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Press Telegram: Thursday, July 23, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 23, 1959, Long Beach, California                             CAUFORNIAN WINS MISS USA GROWN RULES MAY INTERVENE Scottish Lassie Makes Belated Bid For Miss U Enters Race for Universe 'itle Tonight Brunette, 19, Beats Out Four BloVides in American Finals By HERB'SFIANNON California's own Terry ynn Huntingdon today was cclaimed Miss United States America of 1960. The 19-year-old UCLA ance student was the judges' loice Wednesday night to ompete with 33 foreign eaiities for the title of Miss niverse. The first elirnina- ons for the title are sched- .ed tonight. Brunette Miss California ethroned Arlene liowell, the ofmer Miss Louisiana and rtiss USA.of last year's pag- as the judging panel's ecision was announced to a heering throng of per- ons in Municipal Auditorium. MISS HOWELL and Byron 'aimer, master 'of ceremonies, ransferred the crown of "imerican beauties to the new ueen of domestic loveliness mation was Miss Carelgean Douglas, A COUPLE OF CUTE KITTENS Alice Jones Poses With Pet, Lady Byron First Steel Talks Due Monday NEW YORK mediators have arranged the first joint peace talks in the nine-day-old steel next Monday. But Joseph F. strike for Finnegan, head of the Federal Mediation Service, repeated that he sees no early or easy solution to the strike which has. idled more than half a million steel workers. Meanwhile, the three' top aluminum companies Wednes- By MARY NEISWENDER Attempts to enter a red haired Edinburgh lass as Mis Scotland in the Miss Univers Pageant was launched toda; by the Royal Order of Scol tish. Clans. And their entry, 18-year-ol' Alice Elizabeth Jones, is i Long Beach and ready fo competition, the clan's chiel tain said. The clansmen, headed b Hiram McTivish of Los An geles, royal head of the group which includes Scots frort (throughout the United State and Canada, said they wer disturbed because their horm land was not represented i the international beauty con test. day rejected Steelworkers the of United America wage demands and lined up with the steel industry stand. The Steelworkers' contract with the aluminuhi companies expires July 31. Finnegan plans to meet to- day with Secretary of Labor James P. ington. Mitchell in Wash- Mitchell is acting as a fact- finder for ho wer. President Eisen IN A TELEG R AM di patched to pageant produce Oscar Meinhardt, McTivis asked for "particulars on th possibility of acquiring th franchise for a belated Sco tish entry in the Miss Un verse Pageant." their candidate, the tel gram said, was already Long Beach. Born and educated in Edii burgh, the green-eyed, woulc be contestant, who measure a trim 35-23-35, has been Long Beach with her mothe studying for an entertai ment career, McTivish said. "She has won many beaut (Continued Page A-3, Col. House Unit Adopts Watered Labor Bill WASHINGTON UP) The House Labor Committee, by a narrow 16-14 vote, today formally approved a compro- mise labor control bill. Committee Democrats split down the middle 10-10. Six of the 10 Republicans voted for the -bill, which was a watered-down version of the measure passed by the Sen- att earlier this session. Republicans immediately served notice tliey will fight to strengthen the committee bill drastically when reaches the House door. it Rep. Joseph Holt (R-Cali told reporters (hat "all R publicans who voted for th bill did so only to get a bi on the floor." Rep. William H. Ayres (R Ohio) said "not one Rcpub' can who' voted for this b will vote for it on the flrx unless it is amended by th House." The bill as approved is th product- of five weeks o acrimonious bill-drafting ses sions. seems please nobody. LONG BEACH 12, CAUF., THURSDAY, JULY YejLXXII-N.. 147 f K, 0 E 1 C EN TS PAGES CLASSIFIED HE HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Frigid Khrushchev Blast Greets Nixon in Moscow Ease Berlin DemandU.S. Tells Russia Herter Insists Grorriyko Drop Key Proposals GENEVA of State Christian A. Herter told Foreign. Minister Andrei Additional Miss Universe stories and pictures on pages A-2, A-3, A-6, A-9, A-10, A-17, B-l and B-4. mid tears, of happiness from oth girls. Second in the judges' esti BIDS FIANCE GOODBYE, THEN VANISHES Find No Trace of Missing Socialite; Fear Foul Play Texas, 20, of Corpus Moments be- ore the announcement of her uccession to the throne, California had congratulated Carelgean' in the belief that he was the winner. In third place was Miss 'lorida, Nanita Greene, 21, of !oral Gables. Fourth Was Vllss Georgia, Dorothy Gladys >ylor, 18, of Valdosta. Fifth ilace went to Miss New York, Arlene Neshitt, 21, of Mine- ila. Long Island. 4 THE NEW Miss USA, who came from Mount Shasta to epresent California, was the only brunette among the five inalists. All the others are )londes: Terry has green eyes, s 5 feet inches tall, veighs 120 pounds and meas- ures 36-23-36. High lights of the evening's judging in evening gowns and jathing suits were brief talks >y the 15 semifinalisls com peting for the Miss USA title, The file of 34 cohtenders 'or the top honor in the Miss Jniverse event will be whit- tled to 15 tonight. These hen will compete for the final decision Friday night. Gromyko today there is now little' hope for success of the Big Four conference unless Gromyko abandons key So- viet demands for a stopgap agreement on Berlin. Herter made a new attack on Soviet proposals which he said would reserve the Soviet threat against West Berlin as a weapon against the West and would also turn over ne- gotiations on German unifi- cation 'to an East-West'.Ger- man committee. He branded these Soviet proposals obstacles to an ac cord arid said that unless they can be overcome there is clearly little hope for the success of the Geneva con- ference. THOUGH HERTER did not: say so in the meeting at the Palace of Nations, .Western! leaders were reported to feel their pessifnism about the outcome was confirmed by statements made by Soviet Prernicr Nikila S. Khrushchev. Khrushchev warned in a statement issued in Warsaw Wednesday night that unless the Western powers accept Soviet requirements for a Ber- lin true? the Soviet govern- ment will back up Communist East Germany in taking what- ever'action it considers neces- sary to "liquidate the abnor- mal situation" in West Berlin. ON RETURNING to Mos- (Continued Page A-8, Col. 1) SHORT HILLS, N. J. The father of missing social- ite Jacqueline Gay Hart con- ferred for an hour and 10 minutes with Newark Police Director Joseph F. Weldon and other officials today. Weldon told newsmen he had no developments to report. "We, are going over all the ground said the girl's father. Ralph A. Hart. "We are trying everything.- But there is not a thing in the world new. I' wish there was. I wish to God there was." c FEAR THAT the 21-year- old beauty may have met with foul play was expressed, meantime, by an- other official and a spokes- man for the family. Lt. Joseph Lawless of the Port of. New York Authority police said foul play is a def- inite possibility. The girl WHS last seen Tuesday night a' Newark Airport, which is. pperated by .the authority, She had driven her fiance, Stanley Galnes, to the air- port. She vanished after' he took off for Pittsburgh, Pa. "The parents are afraid she may have suffered foul said the Rev. Herbert H. Cooper, rector of Christ Epis- copal Church. THE GIRL'S execu- tive vice. president of the Col- gate Palmolive Co., told Wel- don at a Newark nieeling that Jacqueline had been in- terested in dramatics and once appeared in a Columbia Broadcasting System play. He added that she had apparent- ly lost Interest in acting and was concentrating on her planned Aug. 29 wedding. Weldon, however, sent dc (Continued Page A-8, Col. BLONDE SOCIALITE Jacqueline Gay Hart, above, is the object of a wide search after her mysterious disappearance from Newark, N. J., airport. (Continued Page A-8, Col. 4) 20-Yr. WAC Garb Supply Jars Probe WASHINGTON of waste and mis- management in the mullibillion dollf.r foreign-aid pro-; Mi ynn sram marked Honsft hnm-innc Oil- I I on THE NEW MISS USA, Terry Lynn Huntingdon gets a congratulatory hug from her blonde roommate, Miss Sweden, as they {Xrse early i i CHARGE AID-FUND WASTE VPin Plea; or Peace at toss Airport Soviet Boss Rips U. S. Attitude as Visitors Arrive By PRESTON GROVKR Vice Presl- cnt Richard M. Nixon flew nto Moscow today with a ilea for friendship! He found he atmosphere remicr Nikila S. Khrushchev again blasting the United Suites for its altitude toward :he Soviet Union. The two leaders did. not meet face to face; that was to come later. But while Nixon was getting an official wel- come at the airport, Krush- chev was talking to a Sports Palace crowd welcoming him home from a 9-dny trip to Poland. He again took the United Stales to for pro- claiming this week as Captive Nations Week, and said: "They send their governors here (referring to the recent visit of nine U. S. They send ihcfr vice presi- dent here. They arc opening c.xhihit then they do a thing like A KHRUSHCHEV'S remarks seemed calculated to steal from Nixon Ihe drama of the arrival of the highest U. Si official to visit Ilic Soviet U. S. Jetliner Breaks Russ Speed Mark MOSCOW huge white and blue jet blazed a nonstop aerial trial from New York to Moscow today. It spanned the miles In S hours 53 minutes, smash- ing the record set by Soviet TU114 turbojet 10 days ago with Frol R. Kuzlov aboard. The Soviet plane took 9 hours 48 minutes. Occasionally flying 610 miles an hour, the Boeing 707- 321 carried 73 newsmen and government aids accompany- ing Vice President Richard M. Nixon. THE PILOT was ready, to land at 8 hours 45 minutes, but the air lower delayed his landing. While soft music vfras piped through the plane's intercom, the brand new airliner flew mos.t of the way across the Atlantic at a minimum cruls ing speed of 575 m.p.h. It flew between and feet without a bump during the flight. subcommittee hearings made public today. In one unnamed country in-i vcstigators found a 20-year supply of WAC clothing, g 45-year supply of 30-caliber carbine ammunition, sets of new tire chains left outside without storage and more than a million new car- jine and submachine gun clips wasting away. .'n Pakistan, U.S. aid offi- cials reportedly had a fleet of 229 IN PERU, a former aid of- ficial testified, the U.S. aid chief used American and Peruvian technicians to im- and just bcforc he lcft prove a livestock operation in (Continued Page A-8, Col, 3) Weather- VariiMe cloudiness tote tonight and early Friday, but mostly and. sunny Friday. Slightly warmer. Maximum tem- perature by noon today: 76, passenger cars 529 MOSCOW Presi- dent Nixon made his first try at speaking Russian at the airport on his arrival here today, wading right in :wiih the phrase "Long Live Peace." He said it summed up tl 2 feeling of the American gov- helpers for a staff of Americans. and the Americni people. Mis smiling effort t.> speak the language drew scattered applause and a rip- ple of amused laughter from the airport crowd. Nixon has been trying to bone up on Russian phra.s WHERE TO FIND IT More names of persons due federal appear he admitted that his thus far were "pretty poor.1' Nixon delivered his arrival speech in English and it was translated into Russian. income-tax refunds in "Forgotten For- tune" list on page C-6. Beach Combing B-l. Hal Page A-Z3. Page A-23. Pages to 12. Comks Pages B-8, 9. Crossword Page Death Page B-2. Page A-22. Financial Page B-3. Shipping Page A-16. Pages C-l to 5. Theaters Page B4. M. TV, Page B-l I. Vital Page B-4. Women Pages B-4, 8. Ywif Page Scnatt Finally OKs Stewart Promotion WASHINGTON W> Movie star James Stewart nt long last won promotion to- day to brigadier general in the Air Force Reserve. By voice vote and..without a word of debate, the Sen- ate finally approved the pro- motion which has been bogged in controversy since 1957. The long delay was dus chiefly to opposition from Sen. Margaret Chase Smith (R-Maine) who questioned that Stewart, a World War II combat pilot, had put (rj I as much time as he should 'have at reserve duties.   

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