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Press Telegram: Thursday, July 16, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 16, 1959, Long Beach, California                             70 MISS U BEAUTIES ARRIVE FROM Universe LEFT at airport are Karen Krancus, Miss Welcome; Luz Zuloaga, Miss CONTESTANTS IN THE Miss United States division of the Miss eign contestants landed at Long Beach Municipal Airport. Their iverse; Arlene Howell, Miss USA; and Olga Pmnarejo, Miss Colombia. Universe contest line up at plaueside loday after they and for- arrival officially launched the annual beauty pageant. Greet Entries at L. B. Airport FACES 92ND OPERATION X-Ray Victim Tells 64-Year Ordeal of Pain CHICAGO lay wreck of a man after 64 years of pain and 91 of the first vic- tims of radiation. lie spokes from only half a mouth, and his words were sometimes bitter. The operations also have claimed his left hand, most of his nose, his upper lips and parts of his cheek and jaw. He asks, "Why should I, an innocent individual, have to suffer like this? For 61 years 1 have known pain." THE WHITE-HAIRED MAN is Dr. Emil H. Gruhhe, 84, credited by medical science with being the first, to apply radiation in an attempt to cure cancer. Friday he is scheduled to undergo his 92nd operation for radiation burns and cancer resulting from some of his experiments. Doctors say they probably will have to remove two fingers from his right hand. Dr. Grubbe gave a rare news conference Wednesday in Swedish Covenant Hospital "t WAS THE FIRST ONE burned by he said. He told how in 1895, as a physicist, he worked on 1 the manufacture of platinum vacuum tubes called Crookes tubes, used to rarify gases. Many times he touched the tubes or brought them near his face, not knowing of the danger. An irritation appeared on his hand, but he didn't know what it was. Then on Nov. 8, 1895, the discovery of X rays was announced by Wilhelm Roentgen. "f knew then I had been burned by X Dr. Grubbe said. "They were produced in the Crookes tubes. From that day on I protected myself from the rays. Bui it was too late.'1 SIX MONTHS LATER he had his first operation for radiation burns. In the meantime, Dr. Grubbe, on Jan. 26, 1896, began treating a woman afflicted with breast cancer by expos- ing her to X rays. The pain left her shortly. Since then he has instructed more than doctors in radiology techniques. Dr. Grubbe declines the role of a martyr, but admits he would nol have conducted his experiments if he could have seen the results. "No, not with all the misery I've he said. 2-Car Crash Kills 6 Near Calif. Town 5 in Fullerton Family Perish in Highway Collision BEAUMONT header collision of two cars killec six persons near here today. Five were members of one amity. Two persons wore injurec critically. Tlie Highway Patrol re ported (lie cars smashed to ;etlier on Highway 60 abou wo miles west of Beaumont V CAUSE OF the crash hac nol been learned. The dead: Mrs. Martha Elizabct Lancy, 21; Oltn Keith Lancj 17; Terry Uincy, 4; Eugene 54, and Thclma Lane) 50, all of Fullerton; and Jess Bell, about 30, believed from Branson, Mo. The injured are Mersclie Ylilford Laney, 25, Fullerton driver of one of the cars, an Mrs. Mamie H. Bell, about 31 whose husband, Jesse, was til other driver. HOME The Southland's Finest Evening or LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, JULY 16, Vol. Ml PRICE 10 CENTS PAGES CLASSIFIED UK EDITION (Six Editions Daily) JUNO HITS 50 YARDS FROM BLOCKHOUSE Big Satellite Rocket Explodes on Launching, Perils 55 in Fall CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. giant Juno II rocket exploded shortly after lifting off its launch- ing pad here today in an effort to put up an earth satellite. All of the 55 per- sons in the blockhouse al the launching site escaped injury. The rocket rose a few feel, flared out with a roar of flames and blew up. The Air Force was un- able to give any immediate explanation of what caused the mishap. Among the 55 persons in the blockhouse al the time woe Brig. Gen. John Bar- clay, commander of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, and Dr. Kurt Debus, director of flight operations for the project. The blockhouse is lo- cated about 50 yards from the launching pad. The blockhouse is north- west of the launching pad. The rocket fell west of (he pad and about 50 yards from the blockhouse. Black smoke continued to rise from the launching area for several minutes after the explosion. There was no officials estimate of what damage may have been done to the launching area. The satellite doomed by the explosion was called Explorer VI. It contained a virtual flying space labora- tory designed to probe many mysteries of space and weather, Its main goal was a study of cosmic radial ion, The Juno II is a 76-foot rocket. It consists of the Army's Jupiter intermedi- ate range ballistic missile and three solid-fuel upper stages. The versatile Jupiter has racked up 20 successes in 21 shots. This missile logged 17 good war weapons tests, served as the first stage for space probes Pioneer III and IV and carried space monkeys Able and Baker on (heir historic I rip into space and back last May 28. Man Caught at Level Saved Top Steel Gov. Brown Joins S. Asks Unionists Demo Liberal Group Russ Get Reigning Pageani Queen at Scene; Flu Grounds Trio By HERB SHANNON Beauty was Ihe lickcl of ip.issagc as a special Trans Airlines flight winged nlo LOUR Beach Municipal from New York City his morning, hearing some '0 global contenders for the crown of Miss Universe. The sleek ship and its qually streamlined cargo touched down al. a.m. to a barrage ol clicking shutters Additional Story on Page A-2J. from news, television and newsrcel cameras and the cheers of nearly wailing spectators. First of Ihc fair fares (o descend from Ihc plane and set off a crescendo of shutlcr- snappinp were Iho European entries, dressed in gay native npparel. Tour Lines PITTSBURGH of- KINGS CANYON SE- rjcers of the United Steel- Goldfine Alters Plea Begs Court's Mercy WASHINGTON industrialist Ber- nard Goldfine today withdrew his plea of innocent to a contempt of Congress indictment and threw himself upon the mercy of the court, Goldfine pleaded "no con- test." In legal language the plea is nolo contendere. U. S. District Judge James W. Morris accepted the plea over the opposition of Asst. U. S. Ally. William Hilz. Morris, saying he couldn't understand why there should be opposition lo Ihe no con- test plea, called it a very for- tunate disposition of the case. 9 MORRIS COULD impose a sentence as high as a year in! jail plus a fine, but! gave every indication that he would he more ienienl. Goldfine was indicted for refusing to answer qucslionsj before the House subcommit- tee on legislative oversight last summer concerning the Tinancial affairs of the Boston Port Development Co., of which he is the majority stockholder. .Goldfine's companies .had had difficulties with two fed eral agencies, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Com mission. The suited hearings which re- in Goldfine's indict- QU01A NATIONAL PARK Air Force turbo jet helicopter today plucked a bleeding and bruised fisher- man from the level of the of the highest altitude rescues ever made in the West. Robert Moser, 54, of Palm Springs, injured.-Tuesday when dragged by a pack mule, was flown from a meadow three miles from Sky Blue Lake lo Lore Pine. There he was Iransferred lo another aircraft and sped to a Visalia hospital. Capt. Walter Hodgson snd Maj. R. S. Martin of Edwards Air Force Base manned the high-flying rescue helicopter. workers set off today for a tour of mill lowns to fill in rank-and-filc members on the! two-day-old steel strike. i There was no indication of an early break in the walkoul of sleehvorkers. As Prell-Teleflrjwn WaihlnQlon Surearu Edmund G. (Pat) Brown Wednesday joined the Democratic Party's most dis- tinguished lineup of liberals in membership on the Democratic Advisory Council. Mis appointment was an- union marked mcnt brought disclosures of his gifts and favors to poli ticians, including Sherman Adams, then President Eisen- hower's top aide. Adams re signed after the hearings. Some of Tax Heirs1 Names and lime managcmcnl Ihe walkoul L. A. Infant Beaten by Couple Dies) Some of the names ap- pearing in The Press-Tele- gram's daily list of "For- gotten Fortune" (ax heirs no doubt appear to be mis- spelled. But that Is the way (he names are spelled in In- ternal Revenue Service files. If your name is even though notify IRS and qualify for your income-tax refund. Today'i list Is on Page C-5. ONE OF MOSER'S three fishing companions had hiked out with the first word of his plight. Wednesday, Dr. Robert D Karstaedt, of Porterville, who had been camping in the park area, reached the injured i man. The physician rode in on! horseback with ranger Les! Samman. Later five more rangers were shuttled in by air lo Ihe Tunnel Meadow landing strip. 16 miles from the lake, and went the rest of the way by i horseback. Wednesday night the rang- ers and the doctor carried Moscr the three miles to the meadow pickup site. spawned growing unemploy- ment areas of the nation's economy. President David J. McDon- ald planned to tour Bethle- hem, Pa., Trenton, N.J., Phila- delphia and other Eastern steel points during the week- end. Vice President Howard R. Hague was scheduled lo visit Chicago and Calumet, 111., and Gary, Ind., while Secretary Treasurer I. W. Abel concen- trated on the Pittsburgh area. LOS ANGELES (UPI) 13-month-oId boy who bcalen lasl Friday wilh an R. try's Conrad chief Cooper, indus negotiator (Continued Page A-6, Col. THEN FAMILIAR domcslic mingled with the intri- cate bodice-stitching of Ihe foreign costumes as the Unil- ed Stales contestants who had raveled to New York for the light here joined Iho group GENEVA at lhcr of of Slate Christian Hcrter for day called on Russia lo stop! Among ihose greeting the i trying lo make PropagandaiPUmcload Pi'lchr.lude were nounced hy Party Cha.rman d c'Sht contestants who ar 'to Work' Paul Butler. The announce- ment evoked immediate rc- iaclion that Brown's selection iwas a tribute to his emer- gence as a possible serious Democralicl in I960. out agreement on Berlin crisis. Me challenged Russia's An- heiT curlier Ihis week to represent South American and Oriental nations, and the drei Gromyko lo cut oul'hostesses local clubwomen "bogus slogans" like a wil1 bc lhe contestants' city" of West Berlin and gci'thaperones for the duration 'down to seeking specific ltlc patjeant. iprovcincnts in the crisis Also on were the I here was also speculation1' r Ihis was another step inl j Ice trie Is nip cord by ma j pjjmgg nolher and her common-law Bullcr's attempt lo consoli- husband died early loday at Children's Hospital. Scott Brown earlier had undergone heart surgery. date his strength among party members who will have con- siderable influence at the convention. Thus Butler hopes rather than mere change nf'reigning Miss Universe, Luz j Marina Zuloaga of Colombia; Hcrter emphasized that thc'.Miss U.S.A., Arlene Howell; basic problem was to makcjand Miss Welcome to Long arrangements that would Beach, Karen Krancus mainlain the freedom nf the His mother, Florence Ann lo line UP a 5olid Phalanx of Brown, 18, and peoples of West Berlin and new crisis before iprcvent exercised js Goff, 24, of Hollywood, thB advisory council, o combat Ihc "moderate" in- milled beating Ihe infant to lnc rnoacratc m- ston him from crvinc. of the congressional stop him from crying, police said. Both had been charged In felony complainl wilh as- saull likely to produce greal bodily harm. New charges were cxpeclcd to he filed. i leaders, Sen. Lyndon John (Continued Page A-4, Col. 4) Maywood Steel Strike a Gentlemanly 'War' WHERE TO FIND IT Khrushchev pledges his sol emn word in speech in Poland lhal Russia will never start a war against anyone, any vhcre at any lime. Story on 'age A-3. WEATHER Low clouds late to- night and early Friday. Mostly sunny Friday and little change in tempera- ture. Maximum tempera- ture by noon today: 77. LOS ANGELES slit each other's throats gently around here." So said Ihc chairman of the striking United Steel- workers Union Local 2058 he leaned back in a U. S. Steel Co. chair and planted his feet on a com- pany desk in an air- conditioned company office. Yes, sir! You'd hardly be- lieve it, but the steel com- pany set up a portable field office for the pickets out- side ils Maywood plant here. They even ran in special waler and power lines. It provides shade for the pickcls as they cat iheir lunch. Otto Osier, plant super- intendent, and Robert Paige, chairman of ihe union local, were even seen to smile al each other as Ihey went about their duties on opposite sides of the high wire fence sur- rounding (he planl. THREE OF THE beauties (Continued Page Col. 1) secretary thai an-. The American warned Gromyko oilier Berlin crisis flnrcup, could plunge Ihc world inlo: the United Nations lo help no-! lice a Berlin truce agreement. APPEALED to Policeman, Teller Held Gromyko lo consider bringing' NILES, Ohio gun Beach B-l. Hal B-9. B-9. C-5 to 11 A-20, 21. A-9. Death B-2. B-8. B-3. Shipping C-5. C-I lo 4. B-6. Tides, TV, C-12. Vila! B-ft. Pages B-4, 5. Your A-2. an adequate U. N. slaff into' Berlin. The slaff. with free access o both West and East Berlin, would report on propaganda activities that might disturb the public order or seriously affect the rights of others. Hertcr described this as a form of "international scruti- ny" over one aspect of Ber lin's life. Hcrter delivered the appeal as Ihe conference headed towards whal may be a cru- cial East-West showdown on Russia's Berlin demands. The key item in the Soviet proposal is establishment ol an all-German committee in which the Communist Easl (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) man robbed a teller and her woman bank police escort of an estimated to- day. The teller. Miss Judy Whit- ney, 21, and Patrolman An- thony Marsico had just left the Niles bank when the gun- man appeared and forced them inlo Marsico's cruiser. Miss Whitney was transfer- ring the money from Ihe Nilcs Bank to the McKinley Federal Savings and Loan Co., wheru she is employed. The policeman said he was forced lo drive the cruiser to Stevens Park, where he and Miss Whitney were blind- folded and forced out. The gunman escaped, ap- parently in another car wail- ing at Slevens Park.   

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