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Press Telegram: Monday, July 13, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 13, 1959, Long Beach, California                             PIN HOPE ON RESEARCH Russ A an Broken Space So Do Parents Pholo by Chuck Sunittiulst STEVEN KEENEY PLAYS QUIETLY ON FLOOR Smiling Boy Unaware of the Heartache Around Him Six-year-old Steven heart. Broken on the inside by existed since birth. By BEN ZINSER Keeney is a hoy with a broken One Canine, Named Daring, Makes 4th Round-Trip Journey MOSCOW, MR The sians announced today that they rocketed two dogs into jspace Friday and brought them back to earth safely. One of the dogs in the ballistic rocket was Daring, the veteran space traveler, who.was up for his fourth round trip. Daring, another dog, Snow flake, and a rabbit named Marfooshka (Little Martha) ,were sent up in a similar sin gle-stage rocket weighing pounds on July 2. Tass, the official Soviet news agency, said instru- ments in both rockets were parachuted to earth after suc- cessfully making recordings of conditions in the outer1 atmosphere. THE RUSSIANS have not disclosed the distance or alti tude of either the July 10 or July 2 flights. The Tass announcement to- day said the latest dog-carry- ing rocket was the same type as that of July 2 and was launched at a.m. Friday. "Information is reported to lave been obtained on the en- tire range of the research pro- Tass said. THE AGENCY described this program as including "measurements of infra-red radiation of the earth and the earth's atmosphere, photo- graphing of clouds over a vast territory, a simultaneous an- IKE APPEAL REVIVES STALLED STEEL TALKS HOME Soulhland't Finest Evening Newtpapcr LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, JULY Vol. 138 PRICE 10 CENTS 36 PAGES TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 CLASSIFIED HE EDITION (Six Editions Daily) a physical defect that has Broken on the outside by surgeons who recently took a look inside to see if they could help. (Note: They couldn't.) Steven's parents are Mr. and Mrs. George J. Keeney, 1601 Keever PI. The boy's father is a City Gas Department employe. His mother, Frances, is president of the city's Heart Guild. if if THEIR HEARTS are broken, too. Broken, yet filled with hope and prayer. alysis of the ion and neutral composition of the atmos- phere and a measurement of .he elctrostatic fields." The July 2 shoot, the Rus- sians said, gained valuable in- formation on the composition of light gases such as hydro- gen and helium in the outer atmosphere, ultraviolet rays, micrometeor showers and di- rection and speed of air cur- FAME SEEKERS ON THEIR WAY Thirteen foreign entrants and one U. S. beauty who'll compete in the Miss Universe Beauty Pageant start- ing here this week pose in New York Sunday. From left are Peggy Bnvich, Miss Holland; Signdur Thpr- valdsdottir Miss Iceland; Pamela Anne Searle, Miss England; Rina Issacov, Miss Israel; Arlene Ncsbitt, Miss New York- Lis Stolberg, Miss Denmark; Jornnn Kristiansen, Miss Norway; Cnrmcla Miss Germany Christine Spatzicr, Miss Austria; Francoisc Saint-Laurent, Miss France; Marie Louise Ekslrom, Miss Sweden; Zuzanna Cembrowska, Miss Poland; Maria Bucella, Miss Italy; and Ezel Olcay, Miss Tur- key The annual beauty pageant begins Thursday. Story and additional pictures B-l and Photo.) Strike Due for Tuesday at Midnight Industry Chief Sees Little Hope, Attacks Union NEW YORK Stalled steel negotiations got under way again today at White House bidding but with scant prospect of an agreement to avert a strike at midnight Tuesday. The union promised to make "an all-Arnerican try" at negotiating a strike-saving settlement. R. Conrad Cooper, chief industry negotiator, threw cold water on settlement prospects and showed irrita- tion in posing with Union president David J. McDonald for photographers. COOPER SAID there was only one possible way a strike could be the union to again extend its contract. McDonald, however, ruled out any further delay in a showdown. The union earlier had granted a two-week truce but it expires at midnight Tuesday. Cooper said the union al- ready has caused (he industry injury by the fact that many inns have had to close down some facilities in the costly reparation for an orderly ndustry shutdown. "We're not the aggressors in the Cooper said. "We're not causing a strike." This is Ihe story of little Steven Keency's how medical science is racing against lime in an effort lo' save it. i X When Steven was years old he turned blue around the mouth for the first lime. A year later the same thing happened. i if if if STEVEN STARTED running temperatures, At 3 his tonsils were removed. Doclors continued to look and listen. Mostly they listened to his heart. "Steven was always sick when he was young" says Frances Keeney. Three years ago the Keeneys took Steven to a specialist. A heart specialist. rents at various levels. All Held in Mine by Convicts PETROS, Tenn. Con- victs in Brushy Mountain State Prison coal mine seized ________ three mine foremen today and sorts of tests were made. A heart-sound machine are holding them hostage, Big Union USS Long Beach Plot Bared Set for Launching jby Lawyer WASHING TON A (Continued Page A-8, Col. 1) West Urges Secrecy for Berlin Solution GENEVA West called today for imme- diate resort to secret diplomacy in the second round of the Big Four conference here in an effort to shelve the Berlin crisis and clear the way for a summit confer- New York lawyer testified today he was approached by officials of the West Coast iVarden Frank Llewellyn said. The warden said 116 con- Longshoremen s Union about By HARRY FULTON illfl WrMer QUINCY, past will shake hands with the future when the USS Long Beach, the nation's first nuclear-powered surface vessel, is officially named and launched here Tuesday. Carrying on a custom that has existed for almost 180 years, Mrs. Craig Hosmcr, wife of the congressman, will christen the guided-missilc cruiser by breaking n _._._ Will lliu victs in the mine released oncia plan to seize control OI[ bollic of over the bow. foreman, Tom Jones, whojcourt-appointed monitors po- brought out word about the sizure. Llewellyn i d e n t i ficd Ihe men being held as Ben Davis, Shirley Bunch and Earl Hens- ley. Blasts Rip Mine Shut in Labor Row LA FOLLETTE, Tcnn. Four dynamite explosions to- U. S. Secretary of State Christian A. Herter told Rus- sia the United States hopes for sufficient East-West agree ment at Geneva to warrant a heads of government meeting. He said the best way to seek this agreement would be in small private meeting o: the foreign ministers begin ning Tuesday. His recommen- not armed. day wrecked mining equip-, ._ ment at the White Oak Coalition was promptly endorsed, Morley. ieiby Forei-gn Sccretary "THE PRISONERS seized the men about two hours aft- er they went to work in the mine this Llewel- yn said. "So far we don't know what they the warden went on. "There has been no com- plaint and we haven't had any trouble in the mines before." The prison operates three coal mines in the Cumberland Mountains which produce coal for state institutions. The warden said that so far as he knows the prisoners are icing Ihe Teamslcrs Union. Barlley C. Crum lold the Senate Rackets Committee that the idea was to pave the way for a merger of Ihe Iwo unions into a single, powerful transport union. Keystone of the plan, Crum said, involved inducing God frey P. Schmidt to resign from the board of monitors and be replaced by Crum in hat post. t CRUM SAID Ihe approach :o him came from thc long- shoremen's president, Harry Lloyd of Britain and French Foreign M i n i s t e Corp. mine at miles north of here. U. R. Arnold, operator of Couve De Murville. the mine, said the blasts heavily damaged two power shovels, a bulldozer, a fuel truck, a fuel "The foremen go into the Bridges, and Bridges' top aid, Louis Goldblatt, rather than directly from any Teamster official. Crum said the offer came fo him in a series of meetings over the past year. ,he prisoners Schmidt has resigned, and d French armed Llewellyn said.jtoday Lawrence T. Smith, r New York attorne w tank and other equipment. He estimated the loss at about No one was injured. Arnold said he had not at- tempted to operate the mine AT THE SAME time Herter ed off a western drive to get Andrei A. Gromyko to give precise assurances that if the a ,.Their job js lo make safetyiNew York attorney, was hecks." I sworn in to replace him. CASE OF THE SUNKEN LOCOMOTIVES West accepted a Soviet mora- torium plan for easing the Berlin crisis western rights in Berlin would not be impaired. Gromyko, Soviet foreign minister, renewed since his contract with proposal for an 18-month sus- pension of the Soviet threat (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1) United Mine Workers Union expired March 14 Three previous dynamitings and numerous incidents of sniping and coal-dumping have been reported in thc area since the UMW began in March trying to organize nonunion coal operations and to rrnew contracts with some firms. The UMW has denied any part in thc violence. Weather- Low clouds and fog late tonight and early Tuesday near the coast, but mostly clear and sunny. Little change In temperature. HOWEVER, THE 721-fool, warship will not be "launched" in the traditional manner. She will not slip down sliding ways and take to the water with a mighty splash, as has been traditional for centuries at launchings. Bethlehem Steel Co.'s Quincy Shipyard has wntlcn a new chaplcr in maritime history by building America's first atomic surface warship in a newly constructed graving basin. Covering 10 acres and silting -SO feet below thc general level of the yard, the basin merely will be flooded lo "launch" the Long Beach. The flooding process will be started hours before the christening, and thc nuclear warship will be floated from the basin on the evening tide and towed inlo one of Ihe yard's outfilling docks. if if if ACTUALLY, the custom of holding ceremonies at ship launchings dales back to early times. Its origin was perhaps inspired by superstition and It, in effect, repre- sents making sacrifices to ill fortune, saying, "Take this and let our ship alone." The Babylonians, according to ancient history, used to sacrifice two oxen at each launching, and Icelandic sagas tell of thc custom of "roller reddening" at which (Continued Page A-3, Col. 3) NEGOTIATIONS collapsed Sunday night. President Ei- senhower this morning ap- pealed to both sides to re- sume talks in a last-ditch peace effort. The White House said there vas still time to reach a icaceful agreement. Union IMiicf McDonald agreed with his. But Cooper told newsmen is he went inlo session with McDonald Hint thc time now is loo short to deal with the many unresolved problems. "Frantic last minute dra- matics are not responsive to the long-term seriousness of to a police station to dcnyl (Continued Page A-3, Col. 2) charges by his former wife; that he sliuck her and tried1 p to run over her with his Jj sporls car. 1 The boxer appeared with! his attorney and manager, Paul Caruso, at the station lo deny the accusations by his wife. Aragon showed scralchcs on his neck n n d Art Aragon Booked in Car Attack HOLLYWOOD U P I) Boxer Art (Golden Boy) Arn- gon was hooked on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon today when he went left arm and a torn white shirt, lie said his wife struck him with a shoe. MRS. GEORG1NA ARA GON, 30, said the boxer came to her house in North Holly- wood lo see their three chil- dren late Sunday. She said Aragbn had a woman with him in his blue convertible. as Fire Razes Home MOUNT CLEMENS, Mich, pl Five young children ere killed today in a fire that swept a two-story frame home near downtown Mount Clemens. Two of the children were dead on arrival at a hospital. Bodies of three others were found in their bedrooms. The victims were children of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lang- "I told him he wasn't The falner had left for come around to the house Lork at thc General Motors Three Sail Off Open Drawbridge NAPA Southern Pacific Railroad had a king-size water problem to- day: How to get three 186- ton locomotives out of the Kapa River. The locomotives plunged into 35 feet of water Sun- day off a drawbridge, opened to allow a boat to pass. The 24-foot fishing boat was nicked, but on train or ser- iously hurt. What happened? Still a mystery, railroad officials said. And the an- swer can't be learned until the huge engines, valued at total, are lifted. Then speed tapes can be checked, said Donald Mil- ler, assistant superintendent of SP's western division. The three locomotives were pulling a caboose when they sailed off the Brazos railroad bridge six miles south of here. The cab.oose snagged on a coupling and hung above the water. Four members of the train crew leaped off. A fifth stayed with the ca- boose. "I opened the bridge and all at once the engines were going by. They shouldn't have done said bridgetender Gabc Clark. 36, of Napa. Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Pitt- sley, also of Napa, agreed. "I happened to glance up and here's a locomotive falling on my Pitt- sley said. The Pitlsleys were bruised. Three feet of the boat's bow shattered. Tax Refund Checks Still Await Many Federal Income-tax re- fund checks await hundreds of Long Beach area persons who have failed to claim refunds for some particular year. The Press-Telegram to- day begins Its fifth week of publishing the names of persons. Turn Jo Page A-4 to see If your name Is on today's list. with a girl Mrs. Ara gon said. Aragon, 31, jumped out of the car and grabbed her, she said. Me struck her several times, knocking her to the ground. Mrs. Aragon said. She said the boxer threatened to kill her. jumped inlo his car and tried to run over her while she was on the ground but she rolled out of the way, she told police. IN A CRIME REPORT filed with police Mrs. charged the boxer got out ol thc car again and started to strike her some more before she ran into the house to cal police. Aragon, divorced by his wife in January, denied strik ing the woman. "She's Aragon said I never struck her. On thi contrary, she hit me. Thosi are my three kids and 1 havi visitation rirjhls but she neve lets me see them or even tal' to them on the phone." tech center in nearby Warren when the fire broke out. The mother and children were still asleep. The mother, Margaret, 26, and 8-year-old Deborah, suf- fered fractured legs and back njurics when they leaped a second floor window. WHERE TO FIND IT What is the missile-age lole f the Strategic Air Com- mand? Series by military edi- or 'James A. Allen starts on 3ageB-l. Beach B-l. Hal A-ll. A-I1. D-2 to 7. 7. A-18. Shipping 84. C-l to S. B-4. Tides, TV, A-ll. 7.   

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