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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 5, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 5, 1959, Long Beach, California                             BARE HOFFA MILLION 'MOB' DEAL WIFE LOSES MATE IN A JIFFY Miles, Nary a Hitch- Then 2 Cars Hit Freeway! Union Health Funds Used, Probers Say Teamsters Pay Off Underworld Debt, Senators Assert HOME The SoMtJitaufs Bvtnmg Newspaper The LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1959 Vol. 158 PRICE 10 CENTS 48 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-11 SI CLASSIFIED HE 2-6V31 EDITION (Six Editions MRS. DOROTHY MEAD TELLS officers how she successfully followed her hus- band's car all the way from New York to Los Angeles. Then she and the chil- dren lost track-of his car on a freeway. He was located 40 miles driving. From left are Officer W. G. Gazetta, holding couple's twins, Kath- ryn and Christian, 14 months; Mrs. Mead; Bruce, 8, and Officer R. C. Baker. 11 Collect Winnings for Lucky Numbers LOS ANGELES WPI For miles, from New York to Los Angeles, Dorothy Mead had been following her hus- band's car with nary a hitch. But she lost him on the sprawling Los Angeles She told officers: Her husband, Army Capt. Eleven winners claimed in The Press- Telegram Lucky Num- bers Game. The in the first listing of Social S e c u ri ty couple's sons. Mrs. Mead was numbers went to Erling Jameslfollowing in a sedan with Eshelman'another son and two daugh WASHINGTON The Senate Rackets Committee charged'.today that James R. Hoffa paid a long-standing debt to the' Chicago under- world with three million dol- lars of Teamsters Union health and welfare funds. The committee, in a report to the Senate, said that Team- ster president Hoffa person- ally swung the deals to please the underworld and benefit the family of Paul Dorfman. It -said Dorfman is the man who introduced Hoffa to 'midwest mob society." In Chicago, members of the Dorfman family, not available for comment. i THE COMMITTEE said mid west Teamsters Union mem bers paid dearly for the deals since 1950, in drastic reduc tion of health-welfare insur ance benefits and inflated charges for the insurance. The committee also filed two other reports with the Senate on its 1958 investiga- tions, alleging: 1. That the brothers JMax and Louis Block, who since have resigned as offi- cials of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, "milked the treasuries" ol Resort Area fire Kills 1, Hurts 7 Chester R. Mead, was driving a small car with one of the two New York locals. The re- said they got n salaries three MRS. ERLING BARUM Husband Won Barum, of 24819 Ave., Lomita, and a prize! was awarded to Mrs. Ruth G. Timmerman, of 11 Bolsa Ave., Seal Beach.' t THE CONTEST will en'd when has been claimed by holders of the lucky Social Security numbers listed Monday through Satur- day in this newspaper. To enter the Lucky Num- Game just write or prinl your name, address and Social Security number on a post- card and mail it to Socialise curity Numbers, Independent, Press-Telegram, 604 Pine Ave., Long Beach 12. t TODAY'S LUCKY num een .transferred Germany. ers. The couple was heading or San Francisco. Mead hat there from and expenses in and DONT YOU think we hpuld get a map? Mrs. Mead uggested before they reached he freeway. "Just follow her hus- and replied. When they reached a clover- eaf interchange, Mrs. Mead >ecame confused by the wel- er of signs. Then she realized Ver husband's car was miss- ng. She got off the freeway and police. An all-point years manipulated another out of the locals' treasuries! for other purposes. I 2. That the A. P. Stores' eastern division "participated in an elaborate conspiracy" with Max Block to force 000 A. P. employes into his union under a 45-hour work: week contract instead of the 40-hour week rival unions de- manded. THE THREE REPORTS fol- lowed one filed by the com- mittee Tuesday charging that "Hoffa will destroy the de- cent labor movement in this THREE FIREMEN play hose on raging forest fire as it nearer] one of 15 homes on Summit Valley Rd: in San Bernardino Mountains Tuesday. The flames were turned back 20 feet from the house. Firemen said the blaze, which started two miles north of Creslline, would be controlled by tonight. (AP Photo) notified bulletin (Continued Page A-4, Col. 6) was issued for her RUTH TIMMERMAN Winner of Seize Dope With Haul 'King' Huge bers are: (Deadline Friday Aug. 7 at 5 p.m.) 442-09-3980 524-12-7273 232-01-7878 249-36-3130 495-03-0901 5C2-284203 5) S) 273-03-4785 5) 541-26-1434 5) 523-14-3122 5) Tuesday's lucky numbers are: (Deadline Thursday, Aug. 6 5 p.m.) 200-09-297S 562-07-9848 562-07-6408 549-12-4772 543-32-7587 515-20-4394 5) 553-52-9654 5) 359-26-2M5 5) 565-52-7116 5) 472-14-9897 5) If your Social Security number appears in The Press uisband. DENIED CAR HE WAS FOUND late Tues- day night at Castaic, 40 miles northeast of Los Angeles.- Police gave Mrs. Mead care- ful directions to Castaic. Then, as a. safety measure, they es- corted her past the puzzling cloverleaf. So Father, 18, Kills Himself CRESTLINE battling Southern California's worst fire of 1959 began to gain the upper hand today but at a cost of one fatality and seven injuries. Leo Zunie, 50, a U.S. Forest Service firefighter from Zuni, N.M., died of a heart attack while hacking out a fireline on the fire's fiercest front. Not far away, six other In- ian firefighters were trapped y a flareup later Tuesday ight. All were burned. Most the injuries were not be- eved to be serious. An inmate from a San ernardino County road camp rew was hit by a boulde islodged from the ridgi bove him when fire burned ;LOS ANGELES "Mastermind" of all narcotic in Southern California OK to Mueller iy Senate Group WASHINGTON (R> The enate Commerce Committee xlay unanimously approved rederick H. Mueller's nomi- ation to be secretary of com- post left open by IB Senate's rejection of ewis L. Strauss. Mueller's nomination, sub- itted by President Eisen ower on July 21, now goes the Senate, for confirma- nngs arrested by narcotic officers today with nearly half million dollars worth of narcotics in his possession, police said. He was identified as Louis Padilla, 36, of.417 Island Ave., Wilmington. said ex- convict was the importer and wholesaler for all the big narcotic rings in this area. He was arrested after more than a year of investigatior in which 12 narcotic squad officers had, posed as users. The huge haul of narcotics included heroin, marijuana and various types of stimulat- ing pi 111. Arrested with Padilla wu Bemlce Waterman, 45, whose connection with the case was not Immediately revealed. Telegram, bring your Socia Security card and idenlifica tion to the business of fice at 604 Pine Ave. am claim your prize. WHERE TO FIND IT More names of persons en titled to income-tax refund checks are listed on Page A-20 Beach Page B-l. Hal Page A-23. Page A-23. Pages II. Pages C-6 to 12, Crossword Page A-8. Death Page B-2. Editorial-Pace A-2Z Page B-J. Shipping Tage C-6. C-l to 5. C4. TV, Patent Page A-23. Your Page A-2, on. SAN ANTONIO, Tex. WP> An 18-year-old boy, father of a 7-month-old son, ap- parently shot himself to death Tuesday because his own father wouldn't let him buy a car. Antonio Hinojosa was found shot between the eyes when his father, Dolores Hinojosa, broke down the bathroom door in the family home after hear- ing a shot. A .22-caliber rifle lay near the body. Celestino Hinojosa, 23, brother of the dead youth, said Antonio wanted to buy an auto, but wasn't old enough to sign ownership papers. His father, Celestino said, refused to sign for the youth because he felt it was too great a responsibility; HE'LL 'TALK PEACE' No Saber Rattling on Visits, K Vows MOSCOW Premier Nikita S. Khrush- chev declared today in a new conference that he want- ed to talk peace wilh President Eisenhower "without way brush around it. His leg pparehtly was fractured. DESPITE THE injuries, fire- any saber rattling." Khrushchev told news cor- respondents in a conference asting an hour and a half that the talks with President Eisenhower were not intended j to replace a summit confer- ence but as a prelude to it. He said his visit would af- ford an opportunity for talks negotiations. men steadily gained on fire during night. Authorities said the the the >laze is now 70 per cent con- ained and probably will be controlled by late tonight. It was started Sunday two miles northwest of Crestline jy an arsonist, said Elwood Stone, Forest Service fire investigator. The only section out of con- trol now is on the west side of the fire, in the Pilot Rock Ridge area, where Zunie died Seventeen hundred men from U.S., state, county and city fire agencies are now battling the blaze. An additional 500-man fire HE GAVE NO precise dates for the exchange of visits. He probably will go to the United States in mid-September, he said, and President Eisenhow- er will come here later in the autumn. Some 300 correspondents crowded into the high-domed Sverdlov Hall in the Kremlin to question the Soviet Pre- mier, who began the confer- zone ce with a brief statement. "If these two powers estab- ih good he said, f they cooperate for peace, ere will be lasting peace on arth." He said he saw real oppor- inities for Soviet-American ilations to be based on peace nd friendship. Nixon Back From Red Zone Visit WASHINGTON President Richard M. Nixon', big jetliner brought him bad (Continued Page A-4, Col. 3) GUESS HE DIDNT LIKE ME' Boy, 5, Beaten and Burned; Jail Highland Park Couple HIGHLAND PARK say a 5-year-old boy has been "beaten repeated- ly with a belt buckle, burned with lighted cigarettes, bitten, kicked, punched and half-starved." The boy's stepfather, Robert Losa, 28, a machinist, and his mother Mrs. Mary Losa, were -arrested on child-beating charges Tuesday. The Ronnie Arciaga, was taken to a hospital. Police said Losa admitted that when he was drunk he beat the child and Mrs. Losa said.the boy waz beaten because he "was not Ixxiscbroken." TJie boy .said of his stepfather: "He'd play a game with lion game. He said, 'I'm a lion. You're a piece of meat.' He would bite me on the legs, the chest, the arms and sometimes the tummy. "He would beat me when I wet my pants. Once when I did he put my feet in hot water and the skin fell off and stuck to the bedclothes. "Once when he came home from the night bar he woke me up and burned me' with a cigarette in different places. Some times he-would.beat me wilh his belt buckle and other-times he would whip me with the belt. "A couple of weeks ago he threw me against, the mail box when I wet my pants." "1 guess he just doesn't like me.." to Washington today from two-week tour behind the' Iron Curtain. On hand to greet Nixon was a crowd estimated by airport police at Among the welcomers foreign affairs specialists, government officials and po- litical figures. The GOP national chair- man, Sen. Thruston Morton of Kentucky, was there wilh other political figures. Ike Will Air Plea for Stiff Labor Laws Demos Demanding Equal Time for TV-Radio Reply WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower decided to- day to take to the nation a plea for what he called effecr live labor reform legislation. The White House announced he will speak on major radio and TV networks at p.m. Thursday p.m. Long The move plunged- the President into the midst of a roaring congressional contra- iversy, and brought a s.wi.ft Iflareback from some Demo- of what legislation is best- in that field. Among the Democratic re- action was talk of demands for equal time from the 'net- works to reply to the Presi- dent. "THERE ARE no territorial EIGHT BUSLOADS of "Bull IN THE SENATE. Demo- Elephants -an association isputes between ountries, nor any our two insoluble ontradictions, nor any issues hich could prevent the stablishment of a climate of Continued Page A-5, Col. 3) ing: "All America is proud of Dick and Pat." State Department officials had a sign of their own which was hoisted in the crowd. It OIL ROAD PAYS Former Finds New Source of Income VERSAILLES, Ind. Earl Hayden has found a new source of in- come. Motorists trying to avoid .a bridge construction proj- ect started'cutting through Hayden's bam lot and gar- den. Hayden, after getting nowhere trying to stop them, started charging a 50-cent toll. The drivers inv mediately complained te- state police, but were told the Hayden toll road was perfectly legal, was written in Russian. Translated, it said: "Con gratulations on the success of your trip." Douglas Dillon, acting sec retary of state, headed the official welcoming group. But the first greeting to the vice president and Mrs Nixon was from their dauph ters, Patricia, 13, and Julie 10. As soon as Nixon steppec onto the ramp leading dowr from the big craft, one of th youngsters rushed up to em brace him. wise to leave the ongress. "I hope the President has lought through all the impli- ation of this Joh'n- on said. "There are very..few eople who do riot want an Weather- Low clouds late to- night and early Than day, but mostly sunny Thursday. Little change in temperature. Continued Page A-4, R1VATE ROOM Author Enjoying Self in Quarantine. NEW YORK author Patrick Dennis is in quarantine on Stalen Island, but he says he's enjoying himself. He forgot to get vaccinated before going abroad. And when he ;re- turned Monday from Russia. the gpveinment sent him to the U.S. Public Health Serv- ice Hospital on the' island for a two-week stay, to If he comes down with smallpox. "It's very pleasant he said. "Private room, fine food, good reslful J   

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