Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: July 14, 1959 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Press Telegram

Location: Long Beach, California

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 14, 1959, Long Beach, California                             LAST-DITCH STEEL USS Long Beach, first HOME -T-' _. Fulfil -Cruiser, Christened LONG BEACH 12, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 1959 Vol. 139 PRICE 10 CENTS 32 PAGES EDITION TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 (Six Editions Daily) Hear Rebel Felons ibv-TraD Mine ride his bicycle The 7Zl-lool USS Long Beach iv.sn'1 Inuncl.ed but floated .n o jobs Reach 67 Million to Set Record w Em pjoyment surged to a recor high of in June. A gain of was built o strong factory hiring and sea sonal rises in farming and construction. The Labor Department re- po'rl thai unemployment rose simultaneously by as two million students and new graduates flooded the job market- number out of work JBtaled for Ihe month. a result unemploymenl remained at. 4.9 per cent of jrje civilian labor force, after allowing for seasonal fluctua tions. "BUT THE STEEP climb in gain of OXW since sol dom been matched in hislory It attested to the force of th business recovery, depart mcnt officials said. Factory workers' averag weekly earnings also reachc a record at The wor week lengthened to 40 hour and 36 minutes on the ave age, a longer work week tha in any June since 1955. The report issued today b Secretary of Labor James Mitchell stressed the Jun gain in factory jobs. The i crease was abnu do'iible the usual rise for 1 month- It pushed factory em- ployment to only below the pre-rcces- sfon level in mid-1957. MRS. CRAIG HOSMER, wife of the U. S. representative from Long Bcai ch IUBV.U. f I ISS I .nilP ,1CC t rtlin swings champagne bottle against 'bow of guided missile cruiser USS Long Beach at christening. Despite effort shown by Mrs. expression the bottle failed to break on the first swing. At left is Samuel Wakcman, man- ager of the Bethlehem Shipyard where ship was Wircphotos.) Navy, AEC and City Officials Among at Ship Ceremony Bargaining Remains at Stalemate Eisenhower Still Holds Hope of Averting Walkout NFAV YORK stce strike nt midnight loomed a most inevitably today wit union and industry negot ators going through the m lions of fruitless lasl-minu bargaining sessions. The chief industry ncgo ator, R. Conrad Cooper, sn there was no change in the bargaining stalemate. However, Cooper and Steel- workers Union president David J. McDonald kept talk- ing with fellow negotiators about a possible new contract They recessed lor lunch at p.m. anil planned to meet again at Cooper said the process of iclosing down the industry in advance of the expected mid- night walkout was already well along. IN WASHINGTON, Hie White Mouse said today Presi- dent Eisenhower still hopes the steel strike can be avert eel. Press Secretary James C. (Continued Page A-3, Col. G) Area Steel Tie-Up to Hit West to Press Reds on Precise Terms on Berlin Hostage Free but Convicts Still Hold 2 GENEVA (AP) Western foreign ministers re portcilly decided today that they need more definite assurances from the Soviet Union before they cat seriously consider accepting a Soviet-proposed Berln freeze. i" A U. S. spokesman said a] statement mndc by Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko at the Big Four meeting Monday actually "looks like a backward step." At that time Gromyko snid Russia docs not plan any .I unilateral action if the freeze ends without H more per mancnl settlement. 6 Injured os Reef Cor Leaps Rail LOS ANGELES (CNS) Metropolitan Transit Author- ity trolley jumped its tracks Assistant Secretary it ]cr, lhc downlown dcpol Stale Andrew H. Derdlng told reporters that Gromyko had offered clearer assurances in n public statement in Mos- cow June 28 when he said two and oday, crashing parked furniture coming to rest on a sidewalk. Some 1G passengers aboard cow June 28 when ne sum In effect the West would lose any of its rights In West Berlin by agreeing to the Soviet plan moratorium crisis. for an 18-month in the Berlin Under the plnn as spelled out by Gromyko, representa- for Wilmington nntl Son Pe dro, were shaken up when the streetcar careened wildl clown the 600 block of Sa Pedro St. for 150 feet. tives of East nnd West Ger- Prisoners Sain No Concessions in Negotiations PETROS, Tcnn. ions convicts reportedly, jooby-lrappcd a coal with dynamite at Brushy Mountain Stale Prison loday nnd refused to give up after releasing one of three hos- tages. Assistant Corrections Com- missioner Pat Patterson dis- cussed grievances with the .95 convict miners, and said; a spokesman telephoned to the mine entrance: "We've talked It over ajid we're not coming out, Stntc authorities said Jhirlcy Munch, the hostnge vho was released, said Ihe convict miners had booby- trapped the entrance with dynamite. The report was un- confirmed from any other source. CONVICT spokesmen made it clear, (hat they did nol inlcnd In harm any- many would spend ttic 18 icnths trying to formula for German unlfica- ion. If they failed lo agree, he problem would revert jack to the Bij> Four. Secretary of State Christian A. Hcrter conferred with his colleagues from f) r i I a i n, Trance and West Germany 'or 2 hours and 40 minutes in morning and afternoon ses- sions. A spokesman said they discussed "tactics for the re- mainder of the conference. After the morning session Five of the passengers were taken to Central Rcceiv- ing Hospital, but none nppnr enlly suffered serious in juries, police said. their release of Bunch, who said he was hav- ing chills. Woodrow Malhlcy, A white mnn serving u life term for murder from Hamilton Coun- ty acted as VERNON LAND, '1C. opcrn- chief spokesman for the group L_f n.irl f n I I T- A tor of the trolley, snid the nkcs failed as it left the rcelcar bridge and turned nth onto San Pedro St. By HARRY FULTON SUIT Wrllir QUINCY, na lion's first nuclear-powered ,the Navy William B. Frankc, Adm. Arleigh Burke, chief of naval operations; Vice Adm. G. Rickover, nuclear Rear Adm. the Officials of United Stee Workers Union said aboi Southland worker would he affected by a stce strike. Plants and workers involved include: U. S. Steel: Consolidated Western Steel Division, May- wood, Vernon plant, 600; Products Division, Los "May God bless her and all who go with her." The ultra-modern 200; Neilsen Pump Plunge Kills LBCC Yputh, 1 Hurt 'A Long Beach City College student was killed and his companion critically injured wftpn their small sports car wlent out of control on High- way 395, near Bishop, and plunged down a 150-foot em- bankment shortly after 7 p.m. Monday. Dead is Joseph McGinnis, 19. of Anaheim. Driver of the auto, James Leo Herrcll, 18. of Long Beach, is in critical condition at'-Northern Inyn Hospital, California Highway Patrol of- fipcrs in Bishop reported. Atomic tnergy described the mighly Mrs Craig Hosmcr to he armed with guided mis- wife of the Long Beach con silcs, as "a guarantee" (bailsman, broke the hcfore ihc ceremony Amr-rira will remain free. botlle ?hampaeneianrt Ihe vessel was to be ____ in a giant new building basin at the TJethlc- Ihcm Sleel Co.'s shipyard already was parlially "launched" as the christen- ing was performed. Yard workmen began pumping huge Works, Long Beach, 25. Kaiser Steel Co., Fontana, Columbia-Geneva Steel Di- vision, Torrance, 700 produc they accused Gromyko of oh structivc tactics and slowing down negotiations with hi: demand that F.ast and Wcs German representatives sit in on secret Dig Four talks. THEIR CHIEF immediate problem is what to do abou Gromyko.s unexpected bi< late Monday to win new svcst cm recognition for Commu nist East Germany. Herding said "no Inilinliv has yet been taken by th West on that subject." H mean that none of th western ministers has mud. an effort to gel the Sovlc nerica win remain irec. and tnc vessel was i Emphasizing the hisloricjover the bow of .he cruiser.I on nf 1 hp orrasion. "1 christen this ship the j 1nwPH in a nier foi importance of occasion. Atomic Energy Commission- er Harold S. Vance called the 721-foot, M.OOO-ton vessel a "forerunner" of the nation's nuclear powered surface Navy, and he said its con- struction is "direct evidence" USS Long she said. of nation's intent lo lion workers and office employes. These employes will be on Iwo-weck annual holiday until July 25. jand the vessel was to be Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Co.: V c r n n n plant, Tor ranee fabricating WHERE TO FIND IT Sen. Humphrey of Minne- sota tosses hal in ring for and lowed to a pier for out- filling. t HER FIRST skipper, who svill report soon for duly in connection with equipping the ship, will he Capl. Eu plant, ISO 4 IN FONTANA, an estimated foreign minister lo drop h rcquircmenl. German rcprcscntalives d not take part in any of In informal, secret sessions the first six weeks of t! conference. They sat in 1 formal meetings as adviser GROMYKO DECLARED UIIILll ft] 11 III I LIM I of four Negro nnd four white prisoners. Hut, Malhley said: "We ain't no ringleaders in Ihis. Myself, I couldn't be no inglcadcr. They elected us to Land, of 830 W. 1st SI., .in Pedro, pumped his cmcr- ency brakes hut was unable i halt the car. The operator said he blew come nut here and present our 1C nrn motorists nnd pcdcs- ians until he was thrown ut of the moiorman's scat. Land, an MTA operator or years, escaped in-i ury. The car came to rest gainst two furnilurc vans, nc side about six feet off the round. A passenger, tugboat opcr- ilor Lalo Ammcnti, 32, of San Francisco, said the trol- ey suddenly started rocking and he looked out the win- dow in time lo see the street grievances. THE BEST ANSWER Pat- terson could give to any o( a about B operator said he blew grievances was street's whistle to d scc abo qualified thai." Patterson told newsmen (Continued Page A-3, Col. 3) Navy Fires 1st Radiation Test Rocket POINT ARGUELLO (M After a delay of more than :ar narrowly mobile. miss an auto- LALO, who recently re turned from India, was taken to the receiving hospital with an injured right arm. Among those taken (o the hospital was Mrs. Mildred Wcijolo, 46, of 2168 Locust Ave., Long Beach, who suf- j T L.., Kaiser Steel Co wnrk- vas unjust lo exclude bruised right hip. iUlfl ----jtne Snip, Will UU l-u- Dcmocratic presidential p Wilkinson, a native maintain world leadership in the development and applica lion of atomic power for nav al propulsion. "A product of the missile and alomic age, this magnif- icent naval vessel with her two powerful nuclear engines will be free to travel the seas for unprecedented distances to highway pa- al j.igh rojmcn, Herrell, returning Commissioner Vance said "Her endurance and mobility will far outslrip her convcn from a trip to the High Sierra, 16st control of his Volkswag- en'on a curve, one-fourth mile north of the McGee Creek Division of Highways Main lenancr. Slalion. The Iwo youths were thrown out ol the car half-way down the 150-foot embankment. tional predecessors. She is the 'Nautilus' of our surface naval forces." MORE THAN per sons, including Secretary o inalion bul he shies away from California primary. Slory on Page A-2. Beach B-l. Hal fl-7. B-7. D-2 lo 7. C-6, 7. A-fl. B-3. Shipping D-2, C-l, 2, 3. C-5. Tides, TV, D-8. Vital D-2 B-7. B-4, S. Your A-2. Long Beach, who was Ihe irsl commander of Ihe atom submarine Nautilus. Recalling that many of Ihc d Yankee clippers were juill at Fore River Shipyards icrc at Quincy, Atomic En rgy Commissioner Vance ers jammed their union hall Monday night to hear strike Union administrator Harold Rasmussen called for an" or- derly strike, saying the union would nol tolerale any vio- lence or drunks on the pickci lines. He also urged slricl adherence to Ihe slrike dc.id Germans, and said this ciror of the opening six weeks should be corrected. Herter, Britain's Sclwyn Lloyd and French Foreign Minister Maurice Couvc de (Continued Page A-3, Col. 4) aid: "Jusl as those early hips were constructed to gain our freedom as a mari ime nation, the Long Beach a revolutionary naval vessel is being construclcd lo guar antce lhat this freedom is no destroyed." He said the nuclear-pow cred. cruiser will "pave the way" for Ihe nuclear-powered aircrafl carrier, Ihe 'Knler- (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1) jumping of the gun Weather- Mostly clear through Wednesday except for some night and early morning coastal low clouds. Not much change in temperature. Maxi- mum temperature by noon today: 78. Red Gunboats Shell Amoy Island Fortress TAIPEI, Formosa Defense Minisiry said Iwo Chinese Communist gunboats from the island fortress of Amoy loday shelled National- ist-held Tatan, 96-acre island near Qucmoy. A communique did not say how long Ihe aitack lasted or how many shells were fired This WHS the first gunboat at 'lack reported against Tatan 88 Listed Today for Tax Refunds The names of 88 more persons who have (ailed In recent years lo claim fed- eral Income-ttx refund checks from the Internal Revenue Service are listed In today's Press-Telegram. To see if your ap- ptars on thf "Forgotten Fortune" for In structlons on applying for the refund to Page D-l. H hours, ihc Navy loday fired a 21-fool rockel de- signed lo record radiation 150 miles high. The launching of the two- s I a g e Nike-Ask solid-fuel rocket appeared successful to observers on the ground. The firing, first of a series of 12 to sample X-ray, and cosmic radiation in the upper atmosphere during solar ares, was the first ballistic missile shot from this new nvy facility south of Van- enbcrg Air Force Base. THERE WERE no solar lares lo record today. In- ormation gathered by the rocket's 50 pounds of instru- ments will be used for corn- prison with data gained in aler shots, to be fired n 60 seconds after obscrva- ion of disturbances on the sun. Solar flares are natural ex- plosions on the sun's surface. They sometime cause black- outs" of radio and wire com- munications on esrth. The firing of the pounrt vehicle was originally set for 7 p.m. Monday hut loading of instalments took longer lhan expected and shot WRS postponed to today. .V   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication