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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 4, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 4, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Nixon at Massacre Site, Pleads Against Prejudice FOREST BLAZE RACES TOARD RESORT AREA Fwwwl Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1959 Vol. LXXII-No. 157 PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HES-USI 34 PAGES jffi) CLASSIFIED HE HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) PATRICIA NIXON, wife of the vice president, offers one of the flowers from her bouquet to an infant near the school she visited outside Warsaw, Poland. Others are Wirep hoto via radio from London) 11 Winning Numbers Listed-You on It? more winners in The Press-Telegram's Lucky Numbers Game are listed in today's This brings the total number of winning Social Honolulu, Hilo Face icane HONOLULU hurri- cane packing winds of 130 m.iles chujned steadily westward across the mid-Pacific today, threaten in'g- a sidelong blow at the Hawaiian Islands. .This morning the storm was miles southeast of Hilo, major city on the Island of Hawaii. Weather Bureau pre- dicted the hurricane would Security numbers to 22. The first list Was- an- nounced Monday morning. Deadline for claiming to- day's prizes is Thursday al 5 p.m. t r IF YOUR Social Security number appears in The Press Telegram, bring your Socia Security card and identifica tion to The I, P-T busines office at 604 Pine Ave. am claim your prize. To enter the contest, whicl will end when ha been given away, print o write your name, address an Social Security number on postcard and mail it to Socia Security Numbers, Indepenc ent, Press-Telegram, 604 Pin Ave., Long Beach 12. Today's lucky numbers are move to within 160 miles of by early Wednesday, then veer to the northwest, coming to within 75 miles solith of Honolulu early Thursday. HURRICANE trackers call the storm Dot. If Dot maintains the pre- dicted course Honolulu will be hit by whole gale winds of.57 miles an hour. ,fhe Weather Bureau or- dered whole gale warnings into effect for the Island of Hawaii, biggest and most southerly of the Hawaiian chain. Meanwhile, farther west, Okinawa braced tonight for a hard blow from Typhoon El- len, churning directly toward the U. S. military island with this U. S. military island with winds up to 135 miles an hour. "-.The U. S. Air Force flew moSt of its' planes to Japan and the Philippines. [Deadline Thursday, Aug. 6 5 p.m.) 200-09-2979 549-1W2SO 562-07-9848 562-07-6408 549-12-4772 543-32-7587 515-20-4394 5) 553-52-9654 5) 359-26-2045 5) 5) 472-14-9897 5) Monday's lucky number (Deadline Wednesday, Aug. 5 p.m.) 567-42-6599 489-20-1262 571-36-2490 480-38-9526 558-12-9281 450-56-7715 512-03-1503 5) 458-14-5276 5) 5) 50445-1496 5) 325-10-4513 S) By JOHN SCALI WARSAW Pres lent Richard M. Nixon visit- d the site of mass executions uring World War II today, len made a plea for the end f racial prejudice as he cod on the spot of War- Nikita Slated to Arrive in U.S. Sept. 15 Expected to Make U.N. Appearance; Ike to Paris Soon WASHINGTON now appears that Nikita S Khrushchev will begin' his momentous visit to the Unitec States on Sept. 15. State Department officials said today it is safe to assume the Soviet premier will arrive here that day. They said the> could not officially confirm that date, however, since th final word has to come from Khrushchev himself. Where Khrushchev, land in the United States de pends on the type of airplan he will use, officials said. It. is expected in any cas that the will come, directly t Washington. INFORMANTS said tha since Khrushchev is an off cial guest' of the Unitec aw's destroyed Jewish states, his visit to Washing ton would by all means pre cede an eventual appearanc elsewhere, such as the Unitec hetto. He coupled his pleas with e warning there must never e another war because cities uch as Warsaw would be estroyed. Standing before the re- mains of a bombed-out build- ng where Jews fought in heir last bunker to resist the almost indescribable suf- ering of the Jewish people n.'Poland and other coun- Nixon said: 'As we move into what we lope will be a period of peace and of good will, whatever visit. >e our economic or social A FIRE-FIGHTING PLANE at right centerseems to be brushing over the.top of a tree as it .water-bofate in lifiller: Canyon. (AP) Nations General Assembly i New York. This does not rule out the possibility that the Russian leader may address the Gen- eral Assembly after his Wash- ngton visit. President Eisenhower men- tioned only September in an- nouncing Monday that Khrushchev would come here, and that later in the fall he would return the Russian's Sen. Wife Dies in Washington WASHINGTON (M Mrs. NVilliam Langer, wife of Sen. Langer (R-ND) died today after a long illness. She was 68.' philosophies, we must all mite to fight against preju- dice and racial hatred be cause here is what happens when such passions are re- eased." 4 EARLIER HE went to Pal- miry Forest, where he wreath on the site of graves of Poles slaughtered in Nazi mass executions early in World War II. He laid a special wreath on the grave of Janusz Kuso- cinsk, Poland's winner in the I.os Angeles Olympic Games in 1932. The track star was one of the most noted victims buried at the spot about 13 miles north of Warsaw. Among others who died there, American officials said, were Parliament Speakef Maciej Rataj and Mieczyslaw Niedzialkowski, Socialist Party leader and editor. The vice president was the 'irsf foreign dignitary to visit the site. IN HIS STATEMENT on the (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) IN ANY EVENT the Khrushchev Eisenhower ex- change of .vis its raises U. S.- Soviet diplomacy to the sum- mit level, whether or not it results in' a formal summit conference on a broader scale. His exchange of visits with Krushchev and an earlier trip to Europe to confer with heads of the major western allies will give Eisenhower direct contacts with the par- ticipants in any later summit meeting. A GENERALLY favorable reaction, both in this country and elsewhere in the world, greeted Monday's announce- Greyhound Plans Station WHERE TO FIND IT Governors meeting in Puer- to Rico turn attention from daughter. W. Europe Hails Ike, K Visits LONDON West Europeans today cheered the impending exchange of visits by President Eisenhower anc oviet Premier Khrgshchev as near miraculous melting in ie cold-war ice. The general enthusiasm 'as tempered in some capi- als by a fear that the two uper-powers would work out settlement in which the esser nations had no voice, isenhower's pre-Khrushchev our. of the major West Euro- jean capitals was designed to ssure the Allies. One West German news- aper warned the meetings be "pregnant with dan- er" for Germany; and an FIRMS ALSO HIT ment that Khrushchev has ac- cepted Eisenhower's invita- tion to visit the United States next month. Many expressed hope that East-West tensions would be eased if Krushchev were im- pressed first-hand with the nation's strength and peace- ful intentions. Talks with Eisenhower and a 10-day tour of the nation are among the plans for th Khrushchev v i s i Reports from Moscow said the Rus sian premier 'Is expected to bring along his anc .The senator was with her When death came at a.m. Mrs. Langer was. operated -for a i condition in her chest on April 7, 1958, by pr. Brian Blades at George Washington. Uiriverrity Hog- She returned to -her hope here for. a time after the operation but WM :Uken back to hospital two months ago, domestic politics to Khrushch Western Greyhound Lines ev's coming visit to America. today asked the City Council to approve plans for a 000 bus terminal on Long Beach Blvd. between 1st St. and Broadway. A spokesman for'the! company said the firm has options to purchase the property. He said the company's board of directors within the next 10 days and wanted an expression of city desires before it goes aheac with the purchase of land The Council referred tfie mat ter to the city manager for a report. Story on Page A-2. Beach B-l. Hal A-7. A-7. D-2 to 7. aV4, 7. D-l A-6. B-J. SWppbY D-i C-l to S. With most details still un (Continued Page A-4, Col. 4) TV, M. A-7. Women Paid B-4, 9. Yoor A-J. UC Records Quake, Probably in Nevada BERKELEY Fairl; strong earthquake was re corded today by Univer sity of California seismograp' probably centere in western said Dr Don .Tocher, seismologist. The quake began record in at a.m. and hstwi minutes. Tocher epicenter was 240 miles from Berkeley and preliminary studies pointed toward sparsely settled area of wes ,ern Nevada. L B. Medical Assn. Blasts Phone Fees ByBENZINSER Long Beach's medical society Nears Cabins Above i Apple Valley 2nd Finger of Fire Approaches Rugged Deep Creek Canyon CRESTL1NK stub- born mountain fire gained new vigor during the night and today approached what one veteran fireman called "the roughest territory known to man." Jim Johnson of the State Division of Forestry was re- ferring to rocky Deep Creek Canyon. Another finger of the blaze was racing toward a heavily populated desert re- sort area. Of Deep Creek Canyon, Johnson said: "This is where the Lord dumped all the rocks he had left over when he finished building the world." THE FIRE is burning north through the San Bernardino Mountains toward the foot- hills where the Mojave Des- ert meets the mountain slopes. It is now six miles from cabins in the hills above des- ert communities of Hesperia and Apple Valley. The mountain community of Cedar Springs is only two miles from the flames. Civil Defense pumper trucks from 10 cities in I.os Angeles and Orange counties were rushed to the town to join eight al- ready on guard there. t MORE THAN 10 square miles of watershed and tim- ber, acres, have been consumed by the fire since it started Sunday two miles north of here. "Only about 20 per-cent of the fire is now said a U. S. Forest Service fire boss, Tom Neff. "The acreage tripled last night in a few hours." In rugged Miller Canyon fire crews were forced to flee for their lives, abandoning hoselines. The flames, de- stroyed feet of hose. today criticized doctors who charge patients for telephone queries. But at the same time several members of the Long Beach District of the Los Angeles County Medical Assn. said any doctor is within his rights to charge for phone consultations. The association also took a verbal whack at certain in- surance companies, saying some of them are attempting to avoid payment of medical claims. FEDERAL, stale and coun- ty firemen saved a dozen homes threatened during the night. So far there have been (Continued Page A-4, Col. 3) alian newspaper expressed ear the two powers might carve up" spheres of influ- nce. The conservative ,'Aurore of Paris regretted hat the negotiations would pass over Europe's head." But the West German gov- rnment officially welcomed tie exchange of visits. Poet. Family Held 8 Mrs. by Escapees ANAMOSA, Iowa   Famed Iowa poet Paul F.ngle and his family were held at knifepoint for eight hours in their summer home by two men's reformatory escapees late Monday. Engle, 50, his wife, and their daughters, Sara, 14, and Mary Evelyn, 18, were not harmed, although they were bound with plastic-covered wire before the prisoners fled in Engle's station wagon. THE LOCAL association, which has a membership of about 520 medical doctors, sued a formal statement >day in the wake of an up- oar caused by a news release om the American Medical ssn. AMA headquarters in Chi- ago said some the nation's lysicians have been charg- ig for each patient's tele- hone call. The AMA said it rowns on the practice as on a new bill by to SOVIET NEWSPAPER plashed across their front ages .the announcement o he' Khrushchev Eisenhower 'isils. Moscow Radio said ini m English language broad- :asl: "May the visits melt the ce of the cold war and pave he way to stable peace and nternational cooperation." Diplomatic observers in the Soviet capital cautioned, lowever, that there was still lard bargaining ahead to >ring any results in such major issues as Germany and disarmament. AUTHORITIES SAID Don old Sills, 25, and Larry Mor- rison, 21, both of Des Moines walked away from prison farm No. 1 northwest of here Monday afternoon and made their way to the nearby Stone City home of Engle. The family was tied to chairs and sofas by the two men before they left the house about 11 p.m. The fugitives avoided a roadblock nine miles west o here, and abandoned the car Sills was captured. Morrison stole another ca and fled. Weather- Low. clouds late to- night arid early Wednes- day, but mostly sunny Wednesday afternoon. Little change in tempera- ture. Maximum by noon today: 77. Quake Awakens Fresno Residents FRESNO W An earth quake, awakened residents o the Fresno area at a.m today. No damage was re- ported. The Weather Bureau sai its barometer began to swa al the time the tremor was felt. Solons Bar Effort to Kill Housing Veto WASHINGTON Tha Senate Housing subcommit- tee today voted 5-4 against trying to override President Eisenhower's housing bill veto. It then set out to write new legislation. Sen. John Sparkman (D- the subcommittee chair- man, said he was confident the new bill would be close to the one that the President rejected. The group hoped to finish s that of charging patients or filling out medical insur- nce forms. A local spokesman said lat "a query of a substan- al number of Long Beach hysicians has failed to reveal ny one who makes it a prac ice to charge patients for elephone calls." 4 THE STATEMENT added "The doctors interviewee .11 felt they wanted to en courage their regular patients .0 feel free to call them at my time they believe there s justifiable cause." One Long Beach doctoi (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) LOST PERT. L A. Hydrant Stolen Off Street LOS ANGELES The Los' Angeles Fire De- partment today was search- ing for some missing prop- 'erty: a fire hydrant. The hydrant apparently 'was stolen after being 'knocked, over by an auto. ght. The three Republicans on he subcommittee and two 'emocrats, Sparkman and en. J. William Fulbright (D- joined to defeat a mo- on by Sen. Paul H. Douglas 3-1II) that a recommenda- ion be made to override the eto. Douglas was backed by tiree other Democrats. Once this decision was tah- n, the subcommittee settled .own in what both sides said .vas an amicable spirit to vote on what should bp put into a compromise measure. Herter to Leave Geneva Thursday GENEVA of State Christian A. Herter jlans to leave Geneva at 9 j.m. Thursday for his return :rip to the United States, The foreign ministers' confer- ence is scheduled to end here Wednesday.- Herter. is to fly home in the same special jet which brought him here for the sec- ond half ot the Geneva con- ference nearly four weeks ago.   

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