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Press Telegram: Wednesday, July 15, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 15, 1959, Long Beach, California                             NEW STRIKE-END PLAN ,UUU IU vjKttl BEAUT 80 Miss U Girls Due to Fly Here Thursday The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, JULY 15, 1959 Vot. No. 140 PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-nei -.58 PAGES CLASSIFIED HE 2-6359 HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) Ike Rules Out Use in Steel Tie-Up President Says Nation Not Yet Periled by Strike WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower said today present conditions do nol warrant invoking the Taft Hartley Law in an effort to end the steel strike. At a news conference, Ei senhower declined to specu late on when steel stockpile, might be reduced to a poin which would imperil nationa defense. The Tafl-Hartley Law per mits the government to seel a court order'to end any wor stoppage which the Presiden finds is a -threat to nationa security. "biscussing the strike whic commenced Tuesday midnigh Eisenhower hope that free bargaining he tween the steel companies an the union will result quickl in a new contract. PRESIDENT w: asked specifically to estimate, on Ihe basis of his knowledge regarding steel stockpiles, how long the srike could con- tinue before it interfered defense production. Eisenhower replied that he could make no accurate esli mate. But, he said, if all of the inventories on hand should be used up, there would be a very serious situation. "A reporter asked whether Eisenhower thought, now ih.it a strike is under way, that the government should have pur- sued any different course in its efforts to head off a shut- down. Eisenhower replied that he is convinced the government Urges Panel Headed by Warren Man McDonald's Letter Given to Industry Negotiating Team NEW YORK The Slcchvorkers Union t o d a proposed the industry agree to submit strike issues to a facl-finding board to be head- ed by a neutral selected by Chief Justice Warren of the United States. David J. McDonald, Steel- workers Union president, made the proposal in a letter to the industry's four-man ne- gotiating team. McDonald pioposed that the industry and union agree to the fact-finding procedure to sift the facts involved in all strike issues. The union proposed that the investigating board be composed of a man named bj the union, another hy the in dustry and an Impartial mem >er to be named by Warren More than spectators, and about that many mem- bers of the metropolitan, local and foreign press, still photographers, news reel and television cameramen, are scheduled to greet more than 80 beauties from around the world when they arrive Thursday at Long Beach Mu- nicipal Airport to unofficially open the Miss Universe Beauty Pageant. The planeload of global glamor, due to arrive in a special TWA plane at a.m., also will be met by pageant hostesses, all local clubwomen who will chaper- one the beauty queens during the pageant. Among official greeters will be Luz Marina Zuloaga of Columbia, reigning M'ss Universe, Miss United St.ues, UNION PRESIDENT ON THE PICKET LINE David .1. McDonald, president of United Stcelworkers, smiles as he is given a sign .proclaiming him "No. 1" picket by employes of the U. S. Steol Corp.'s Fairless Works at Morrisville, Pa., today. Strike started at 26 Injured Find 11 Booby Traps When Bus After Convicts Yield Tips Over MCDONALD'S LETTER to nduslry negotiators came as he industry ground smoothly to a stop on dead center in the grip of the sixth major shutdown since World War II. There was no sign when it might get rolling again. A half-million stcelworkers struck after two months of contracts negotiations that had gotten nowhere. Pickets appeared nt four steel plants in the Los An geles area. In Fontana, pickets np pearcd ahead of schedule a Kaiser's big steel plant. They picketed gates there at 10-A5 Tuesday night. It made littli difference, however Kaisei officials had started cooling Arlenc Howell of Louisiana, and Miss Welcome to Long Beach Karen Krnncu.s. a FOLLOWING THE airport ceremonies, the girls in a caravan of convertibles that wil remain at their disposal for the remainder of the Pa- geant, will he driven to Ihe Lafayette Hotel, where they will be fitted for swim suits. They will continue to meet the press and press photo- graphers, as they will Fn'iaj and Saturday morning, in prc for the Pageant's opening ceremonies Saturday night al the Veterans Me morial Stadium. Official program for the eighth annual Miss Universe Beauty Pageant follows: Thursday, July 16, a.m arrive at Lon Beach Municipal Airport; reg MISS BOLIVIA, smiling Corina Taborga, tests the temperature in swimming pool as she poses for the photographer after arrival here today to take part in Miss Universe photo.) Monday, July Auditorium. ister at Lafayclle Hotel. Saturday, July 18, 8 p.m.- Opening ceremonies, Veterans Memorial Stadium. Sunday, July 19, p.m. of 124 units, beauty delegates riding individual loats, downtown Long Beach. ants visit Columbia Motion Picture Studio. Tuesday, July 21, 8 Selection of 15 Miss United States finalists; award of tro- ALEXANDRIA, Minn. UP1- More than a score of persons wcro .injured when a Winni- peg to Chicago Greyhound bus Bourse was right. We have to have free bargaining in (Continued Page A-4, Col. 1) WHERE TO FIND IT Dutch, Scandinavians, Ger- mans are disturbed over the Russian offensive against Europe, B. H. Bidder reports from abroad. Story on Page A-13. or dozing came. Beach B-l. Hal A-23. A-2S. C-6 to 12. B-10, II. A-18. Death B-2. A-22. B-3. Shipping A-ll, C-l lo 5. B-6. Tides, TV, B-12. Vital C-6. A-23. B-l, 5. Your A-2. PETROS, Tenn. Mountain Prison of- ficials reported today they have, found 11 dynamite booby traps in a prison coal mine where rebellious convicts held three foremen captive for 32 hours. "They had used their mine car batteries to rig up booby Warden Frank Llewel- lyn said. "Anywhere from. to 10 sticks of dynamite were used in each trap." The warden said it probably would take all day to searcn LONDON UP) British oul lhc mine wlierc tlle con high court today ordered an victs Sta8cd thcir sit-down Power Heir Gifts Must out of control and over on its side nearj during a heavy rainstorm' _ i ue-sday night. IRQ Returned Twenty persons, many of hem Canadians, were treated t the Douglas County Hos- >ital here and police said at east another half dozen were aken to Mercy Hospital. None she received from an can millionaire now confined to' a sanitarium as mentally ncompetent. The millionaire is George Westinghouse Jr., described in court as son of the founder of Westinghouse Electric Co. Englishwoman to give back more than in gifts The prisoners gave up Tues day after officials issued an ultimatum. vas believed seriously hurt. Most passengers were asleep when the smash FRANCOISE MECHELET, 26, Toronto, said he was rid- ng in the rear of the upper deck of the highway cruiser when suddenly it began to swerve from side to side. 'I was dozing when the rocking of the bus woke me Mcchelet said. "Before I could gather my senses, the bus tipped over and I was thrown out, either through a Westinghouse, 76, is in a Ca nadian sanitarium at Westminster, B. C. Thursday, July 23, 8 Selection of 15 finalists for Miss Univerc title and award of trophy lo Miss Friendship. Municipal Auditorium. phies to Most Popular and Miss Photogenic, nicipal Auditorium, Wednesday, July 22, 8 p.m. of Miss USA and four runners-lip. Girl Friday, July 21, 8 Selection of Miss Universe. Municipal Auditorium, Saturday, July 25, 7 Coronation ball at Lafayetla Russ Shun L B. Urged as Base 'Price Plea for Namesake Ship on Berlin GENEVA Powers urged ovens the previous morning n preparation for the walk out. r OTHER PICKET lines were established early today at the U. S. Steel plants at Vernon and Maywood, al the Kniser filant at Montebcllo and at Bethlehem's Torrance factory. All arc fabricating plants, An official of the union said that steel workers will be off the job in Los Angeles and San Bernadino counties by tonight. The walkout shut off 90 prr cent of the country's s making capacity and threat- ened to slow down the entire U. S. economy, booming once -The Western t h o Soviet Union at the Big Four foreign ministers conference today to lower its price for an 18- month truce in the Berlin risis. Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko at once ejected live appeal. The 610 prisoners who did (Continued Page A-4, Col. 2) not take part in the rebellion returned to their normal jobs today. Scores of convicts went into two other mines operated by the prison. The Grace Northwood, Middlesex. Engliswoman is Mrs. Margaret Smith ATTORNEYS for the trust company representing Wast- inghouse's estate said he gave MEANWHILE, a high state official offered the rebels a! chance to air their complaints.! Pat Patterson, assistant cor- commissioner, re- mained overnight at the prison lo listen to individual griev- ances. He had refused to negotiate further until the  y a spurned suitor. A stale- vide police alarm was broad- cast for John Thompson, 22. cruiser. SPONGBERG SAID "the Long Bench Naval Shipyard is a cruiser shipyard. Also, most of the components that Imake the Long Beach a figlit- ing ship were engineered and Picture on Page A-16 Police dragged said T h o m p s o njbuill in Southern California, blonde Ann Piri down the stairway of her lome and kept members of ner family away by firing a shot from a deer rifle in their direction. 4 THE GIRL'S brother, aunt and grandmother watchet helplessly as Thompson drove off with her. A half hour earlier Thomp ncluding her missiles, radar and other essential gear. "There are many logical reasons for this move, but the most important is the intense pride that every one of the more than naval ship- yard workers has in Ihe Long Beach. Every job they per- form on her would be a labor of love to make her the queen of the fleet." SPO.N'GBERG THANKED son fired a shot through the living-room wall of his own home in Highland Park, Navy Department for Iroit suburb, police said. (naming the cruiser for Cali- Relativcs said Miss Piri largest city, gone out with Thompson onlyj uss Long Beach will c a proud ship and she bears a few times and did not wantii. to see him any more. SPANKING FOR A PRINCESS would be punished here, Mrs. Smith were engaged lo be married, and the engage- jtncnt was broken off by Mrs. 'Smith in November 1954. NEW YORK may be some time before the half- lThey wcre close and intimate million steclworkers out on strike feel the economic i friends and had known each pinch. Steel union officials may feel il sooner. Salaries of union officials, including that of Union iwas President David J. McDonald, who makes S50.000 a year, ;mattcr." stop as soon as a strike starts. iother for 17 years so that it THE CONVICTS starlcd the rebellion at the start of. the Monday day shift. They seized foremen Shirley Bunch, 63; Ben Davis, 37, and Earl Hens- ley, 57, and retreated deep into the mine shaft that runs fly-by-night more than a back jnto he Cumberland Mountains. STEELWORKERS ARE PAID on a delayed two-week basis. They have two weeks pay coming, with an ad- ditional two weeks of vacation pay, which at the average of a week comes lo about Also, they can also usually get credit in the steel towns for food and most other everyday necessities. The union does not pay strike benefits, but union funds are paid out lo meet emergency needs of strikers and their families. 4 Hurt as Passenger Train Rams Freight R O A N 0 K E, Va. WV-A passenger train crashed into the rear of a freight 10 miles south of here Tuesday nighl. Four passengers suffered minor injuries. The freight had stopped on a long grade. Low clouds late to- night and early Thurs- day, but mostly sunny and not much change in temperature. Maximum by noon today: 84. Her Highness Locks Out Maid, Pours Water on Staid Londoners LONDON W A Zulu princess got a spanking Tuesday night for shower- ing cups of water on bow- ler-hatted London business- men. Princess Elizabeth Alex- andra Agatha Dinizulu is 6 year old. Tuesday she was bored. She looked oul the win- dow of her mother's src- ond-story apartment in fashionable Jermyn St. and saw someone watering H windowbcot. The princess decided to do the same. But her win- dow sill held only a soli- tary plant in a solitary pot. So Elizabeth watered the people passing below, pai's- ing only tn lock out 'he maid. Startled businessmen got drenched, looked up, en- countered a melon-slice grin, hurried away. A crowd gathered on the other side of the-street. Two policemen arrived, hammered on the door and pleaded with Her Highness to desist. But the cup kept emptying tirelessly. Finally someone remem- bered Elizabeth's mother, fi- foot Princess Alexandra Al- bertini Palmer was with her atlrneys at the law courts. A phone call, and mother hurried home by cab, ending her daughter's five hours of fun. "Elizabeth will get a little Princess Alexandra announced. proud he said. "Long each, during its 60 years as home for the Pacific Fleet, as dedicated itself to the job f making the Navy man and is family proud lo call Long each their home. We are ratified to know that more lan 100.000 naval personnel nd dependents, both active nd retired, live in Long 3each and environs, and we re also gratified to learn that more requests are received for hore duly in Long Beach ban for any other naval shore acility." The vice mayor pointed out hat the city now is complete ng a navy landing n Long Beach and will break ground soon on a armed services YMCA. 'Our efforts to make our city an outstanding naval community are he said.   

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