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Press Telegram: Tuesday, July 21, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 21, 1959, Long Beach, California                             'USA' JUDGING TONIGHT: NEW MISS N.M. ARRIVES Staff Photo by Chuck Suodcmlil A SUIT FOR A QUEEN 'Miss Carol Jones, a pretty Baptist Sunday School teacher who is the new Miss New Mexico, ad- mires the bathing suit she was tssued'after her ar- rival here by plane to compete in Universe contest. She replaces Sue Jngersoll, who quit.. Substitute Beauty Is Bible Instructor By MARY NEISVVENDER "A Baptist Sunday'school teacher who. never par- ticipated in any kind of a beauty contest and has a CatholicIbqy. 'friend. today replaced, .controversial. Sue Sinione Jngersoil as New .entry1in the. Miss. Field of 46 to Narrow Down to 15 All 79 in Pageant to Appear Before Selections Begin By HERB SHANNON Arlene Howell begins her ast two days of rule as the :urrent Miss United States of America today as 46 candi- dates for her title prepare for >reliminary judging in Mu- nicipal Auditorium tonight. Rehearsals for the first! elimination event of the Miss Jniyerse Pageant this morn- ng involved both foreign and domestic contestants, al- though the judging toniglit will affect only the Miss USAJ entries. s Fifteen finalists for the pag- eant's second top honor will be chosen starting at 8 p.m. (Additional stories and pictures on Pages A-2, A-3, and B-l.) A parade of all 79 contenders for Miss Universe honors will precede the eliminations. The ceremonies will be televised n Channel I. The S fivemng Netespmper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, JULY 21, 1959 Vol. 145 PRICE 10 CENTS 32 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1181 CLASSIFIED HE HOME EDITION [Six Editions Daily) Summit Meet Chances Fading, President Feels he foreign contestants will >e dressed in what the pag- onlght's event will he Byron 'aimer. The program includes inger Roberta Lynn, Manny Harmon' 'and his orchestra Arthur Murray and the Dancers. Universe Pageant. Petite Carol Jones, 23-year- secretary, signed, in officially as Miss Ney ;Mexico after a hurry-up telephone call from the New Mexico sponsor and a flight to Beach. had any sleep sinpeJiSunday the 5- replacement stam- mered to the press in an im- priD'mptu conference. "But thetnVji couldn't sleep anyway. excited. THE BROWN-EYED hru- netfe arrived at International Airport at a.m., came directly to the Lafayette Ho- began a whirlwind roufid'of preparations. was fitted fqt.'jier bathing suit, then ru'jh'ed to rehearsals for -to- nigTif's show in Municipal j-J'jl have to buy myself a T was in such a hurry telephone call at p.mj-CMonday) that I forgot to'pjjck one. But then, I didn't hayj 'one that would be suit- abl.et, the 106-pound beatify said. GIRL, who was ap pointed Miss Welcome to Al buqu'erque two years ago, is one'-j'of four children. Her fatljey, Everett, is i plumb Th'e. Albuquerque beauty saidr'.she has a steady boy (Continued Page A-5, Col. 3) RiQindrops Jiist Fooling, Bureau Says A few fat raindrops fell in sections of Long Beach about 8 a.m. today but the Weather Bureau disclaimed any re- sponsibility and promised there was no storm in the offing. .the rain was not measure- aljle and was hardly enough to dampen the sidewalks. The forecast generally is for most- ly.'sunny skies today with night'and morning low clouds Wednesday and high temper- atures in the mid-80s. .Pasadena and other foothill communities 1 s o reported slight traces of rain. Launch 1st A-Powered Cargo Ship CAMDEN, N.J. (ffl The of the first atom powered merchant "ship 3a vannah was hailed today as a 'bold and enterprising experi- ment in the .daring and dis- tinguished annals" of Ameri- can science and seafaring. Acting Secretary of Com- merce Frederick H. Mueller set forth that view in an ad- dress a few minutes before the nuclear-energy driven Savannah slid down the launching ways today. t t t 'THIS M "was. born of (he inspiration of our distinguished President Dwight D. Eisenhower and be- came a reality through bis leadership and enthusiasm translated into legislation by the Congress of the Umiec States." The President's wife was Winners of the two popu- a'riljf contests' initiated dur- ng Sunday's parade will be named during the ceremonies. Trophies will be presented to he "Most Popular Girl in selected by .vote of :he spectators, and "Miss chosen by news Russ Stand Pat Despite West Threat Gromyko Insists on Creation of Ail-German Unit GENEVA For- THE AMERICAN entries fign Minisler A- wll wear formal gowns slood firm todtty his formula for a Bcrlin-Ger- mnn settlement in the face of :ant officials have designated' western threat to break off native costumes. h Geneva talks. Master of ceremonies for Gromyko insisted .on his demand for the creation an all-German committee photographers pageant. covering the WEDNESDAY NIGHT the 15 finalists will vie for the title of Miss United States. (Continued Page A-5, Col. 6) he price of a Berlin truce agreement. He made-his posi- ion clear at a :sccret session A U. S. 'spokesman-sale :here was no progress in Ih'u 90-minute discussion, wh'ch oil owed a luncheon at Gro myko's villa. Officials saic hat as a practical matter it appears the meetings wil continue next week. Secretary of State Christian A. Hcrter told Gromyko at a secret session Monday that mless there is some progress nere in the next few days, the West will bring tho con ference to a speedy conclu McKay Still in Serious Condition SALEM, Ore. las McKay, former interior secretary, remained in serious condition today at Salem Gen- eral Hospital. McKay, 66, entered the hos- pital a week ago with a recur- rence of a heart ailment. Hos- pital attendants saic) his con dition was complicated late Monday by kidney trouble. Hospital spokesmen saic the ex-secretary's heart con- dition involved high blood pressure. Stuart Lanciefield was attending McKay who has HELPED FROM CANYON Police and ambulance attendants assist Mrs. Norma Briggs, 34, up ihe side of a canyon from wrecked aulo (background) in Santa Monica Mountains. Mrs, Briggs told officers her husband, Robert, sent the Mrs. Briggs and her the side of Press Wirephoto.) IT WAS REPORTED that Herter warned Gromyko for] the second day running that] the West stands ready to break off the talks unless thej Soviets lower their price for (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) USW Asks Aluminum Pay Hike NEW YORK, July 21 Sleelworkers union president David ,1. McDonald turned his liwna'rdTno" for wnilc to tional Forest has been con-ncfiollallons Wlth taincd and is expected to bc'comPanies' a setrlc- Fire Crews Contain Big Bear Lake Blaze LUCERNE VALLEY I'M A fire that destroyed conlroled by nightfall. He been in an oxygen lent most oral new fires Monday and of the time since entering the more such storms are due to- hospital. day, the Weather Bureau said. there for cere- mony of giving the ship its name and sending the Savan- nah down the ways to the water. It is the country's iirst non-military atomic vessel. t LOUIS E. WOLFSONJ chairman of the board of New York Shipbuilding Corp. which is building the Savan- nah, said the launching "means more than life for from her upset stomachjtor' new ship." The fire started last slrikc 10 miles northwest of Big Bear Lake, burning through Silver Creek Canyon on the west, Deep Canyon in its mid- dle fork, and Dry Canyon on the east. Thunderstorms ignited sev- ment there might shorten the Mental Aid for Mate Trying Cliff Killings SA.NTA MONICA husband who sent car-with his wife and in it over a 450-j foot cliff was under psychiatric observation today in [I I ki Mueller to ke Thinks May Not Want Parley Views Continuing Geneva Deadlock in Pessimistic Light By M. L, ARROWSMITH WASHINGTON ent Elsenhower believes the :hnnces for a summit con- erencc have'become steadily dimmer in the last 10 days, feels Russia's attitude re- garding Berlin now is oughcr than ever, This Eisenhower pessimism on confidential re- ports from the Geneva for- sign, ministers known on excellent author- ity, H embraces his view that Premier Nikita Khrushchev may not even want n summit meeting. It also Is known on high authority that Eisenhower still Is dead set against any recognition of Red China. Tho Communists there still are holding Americans as prisoners. IT CAN BE reported, too, on similar authority that: 1, Despite his pessimism, Elsenhower remains perfectly willing to attend a summit meeting, provided there is clqcenl progress nt Geneva. That means Soviet recogni- tion of Western rights and responsibilities In West Berlin. 2. Regardless of talk by Kremlin officials, Eisenhower the prison ward of general hospital. al (Continued Page A-5, Col. 2) i EVEN PRESIDENT met for nearly two with members of hisl aluminum negotiating learns, who have been bargaining with the three major alumi- num producers for more tian week. The union teams were Queen Is Recovered, Won't Change Tour EDMONTON, Alia. he felt she Bul-i Queen Elizabeth II has recov-1" said, "Nor would the doc- scheduled to return to the jargaining tables this after- noon, but McDonald said he would not be present. 9 MCDONALD. SAID the un-i :on has not yet received rc-l (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) j O "It means the birth of entire new era for merchant continued, "and new hopes the world over for the furtherance of nuclear power for peaceful Wolfson announced the es- tablishment by the corpora- this morning and found her and no further changes are ex- i" the royal tour of! BUTLER ALSO announced anada, a court official ?n-jthe Queen will fly back to nounced today. Esmond Butler, the Queen's press secretary, told newsmen aboard the royal train that a Britain at the end of the tour Aug. I instead of sailing home aboard the royal yacht. He said this has nothing to do lion of the "Mamie Eisen- doctor examined the Queenjwith the Queen's illness and involves a three-day royal visit to the Shetland Islands in the north of Scotfand. well rested after a weekend hower award, to be prp.-'frce of official engagements, sented annually to the person[ He denied British press ie- The young British monarch or organization who, in that Prince Philip hadjwas smiling and relaxed opinion of the his wife to cancel thclarriving here Monday night board, makes the most ont-jrest of her strenuous Cana-jfrom the Yukon, where ahe standing contribution to ad-jdian tour and return home.i was. forced to skip two days vancement of nuclear pro- "The duke (Prince appearances because of an would not let her go on todayiupset stomach. WHERE TO FIND IT Today's "Forgotten For- tune" tax-heirs list is on Page D-l. Beach B-l. Hal B-7. B-7. D-2 to 7. 5. C-8. B-2. B4. R-3. Shipping D-I, C-I, 2, 3. TMes, TV, D-8. B-7. B-4, 5.- Sure Tough to Phone a 'U1 Beauty "Someone keeps tele- phoning from Miss Brazil's hostess, Mrs. Vera Chalmers said. "Who is inquired 115-year-old Vera Ribeiro of Rio de Janeiro. "Fellow by name of Kubilschek." "Good said Miss Brazil. "That must be Juscclino Ktibitschck." "Well, anyway, he's called three times while been out. Who did you say he 'The president of Brazil." NOW IT WAS Mrs. Chalmers' turn. "Good she said. Then she added: "What do we do now? The switch- hoard said that Kubitschek said it was urgent. Do we phone him Miss Ribeiro didn't have a ready answer. Anyway, she had to dash off to ft pageant rehearsal. "I can't understand why he] would do his wife sobbed Monday as police tied! i j up Robert J. Briggs, 39, J OD building contractor, at the scene. Officers reported he WASHINGTON was muttering incoherently, and had tried women on the head of Gfand rocks and a pick ax when sccctary of car stopped part way down commcrcc dent Eisenhower today nom- to beat the Frederick Henry Muel- the lonely canyon dropoff. _ ii- j i t nuo II11 vi 11 Jti." Briggs is held on suspicion of commerce since Oct. aecanlf irttrvnf tn rnm- _ r of assault with intent to com- mit murder. THE WIFE, Norma, 34, and tier mother, Mrs. Mary D. Nil- son, 65, suffered only cuts and bruises in the ordeal. Po- lice said the women reported no previous trouble with Briggs. Mrs. Briggs said her hus- band offered to take them for a ride along Rustic Canyon a ride they had many limes before. Mueller has been undersec- taken 31, 1958. For two years before that he was assistant secre- tary for domestic affairs. Me has been acting secre- tary since Rear Adm. Lewis L. Strauss stepped out of the commerce spot after the Sen- ate rejected his nomination. jStrauss had been serving under a recess appointment made while Congress was not in session. A native of Grand Rapids, Mueller was born there Nov. At the cliff, she said her 22- 1893. He was. in the furni- husband complained that the ture manufacturing business He before entering government the service. engine was overheating, got out, looked under hood and without warn ing, reached inside and pushed the "drive" button in the automatic push-outton transmission. Weather- Low clouds late to- night and early Wednes- day, but sunny Wednes- day afternoon. Little change in temperature, 3 Air-Raid Sirens Whinc-Accidentalry Three Long Beach air-raid sirens sounded about a.m. today when General Tele-' phone crews made the wrong connections while working oo a cable. The sirens were lo- cated at Magnolia Ave., and Seaside Blvd., Locust and I4th St., and Ocean Blvd. Alamitos Ave.   

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