolled; as Indians of California have proved their claim to original ownership of all of the land area of Cali- fornia except areas claimed in other proceedings by specific Indian tribes. Excluded also from liability for compensation are lands granted to private ownership by the Spanish and Mexican governments prior to the ac- quisition of California by the United States in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848, and the acres estab- lished by the United States government crvations. for Indian res- THE COMMISSION said the original Indian ownership was extinguished by the gov- (Conlinueel Page A-6, Col. 2) Dad Saves Buried Son Bare-Handed DES MOINES, Iowa desperate father dug frantically with his bare hands for almost an hou Monday to free his 4-year-old son, trapped when water ditch caved in on him. Labor Bill Battle on in House WASHINGTON l publican southern A Re- Democrat coalition formally launched a drive in the House today for inactment of an administra- tion-backed labor bill branded as "tough" by union leaders. Opening four days of debate before a packed House and galleries crowded with repre- sentatives of unions and in- dustry, Rep. Howard W. Smith (D-Va.) attacked a rival measure backed by Democratic leaders. Smith, chairman of the Rules Committee, is support- ing a measure endorsed by President Eisenhower a n c most House Republicans: It would, he said, put an end to racketeering and other evils disclosed by the McClellan Rackets Committee in the Senate. The bny was complete] juried, arid "screaming som hing the father, Ir Curtis, said later. When th icreams stopped, tension ros 'He must be gone, he couldn lave lasted that said quietly. But'finally Curtis, with th iclp of other rescuers, go oung Billy H vas taken to- a hospita vhere an examination showe IE had only a few bumps an muses. 62 Peronist Unions Go on 1-Day Strike BUENOS AIRES two unions led by followers of ex-dictator Juan D. Peron went on a 24-hour strike to- day in a demonstration of sup- port for striking sugar work- ers in Tucuman province. An attempt to promote a nationwide walkout by all workers failed when 19 pro- Communist unions and 32 democratic labor groups ignored the strike call. THE VIRGINIAN said the Democratic supported meas ure approved by the House Labor Committee would not curb abuses. Voting is not scheduled un- til late Wednesday or Thurs- day. Speaker Sam Rayburn who is supporting the committee bill, said the House will hold a Saturday session if necessary to com- plete action on the bill this week. In advance of the House session GOP leaders predicted to Eisenhower that the bill the President backs will pass in the house. Bomber Flight on 1 Engine HONOLULU Navy Neptune patrol bomber limped miles Monday on one engine and landed safely at Hilo after a seven-hour strug- gle to stay aloft. The big two-engined 'plane, out of'Whiclby Island, Wash., and on a flight from Alameda, Calif., to Barbers Point Naval Air Station here with 10 men aboard, reported it had !ost an engine as it passed the halfway point of no return on the flight. The pilot, Lt. (j.g.) Braden R. Briggs, found one engine too weak to keep his craft steady at feet, so he used his auxiliary jets to boost, himself up. But his plane kept losing altitude anc his jet fuel ran out. By the time he was still 400 miles out he was cruising at 250 feel, riding the cushion of ai above the water. A naval spokesman said the last 40 miles was at the 100 foot level. He landed at Hilo on the big island of Hawaii as three rescue planes escortct him in. The threw everything, including the! parachutes, during Ihelr mile touch-and-go flight, crew told how they overboard almos youngsters, vlen, Women Battle Blaze Blame Children, Hunters; Elsinore Flames Controlled By Associated Press. Ominous smoke hung pvci orthern California moun- ains today as firemen fough ew flames in forests near kiah and Willits, about IOC miles north of San Francisco Every able-bodied man in kiah had to turn out Mon ay to save the city of 15, 00. Women and childrei sed garden hoses and buck ts to wet roofs as wind wept embers -cascaded down rom flaming forests just be ond city limits. Flames leveled one build ig on the outskirts and dam ged five others. Frightenec nimals, some singed, ven ured onto Ukiah streets. A ranger said fires nea Ukiah had been set by clil ren and hunters. 3 A FORCE OF 500 me inged the Decker Canyo laze near Lake Elsinore i Southern California, after i :laimed two lives, injured 2 .tid burned acres. With the fire finally sur ounded by breaks, fores anger Truman Holland said 'the overall situation look encouraging." For five weeks blazes i inder dry California fores and brush land have kcp firemen on the run. Tl state got less rain and sno .han usual last winer an heavy rains are not due fo months. As Northern Californ flames licked wider, forestc said children and matche proved a devastating comb nation. RANGERS SAID two fire on. ,Cow Mountain, ..east (Continued Page A-6, Col. 2 The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 1959 ol. 163 PRICK 10 CENTS 3Z PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED Hi! 2-593D HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) How Flames Swept Onto Ukiah THREE BOYS were playin nside the six-foot-deep ditc near Billy's home when suddenly caved in. Billy older brother, Donald, 9, wa juried chest deep, and neighbor, Marvin Connett, was buried up to his neck. Donald managed to free limself, and ran for his 'ather, who was just pulling lis car into the driveway. "I ran over and started Curtis said later. 'My wife called the police and fire departments. The Connett boy had his head out, but he was moaning "I'm ?oing to die, I'm going to die." "THE DIRT was pretty tight around his chest and said Curtis, and the was having trouble areathing. Later the boy was treated for possible chest in- juries. Curtis freed the Connet boy iust .as help arrived, and quickly began digging for his son. He tried to dig an air lole, while helpers shoveled away the dirt around the Employment Hits Record 67.5 Million WASHINGTON U. S. employment climbed to a record in Juiy, the Labor Department report- ed today. Unemployment during the month declined to persons, a smaller than nor- mal drop. The employment figure was up from June while the unemployment figure was down by THE FIGURES did not fleet the steel strike which has idled workers in steel mills, iron ore mines, and Great Lakes carriers and related industries. The report said weekly earnings of factory workers declined to during July, but still were 56.59 higher than a year ago. ONE OF SEVERAL FIRES burns over hills in vicinity of Ukiah in Northern California Monday, threatening (he town as burning embers fell on many houses. The town was later declared out of danger. At the lower left is Ukiah airport and to the right of it is a drive-in Wirephoto.) Cash Paid 58 Contest Winners A total of has been FAR EAST STORM VICTIMS P.G. 4 on U. S, Navy Ship Rejected Killed by Huge Wave on Trinity YOKOSUKA, Japan seas generated WASHINGTON Tha given to 58 lucky Typhoon Ellen caused the death of four sailors subcom- winners since Monday, Aug.j Hie U.S. Navy's attack transport Bexar, the Navy tod A a today. The Navy said 3, in The Press Telegram's! Secretary P. Mitchell of Labor James hailed the new Finally Patrolman Edmund Lee got hold of Billy's hand. 'It was a weird ;aid Lee later, 'The boy hold of my hand real Light and wouldn't let go." Then the boy's screams stopped. The father kept dig- ging fiercely, and a few min- utes later, after more than 45 minutes of frantic work, the boy was lifted to safety. Lucky Numbers Game. This leaves to be; i given away in prizes as the: contesl week. Rlevcn more lucky Social; Security numbers are listed in today's paper. TO ENTER THE contest, write or print your name, ad- dress and Social Security number on a postcard and mail it to The Independent, Stocks Edge Up After Deep Plunge NEW YORK stock market made a modest recov- ery today after Monday's deep plunge. Pivotal stocks in the steel, motor, chemical, oil and elec- tronic groups forged ahead. In early afternoon, however, the iposal for private power devel- of the Trinity Recla- foot-long Dexar was en route' JQn project in to Okinawa Sunday when a subcommUlce huge wave broke tQ bow, washing two men pacific Gas CQ board and knocking seven WHERE TO FIND IT Unclaimed tax funds await dozens more listed on Page A-7. Beach Hal B-7, B-7. D-2 to 7. C-6, 7. A-8. B-6. B-3, Shipping D-2. C-l to 4. C-5. TV, D-8. B-7. B-4, 5. Your A-2. l employment and wage figures as meaning that "more Amer- icans have better jobs at higher wages than ever be- fore." C 9 TOGETHER, he said, they mean that the economy "is ising to new heights and is (reducing more and better hings for a higher living standard for all of us." Seymour Wolfbein, the de- partment's job expert, said the report reflected "con- :inued basic improvement in the employment situation." He said a reduction in the ranks of unemployed is expected in August, but that these calculations might be upset because of layoffs in- duced by the steel strike. The government counts strikers as but workers who are laid off as a result of a strike arc tallied as jobless. Press Telegram, 604 Ave., Long Beach 12. N.Y. Records Quake Probably in Indies NEW YORK slight earthquake miles from here, probably in the West Indies, was recorded early to day on the Fordham Univer- sity seismograph. If your number appears in the list below, bring your So- cial Security card and identi- fication to The I, P-T business office to claim your award. Today's lucky numbers are {deadline, Thursday, Aug. 13, 1959, 5 560-46-1829 528-05-7148 283-24-2090 561-10-0949 560-40-6882 045-12-0054 554-28-7385 563-24-3477 568-16-7234 504-22-6284 562-14-8350 Monday's lucky numbers (deadline, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 1059, 5 557-54-1816 555-46-3120 565-48-2684 558-40-5790 572-22-5890 468-18-6356 550-34-2404 556-14-6375 355-26-1819 496-22-1719 (55) 549-09-0481 pjne some gains had been cut and a few issues had slipped un- der the previous close. At noon the Dow-Jones in- dustrial average stood at 654.79, up 1.00. That com- pared with a loss of 14.78 Monday. Some new buying entered the market today from those who felt prices had reached attractive levels, brokers said. They believed the re bound was primarily a tech- nical rally. Another crewman rescued jnc of the two men over- joard, then was drowned limself. The other man over- ioard was not found. fc O i 4 A PROBE into the tragedy vas opened at sea aboard the carrier Lexington by a board headed by Rear Adm. W. [-.Ipower features in the current Gentner, commander of Car-ifiscal year, rier Division 7. Ens. Robert D. Stannus, of U.S. Tanker Goes Aground Off India BOMBAY, India (ff) The National Peace was reported abandoned today off the Lac- cadive Islands after going aground. A message received here gave no other details except the ship's position, 200 miles off India's west coast. Weather- Some clouds late to- night and early Wednes- day, but mostly sunny Wednesday. Little change in temperature. 'thers against the anchor to build a ...v. Thc acljon vindlass and a bulwark. Two f the latter died of their in- (hc effcct of legis- Conferees representing House and Senate Appropria- tions committees are meeting later today to decide whether to retain a appro- priation for starting federal construction of the Trinity, All-federal development >an Antonio, Tex., was was in 1935' 'heroic officer who vol- ified by the Navy as the Congress at that time direct- ed the secretary of interior to investigate the possibility of contracting with a non-federal .mtarily dove into heavy seas" and saved Marine Cpl. (Continued Page A-6. Col. 1) agency for the power features. Long's Solons Cut Him Short, Adjourn BATON ROUGE, La. Frustrated Gov. Earl K. Long today planned, to "carry my fight to the people" after a December Democratic guber- natorial primary. The governor had little or nothjng to say to newsmen rebellious legislature killed his after he. shuffled from .the special session before-it was nn .hour old. Long, trying to gather his forces after a stunning and swift .defeat, had his sights set on a downtown New Or- leans rally grounds of his political foe, Mayor deLesseps Morrison, one of his opponents in the legislature ashen faced, be- hind him the echoes of law- makers applauding their ad- journment victory. 9 -3 BUT HIS CRONIES brushed aside the sudden end.as an act of defiance. They, con- (Continued Page A-6, ij   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication