Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: August 3, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Press Telegram

Location: Long Beach, California

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - August 3, 1959, Long Beach, California                             'MR. K' TO VISIT U. S. IN SEPTEMBER; IKE WILL TRAVEL TO RUSSIA IN Battling Six The Finest Evtning LONG BEACH 12, MONDAY, AUGUST Vol. 156 PRICE 19 CENTS Lake Gregory Blaze Scorches 800 Acres, Still Uncontrolled SAN FRANCISCO UP) Thousands of firefighters, watchful for rattlesnakes fought today to contain big fires in California. "Federal Forest Service spokesmen said all appearec to be man-set. Most violent of the blazes was one or two nearing Yo Semite -National Park. It erupted Saturday near the town of Briceburg and by late Sunday night had burned more than acres of tim- ber. Although the tourist- jammed park was not men- aced and traffic continued in and out, the fire licked to within miles of the park boundary despite the. efforts of 600 men and seven aerial tankers. "AND WE'VE got a new hazard up said ranger Richard Johnson. "The men there are lots of rat- tlesrtakes and they have to work .carefully." Sottie 400 men battled the six-day-old Nelson Cove fire nearby. It had burned acres along county line. saw 32 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Earthquake Shakes Two Dixie States of grass and timber the Madera-Mariposa no hope of (Continued Page A-4, Col. 4) Buildings Rock in 200-Mi. Area of Georgia, S. Carolina Bv the AHoclaterf Press An earthquake shook parts of Georgia and South Caro- lina early today. No injuries or serious dam age were reported. The seismograph at Wes- ton College in Massachusetts recorded an earthquake of strong intensity at a.m (CST) miles southwest of Boston, placing it in the South Carolina-Georgia area The tremor was felt from :olumbia, S. C. to Brunswick, Ga., 200 miles south of the South Carolina capital. A state policeman at Co- lumbia, Otis Hillyer, said he was awakened when the po- lice building shook. He said he thought there were two tremors a few seconds apart. ton Rocky Due Nov. FLOWERY WELCOME FOR NIXON Two women run to present flowers to Vice President Nixon who stands in auto during Warsaw welcome Sunday. He was met by cheering, singing Press Wirephoto.) By ROBERT E. LEE Press-Telegram Washinglon Bureau JUAN, Puerto G.oyJ.CNelson A. Rockefeller ofT.'Niw York has set a Nov. iTtarget date for his decision to challenge Vice President Richard M. Nixon the Republican presiden- tial" nomination. Rockefeller has at least drawn even with Nixon in in We public opinion polls by then, it can be said on re- liable authority, the New YJorker will throw his hat ihtir, the ring. If he trails Nixon only slightly in the fall all indications are that he'l! make the race anyway. plans be came evident as an over whelming majority of othe: governors, gathered here fo their annual conference, madi it clear they think Nixon al ready has the GOP nomina tion locked up. -This was the prevailing view among seasoned politica .warhorses of both parties Nixon's apparent political tri umph in Russia has impelle many governors, includin several Democrats who Ion have taken a dim view (Continued Page A-4, Col. 2 TWO TREMORS also were reported at Augusta, Ga., where a home was shaken and beds rattled. At Savan- nah, Ga., about 120 miles southeast of Augusta, the quake was felt only slightly in downtown office buildings ut distinctly in r ural ections, A rumble that sounded like n explosion was reported at Charleston, S. C., and within 50-mile radius of the coast- 1 city. The Weather Bureau aid a' building in Charleston hook for several minutes. Hilda Mauldin, a telephone iperator at Orangeburg, S. C., aid she felt "a tremendous olt from some external orce" but no damage was ound at the telephone build- ng. THE SEISMOGRAPH direc- or at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, Charles Mercer, said he would have reading later. He said the earthquake-re- cording device has indicated about 24 tremors in the Co- umbia area during the past 18 months, but the discern- ible last tremor was in No- vember 1952. Other points which felt to- day's disturbance included VVaycross, Ga., and Aiken, Newberry and Beaufort, S.'C. Rescue 2 on Glacier for 7 Days JUNEAU, Alaska UPl A single smoke flare, saved for use just at the right moment, brought rescue Sunday to two men marooned seven nights and days on the high barren face of an Alaska glacier. The flare was sighted by a helicopter pilot participating n a week-old sea and air search over the mountains and through the valleys and nlets of rugged Glacier Bay Rout Tijuana Crowe TIJUANA Bullets were fired by soldiers and police to disperse an election day crowd Sunday night and a child, a block away, was gravely wounded. Meets 'olish Boss jomulka Conference Lasts 3 Hours; Great Welcome Given WARSAW Pres ent Richard M. Nixon me or more than three hours to ay with Communist chie Vladyslaw G o m u 1 k a and 'remier Jozef Cyraniewicz. Irowds continued to cheer lim at every turn. About enthusiastic >oles gathered to watch "Jixon place a red, white and blue tinted rose wreath at! Soviet President Going Abroad to Allied Talks in August WASHINGTON UP) President Eisenhower and loviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev .will exchange isits this fall thus taking into a new phase of diplomacy the East West differences on which world icace hangs. Khrushchev's visit here a historic first by a top eader of Russian communism will be in September. Eisenhower will go to Moscow later in the year. Exact dates for the visits have not yet been fixed. (In Warsaw, Vice President Richard M. Nixon said he inderstood Khrushchev vould go to the United States about Sept. 15.) Almost identical announce- ments of the plans were made here and in Moscow the differences apparently only those of translation. Seek Quick Recess in Big 4 Talks agreed today to seek a recess of the deadlocked Big Four talks on Germany until aftei the Eisenhower meetings. Western diplomats were confident any risk of a new move against Berlin the tomb of the Unknown] was out of the question unfi Soldier in a solemn ceremonyj the exchange of visits had EISENHOWER called a honoring Poland's war dead.rT news conference to takcn P'ace and Probably un- make thc announcement here. Winding up on the 'peace GENEVA West theme, the final paragraph, in the text released by Moscow, said: "Both governments ex- press the hope that the forth- coming visits will promote the establishment of better understanding between the United States and the U. S. S. R. and will further thc cause of peace." Many in the crowd cheered him with cries of "Live 100 a traditional cheer in Poland. An excited Polish worker, shouting "Vive bolted through police lines and grabbed Nixon in a fierce bear hug, him down. almost knocking after an East-West sum- mit meeting that generally was expected to follow. As a result, the western foreign ministers decided 10 call for an indefinite recess when the nine-week-old Ge- PQtlSH SECURITY agents pried Nixon loose and pushed man roughly aside. Nixon was startled nomentarily but quickly regained his com- posure. The vice president's aids said the man meant no (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) neva meeting winds up Wednesday evening. Secretary of State Chris-j third National Monument. Although the two saved, the body of a man remained with the wreckage of a helicopter in which they crashed a week ago Sunday at the level Oilman glacier. c DEAD WAS Robert Bald- win of Ridgefield, Conn., geophysicist for the Newmont Exploration Co., Ltd., of New York City. Another helicopter was to remove the body to day. Weather- Night and morning low clouds. Slightly cooler. Noon tempera- ture: 80. Bearded and weary, bruisec jut otherwise not. seriously lurt, were Robert Sheldon anc Melvin Guenera. Sheldon, a geologist from Spokane, Wash., was working with Baldwin at an oil explor ation camp on Brady Glacie in the National Monumen area. Guerrera, 28, formerly of Reno, Nev., is a pilot fo Petroleum Helicopters of La fayetete, La., working on charter. The crowd, estimated at bout by authorities, lad gathered as members of Action Party protesting re- been removed by troops. Prof. Zeferino Sanchez Hi- he National PAN) were rertcd removal of ballot boxes from voting places by soldiers. A .22 caliber bullet, be- ieved fired by an auxiliary policeman, ricocheted hit Fierro Salicido, 3, in the lead as she rode with her "amily in an automobile. Her condition was critical. Re- that two other persons lad been wounded provec alse. LEADERS of the PAN par ty, whose candidates were seeking to gain control o1 Baja California state and four city governments, chargec that 94 ballot boxes from 28 of Tijuana's 106 precincts, had dalgo, mayor PAN candidate of Tijuana, was Exchanges at this meeting with reporters developed also: 1. Before the meting with Khrushchev here, Eisenhower will go to Europe'later this month to confer with British Prime Minister Harold Mac- millan, French President (Continued Page A-4, Col. 5) tian A. Herter and the Brit- ish, French and West Ger many foreign ministers met this morning to discuss ways to end the Geneva meeting. forj rested by federal police on a technical charge of disturbing the peace a half hour before the polls closed. News of the arrest swept through the city and Hidalgo's followers flocked to their headquarters in the downtown district. SOLDIERS marched into the crowd with their bayonets at the ready. The crowd dis- persed, but quickly reformed and had to be broken up again. A Los Angeles newspaper correspondent, Brad Williams, reported that 100 members of the National Action Party had been arrested by mid- night. Stock Mart Up Toward Record High NEW YORK stock market romped toward an- other record high in busy trading today. Motor and oil shares paced the upswing which put key s s u e s ahead fractions to above a point. Steels, rubbers, selected chemicals and some nonfer- rous metals also ran up smartly. Most rails and util- ities edged higher. A continuing flow of rosy first half corporate earnings reports together with various brokerage house recommenda- tions contributed to the mar- ket's bullish tone. WHERE TO FIND IT Warsaw welcome to Nix- on an American triumph, Walter Ridder reports Page A-2. on Beach B-l. Hal B-7. B-7. D-2 to 7. C-4. B-2. B-6. B-S. Shipping C-5. C-l, 2, 3. C-4. Tides, D-l. TV, D-8. Vital D-2. B-7. B-4, 5. Your A-2. CASH AWARDS START VIOLATOR OF TRADITION PENALIZED Palace Guard Kicks Onlooker -LONDON A scarlet- coated Buckingham Palace the last word in British military confined to today. A woman tourist, com- plained he kicked her while "executing' a smart "patrol outside the palace gates Sunday night. "'.POLICE DECLINED to the woman or the member of the elite .Cold- stream Guards. One British naming no names, said the woman tourist is an American. As always, tourists crammed the broad side- walk in front of the palace Sunday night to point and exclaim at the guards. As always, the guards- men in their tall, black bearskin hats straight ahead, never chang- ing expression as tourists posed beside them for pic- tures. Then something went wrong with tradition. As one off-duty guardsmen told It today: 1 The guard snapped to at- tention and slammed his rifle butt on the the signal .that he was go- ing to march off. The guard may have thought the woman .was teasing him. "AS HE MARCHED off on patrol in front of the palace accidental- ly bumped into the woman.- She got very annoyed. But the guard was a bit shocked too, you know." .Thfe tourist complained to police, who forwarded the complaint to thc Coldstream Guard headquarters. VICTIM Of MEXICAN TROOPS' GUNFIRE A nurse at Miguel Aleman Hospital in Tijuana examines the wounds of Rosa Fierro Salcido, 3, hit by gunfire from troops during election Photo.] Dixie Loses, Solons Scan Rights Bill WASHINGTON By a 10-5 vote, the Senate Judici- ary Committee overrode southern opposition today and took a civil rights bill up :or consideration. The committee overrode ob- jections from Chairman James O. Eastland (D-Miss) and other southern opponents. They had blocked attempts at two previous meetings to get the legislation up for action. The bill called up, previous- ly approved by a 4-3 vote in subcommittee, is limited to extending the life of the Civil Rights Commission and to re- quiring the preservation of voting records for use in in- vestigations by the attorney general into alleged denial of voting rights. 1st Lucky Numbers; Is Yours on List? First 11 winners in The Press-Telegram's ucky Numbers Game are announced in today's paper. Today's publication of win- ing Social Security numbers egins a continuing list of ucky numbers that will ter- minate when has been iven away. Eleven lucky numbers are isted below and eleven will ie chosen daily except Sat urday and Sunday. THE FIRST NUMBER listed each of the five days is worth to the owner; the next wo numbers listed, each he jiext three numbers, each; the next five numbers >5 each. Deadline for claiming to day's prizes is Wednesday at 5 p.m. If your Social Securit; number appears in the paper bring your Social Securit; card and identification to The Independent, Press-Telegram business office at 604 Pin Ave. and claim your aware TO ENTER thc contest rint or write your name, ad- ress and Social Security lumber on a and- nail it to Social Security- lumbers, Independent, Press- "elegram, 604 Pine Beach 12. Your card will remain 'in he drawing unless itj.w'ins, n which case it will.be with- drawn from .future awards. All. prizes must be'claimed >y 5 p.m., two days after pub- ication, or if your number appears on Friday, by S p.m. the following Monday. Today's are: winning S67-42-4599 4S9-20-12C2 571-34-24M 558-12-B281 450-54-771J (515) 5) 353-03-MM (t I) 504-05-14M (9 5) 325-1M513 5)   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication