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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: July 25, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 25, 1959, Long Beach, California                             MISS JAPAN WINS U TITLE ,A LONE HECKLER Russians Cheer Nixon at Own Exhibition MOSCOW President Richard M. Nixon visited the Soviet agricultural and industrial exhibition today and got a warm reception, except for a lone heckier... Nixon appeared at the show up.as a rival attraction of.the U. S. meeting with first deputy, premiers Anastas I. Mikoyan and Froi R. Kozlov. About visitors were at the agricultural show when Norway 2nd, i.r I ir i Galif.-USA 'Kidnaped' N. J. Socialite in. Missing Jewelry, Bruises Still a Mystery in Hoax sey. socialite Jacqueline Gay Hart, her tale of a cross-coun- try kidnaping an admitted hoax, went into hiding today. The blonde, 21-year-old beauty confessed late Friday she made up the dramatic de- tails of her abduction from a Newark, N.J., airport and the forced auto ride to Chicago's Lakefront Grant Park. She then went into seclu- sion, leaving unanswered many key questions', includ- -4How did she travel unno- ticed from Newark to Chi- cago? happened to her diamond engagement ring and a gold pin she was wearing when she disap- peared? did she get bruises arm and a swollen lip? 4t-Why did she make up the kiclnap story? THE TRIM society girl's confession was revealed by her' father, wealthy Short Hills, N.J., businessman Ralph A. Hart, in a surprise news conference at FBf headquar ters here. Hart flew here early Friday with his daughter's fiance, Stanley Gaines, 25, and Games' brother, F.bersole, after police telephoned him that his daughter was safe. The haggard father told newsmen he believed his daughter apparently .suffered a recurrence of a two-year- olcj amnesia attack moments after kissing her fiance good- by. at the Newark airport. "It appears that this might be another1 recurrence from Ker 1957 automobile accident with the same kind of imagi- they saw Nixon and his party. They began applauding vigorously. It was the same sort of reception Nixon re- ceived after his speech open- ng the U.S. exhibition Fri day. Nixon got out of the Hm busine at the Agricultura Hall and began shaking hands with as many Russians as he could reach. Everyone was friendly until he reached the exhibition hall of the Uzbek Republic. ONE SPECTATOR cried ou that charges the Soviet Union had enslaved other nation; were a western provocation. Nixon listened attentativel; and told the man: "I'm'in fa vor of free speech and I.am glad you were able to talk." The Vice President hai luncheon with Vladimir Mat skevich, minister of agricu! lure, and they toasts for peace and frienc ship. But Matskevtch (Continued Page A-3, Col. 7 Oriental Suffered Traffic Tragedy Two Ago By LOU J6BST An briental beauty, who ought her way back from the rink of tragedy, was se- ected Miss Universe of 1960 lere Friday night. Miss Japan, Akiko Kojima, 12-year-old Tokyo fashion model, is the first contestant rom her nation to win the most coveted beauty title in he world. Runner-up is.the ash-blond Miss Norway, Jorunn Kris- iansen, native ol Third is Terry Lynn Huntingdon, Miss United States, from Mount Shasta, LONG BEXCH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY PAGES PRICE CENTS Vol. TELEPHONE RES-Ilfl CLASSIFIED HE HOME .EDITION (Six Editions Miss Universe Homesick, Tired, but 'on Cloud, Having a Dream' FOURTH IS Miss England Pamela Anne of Vlorden, Surrey. Fifth is Miss Brazil, Vera Ribeiro, 19, "ol Rio de. Janeiro. The new Miss Universe, who two years ago was hos- pitalized after ah automobile accident and knocked out of Miss Universe competition then, is one of three children living with her widowed mother. She is a statuesque 5 feet 6 inches tall, weighs '120 pounds and measures 37-23- (Continued Page A-3, Col. 7) Networks Hit Snag on K-Nixon TV Tape NEW YORK television networks a snagr today in- plans .tape recording-of Friday's hot verbal'texchange in Moscow between Vice President Richard M. Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev. nary dreams that Hart said. tit she had MISS HART was the object (Continued Page A-3, Col. 8} Navy Chief Resigns in Argentina BUENOS AIRES, Argentina1 President Arturo Fron- dizi today accepted the resig- nation of his secretary of the navy, who quit when three major navai bases announced they would refuse to obey his orders. A communique said Gen. Elbio Anaya, secretary of war, would serve as acting secretary of the navy in place of Vice Adm. Adolfo Estevez. The navy thus won a vic- tory over Frondizi as had the army in a similar move last month. Both services com plained Frondizi's government contained too many old back- ers of ousted dictator Juan D. Peron. WHERE TO FIND IT A-4, 4. Pages R-2 to A-2. Death A-lt. B-2. Shipping A-It. A4, 7, A-2. TMet, TV, A-11 Fast Truce on Berlin British Aim GENEVA (UPI) Britain has decided to push for a quick Berlin truce agreement and an East-West summit meeting in September despite American and French cool ness to the latest Soviet m a n e u v s, authoritative sources said today. Foreign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd, in London this week- end for talks with Prime Minister Harold Macmillan has launched a campaign with this clear-cut objective, the sources said. Britain was sale to feel that even the mos limited Berlin truce woulc justify a summit meeting. AT THE SAME time Russia has discreetly informed the West it still wants a summi conference and prefers hold ing one at an early date. The information dispelled earlie communist reports the Krem lin had cooled toward such a meeting. The' Geneva falks them selves were in weekend col storage. Secretary of Stat Christian A. Herter flew t West Berlin for a one-da; visit. Lloyd was in London French Foreign M i n i s t e Maurice Couve de.Murvill and West German Foreig Minister Heinrich von Bren tano were in Brussels for meeting of the six nations o "Little Europe." Herter promised West Be liners today the West wi never accept Soviet deac ine for withdrawing it, troops from the divided city The next scheduled Genev get-together is set for Mon day. President at Form for Pa. (UP President Eisenhowi planned to play a round golf this moping during h leisurely weekend away fror Washington's m i d s u m m e hem. Confusion ensued after the etworks were told to hold p until a copy of the tape ould be sent to Russia for simultaneous' airing on t television.'That could take day or two. The situation became even lore puzzling after a round f phone calls between the etworks, the State Depart ent in' Washington and merican officials and news en in Moscow. AT FIRST the belief was lat Nixon had issued the rder. However, CBS and BC reporters in Russia necked and found both lixon and his aides sur- rised to hear the report. CBS said its correspondent, 'au! Nivcn, spoke to Nixon irectly and the Vice Presi lent advised him 'he had greed to the plan but did ot originate it; Niven quoted as saying it was a State Department order. CBS reporter Sam A. Jetfe hen checked with the State )epartrhent in Washington Hurricane Slams Texas r Gulf Cities Thousands Flee Tides; Freepori Damage Million GALVESTON, Tex.'OB Hurricane Debra smashed against Texas coast cities to- day with winds up to JOO miles an hour. Torrential raini and six-foot tides flooded low areas and sent thousands of persons scurrying to higher ground, The small but vicious hurri- cane, which developed sud- denly in the Gulf of Mexico Friday hurled sev- eral small fishing vessels against jetties as 15-foot waves lashed the seacoast. One seaman was injured. Hun- dreds of other small craft sought shelter as hunricane warnings were hoisted over a wide sector of the .Texas coast. Damage in the Freeport area was estimated at one million dollars by Police Chief Barney Priest today. The lurricane damage was wide- spread but at many points (Continued Page A-3, Col. 4) MISS UNIVERSE, JAPAN'S AKIKO KOJIMA, perches her straw bonnet atop 4-fool-high Miss U trophy In her Lafayette Hotel room early this morning. "I'm on a the 22-year-old Tokyo beauty said, adding, "I wonder if this beautiful trophy will ever Photo by John Neagle) and said he was that the Jepartment had not origin' ted the order but merely elayed instructions from of- icials in Moscow. CBS and NBC concluded t was the work of the American Embassy in Mos JAFFE SAID the State De- >artment was cabling Moscow n effort to get everything straightened out. In the meantime, no one lad any idea when the 16- minute color tape might shown American television audiences. CBS, NBC and ABC orig- inally were -to have aired it starting at noon today. Philip Gundy, .vice presi- dent of the Airpex Corp., video tape equipment manu- was present when the Nixon Khrishchev ex- change took place. He told GBS that Khrushchev asked for a full copy of the ttpe, and that his be given full English translation for American viewers. To this Nixon agreed. But, Gundy, at no time did Khrushchev ask for a si- multaneous release in Russia and the United States. Libel Suit Ordered by Hotta WASHINGTON (AP) A spokesman for James R. Hof- fa says the Teamsters Union president plans libel action against Robert F. Kennedy for remarks the S.enate Rack- ets Committee counsel made about Hoffa on television. Kennedy made several charges against Hoffa Wed- nesday night when he ap- peared on the- NBC Jack Paar Show. The spokesman said Hoffa had instructed his attorney to prepare Jibel action against the network, Kennedy, Paar and others who sponsored or were associated with the show. Kennedy said he would By BEN ZINSER Miss Universe turned down breakfast in bed this morning. When the tray arrived In her Lafayette Hotel room, 22- year-old Akiko .Kojima of Tokyo exclaimed: "What? Eat breakfast with- out gelling up and washing my face and putting on make- Later, however, the first Driental girl ever lo win the Miss'U title agreed to pose with the tray In bed. The news photographers insisted. THEY ALSO insisted that [he four-fool Miss U trophy placed beside her. She blinked her eyes sleep ly at it, "Wonder if It will ever] she: mused aloud (n Japanese. It was 4 a.m. today when Miss Japan went lo bed, and the girl from the land of the rising sun didn't want to rise with it today. But she was up by a.m. and shortly afterward beauty operator Chickie Ku< saba began to work on Miss Kojima's long black hair. ATTIRED IN white negligee with yellow print, Miss Uni (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1) Miss U Not So Special, Japan Beauty Judge Says TOKYO spokesman for the newspaper Sankei Shimbun said today, "We had expected the crowning of Miss Akiko Kojima of Japan welcome the suit "so (hat (he as Miss. Universe." But matter of whether Mr. Hoffa has betrayed the union mem bership can be proven-in ajoutcome. Japan's chief contest judge said he was surprised al the court of law." Fear 3 Navy Airmail in Crash QUONSET POINT, R- L Cfi Quonset Navy air- men were presumed detd to- day after their plane crashed on take-off from the carrier Valley Forge off Virginia Thursday nighL The newspaper spokesman added, "Our paper has sponsored the past Miss Japan matching Miss Kojima chief of the panel of Judges who selected Miss Kojima as vliss Japan'last month, said "I am surprised indeed rrankly speaking, I did no expect her to place hlghei han fifth, certainly not first n my aesthetic eyes, she i not particularly a breath-tak ng beauty." added, 'Then are many many-beauties in Japan contests and we were positive Miss Kojima out shone all the misses Japan chosen during the past eral years." "Sankei has sponsored the She won this year's Miss Japan contest by a very margin." Mrs. 'HIsake Kojima mother o'. the nearest Mis. Universe, Mid, "I feel at If U.S. Protest in Jet Attack WASHINGTON rited States has charged lat a Communist jet attack n a Navy patrol plane last lonlh amounted lo "at- empted murder over the igh seas." Ah official U.S. protest was odgcd with the North Korean nd Chinese Communist vol- nleer army Friday night. The rotest was relayed to the lommunists by the United 'ations Command at a spe- ial meeting of the Armistice Commission in Panmunjom 
                            

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