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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: July 11, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 11, 1959, Long Beach, California                             SUSPECT ARSON IN HOLLYWOOD FIRE FREES fAMILY, POLICEMAN Banker Kills 1 Bandit, Scalds, Wounds Pal ECLECTIC, Ala.   A .courageous small-town liank- er, angered because two ban- dits threatened to kill him and. his .family, shot one to death and seriously wounded the other to foil a bank rob- bery here today. The banker', 31 -year -old Carl Ray Barker; his preg- nant wife and 3-year-old daughter, had been held host- age for about ah hour before he subdued one of the holdup i men by throwing scalding wa- ter in his face and beating i him on the head with the robber's own pistol. Earlier the bandits kid- naped a pgliceman and robbed a bank of i i BARKER, general, manager of the Bank of Eclectic, killed one of the robbers about 2 a.m. with a shotgun charge in the chest. He seriously wounded the other, who had received the hot water treat- ment, with a like charge in the hip. The dead man was identi- fied by papers in his wallet as James Franklin Bray, 24, son of a Montgomery night- SMALL-TOWN BANKER Gftrl Ray Barker (right) ne Vol. 137 18 PAGES Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HES-USI HOME EDITION Six Editions Daily) Massed Men, 100-Degree Sizzler Due Again Today Residents Warned to Restrict Work Where Possible Long Beach residents swel tered in another scorcher to day. The'U. S. Weather Burea predicted that before the da is over, the mercury wi climb to 100 degrees. Friday was the hottest da of the ciownlow and at Municipal Airpor Thermometers climbed to high of 104 in Lakewood. watchman. His companion William D. Hayward, 26, an ex-convict, was taken to the Kilby Prison hospital in Mont- gomery in serious condition. Hayward has a criminal rec- ord dating back to 1950 when he was sent to Kilby for five years for two cases.of bur- glary and grand larceny and burglary in Montgomery County. He had two escapes from Kilby and another year sentence for burglary and grand larceny in Mont- gomery County in. 1953. THE TWO MEN kidnaped 'city policeman Maxie Taun- lon after to, drive them out on a highway where they could hitchhike a ride "I don't mind telling you was scared to Taun ton said. "I kept saying little (Continude Page A-3, Col. 1) foilcd j- holdup early today when he kilted one bandit and wounded another in his home at Eclec- tic, Ala. Policeman Maxie Taunton also was held hostage by the (AP Wirepholo) _ Ship in Collision, Sinks; 3 Missing DOVER, England 680-ton British coastal ship St. Ronan was reported sunk in the English Chan- nel today, after a collision in a fog with a vessel identi- fied as the Mount Athos. Three of the St. Ronan's FRIDAY NIGHT'S low was not very low. The coolest it got was 68 degrees. By 7 a.m. today it was 75. U was 80 at 9 a.m. Later this morning the temperature reached 83. It dropped back to 81 at 11 a.m. In Los Angeles the tem- perature streaked up to 103 Friday, marking the hottest July day there since July 4, 1907. Nearly every Southland community reported 100-plus temperatures. It hit 114 de SHE LOST HER HOUSE Halt Blaze 9 Persons Burned; 28 Homes Burn and 15 Damaged HOLLYWOOD WV-Twen- ty-eight homes are known de- stroyed in a pos- sibly touched off by an arson- ist, which swept through acres Friday in Holly- wood's rustic Laurel Canyon. Fifteen other homes were damaged. Three hundred per- sons were forced to flee for their lives. Most of the homes were in the to class. Seven firemen were injured trying to save them. A wom- an resident and her son suf- fere burns running from their home as flames raced dowa upon it. It was destroyed. A family in a 1959 auto barely escaped when the driv- er, blinded by smoke, drove off the road. The occupants fled on foot. Flames caught the car moments later and set it afire. THE BLAZE broke out in two different places on Laur- el Canyon Blvd. and flared up minutes later a mile away on Mulhollrmd fire- men to suspect a firebug. Mulholland crosses Laurel Canyon Blvd., like the cross on a T, at the ridgeline nf the Hollywood Hills. The flames spread from Lookout Moun- tain Dr. north through hills crew were reporter! missing. Coast -said' seven members of the SI. Ronan .crew were picked up after the crash. They added that the vessel's skipper was badly injured. A Mount Athos is listed in grees in Reseda, 110 in Wood- land Hills and Arcadia, 108 in Van Nuys and San Bernard! no, 107 in Riverside and Sun land, 105 in Pasadena, 104 in Bujbank.. v Lloyds Register as a Greek vessel weighing tons. SEATTLE (ffi p. V HF K rl U U jt IUIIL ui MUI ILL km mil j A dazed Miss Veronica Simons walks down Willow Glen Rd. in the Laurel and canyons crossed by two Canyon area looking for her house, It was one of.more than a score destroyed doMnjirccis. Friday in a hrush fire which raged through Under-dry trees. A fire hose lies me on the road.below remains of several burned-out houses. Wircplioto) _ equipment halted the Herter Pessimistic on Geneva Take-Off (toot iisnmg o L iiuim WASHINGTON of State ChristianUmeridan off the south end A. Herter took off today for the Big Four talks at ment with the Soviet Union on the problems of Ger-' ln the many and Berlin." members of .a San Diego, Calif., fishing vessel were rescued from Huget Sound waters this morning when their crafts was rammed apd sunk by a seagoing tug. Coast Guard headquarters said the tug Charles collided at about 1 a.m. with the 79- foot fishing boat North AMONG THE cooler spots were San Pedro with 92, Big Four crewlBcar Lake with M and NeW' foQl Coasl Guard port with 82. At least five persons col- Continued Page A-3, Col. 8) 3 Children Die in Resort Fire LAUDERDALE, Wis. Three children died early today when flames swepl strough a summer cottage ir this small southeastern Wis consin resort community. Tour of U. S, by Kozlov Ends Today PITTSBURGH R. Kozlov's barnstorming tour of the United States comes to an end today. The Soviet first deputy pre mier flies to New York's La Guardia airport this afternoon after a brief stop in this in- dustrial city for a look at the Homestead district works of the United States Steel Corp., and a visit to the nuclear power plant at Shippingport, Pa. j cutter attempted to get a line But, Herter said, he has "no aboard the sinking vessel but great expectations for sue- failed and the North Ameri- cess" and that bargaining can1 slipped below the surface, with the Soviets requires "in- Attempts were under way to finite patience labor." Herter spoke at and tonglocate the wreck. The crew members, Andrews of whom suffered apy ill cf Air Force Base, Md, near feels from the were The weary Kremlin leader cut more than half a day from his Pittsburgh stay to permit him to rest in New York be- fore taking .off by Soviet jet transport for Moscow early Monday morning. The last scheduled public event of his; tour will be a news confer- ence Sunday in New York. rtir Dciac, niu., Washington, just before soar- identified as A. K. Anderson, ing away at a.m. in a the skipper, San Diego; brand new jet plane, a giant Archie Beaucin. Chula Vista military version of the Boeing Carlo Margett San Diego, 707 airliner. It was one of and Raymond Damelson, San three bought for President Diego. Eisenhower and other top of- ficials. Herter's flight is the WHERE TO FIND IT first official use of the new1 craft. AIDS SAID the U. S. for-j eign affairs chief was not rul- ing out the possibility of least a temporary agreement on the cold war crisis issue at the second round of the for- e i g n ministers conference Jeffrey Jackson, 7; his sis ters, Jackie, 11, and Angela 14, died in the flames, The were the children of Mr. an Mrs. W. T. Jackson Jr. of Ge neva, III. Sheriff's deputies said Don nie Mcl.aughlin, about 1! Chicago, a baby sitter for th Jackson children, escape but was hospitalized wit Steel Man Sees No Pact- Hope NEW YORK steel idustry said today it saw no ossibility of a contract greement lo avert a strike t midnight next Tuesday. In announcing this, R. Con- ad Cooper, chief industry ne- otiator, said there was no ther recourse but to notify teel firms later today to be- gin shutting down. After an hour-long negoti- session with the Steel- vorkers Union, Cooper said, '1 regret to announce we sec no possibility of an agree- ment." Cooper said no further nc goliating session was schcd ulcd with Union Presiden David J. McDonald until Sun day morning, "but the out look for an agreement is no hopeful." DART AT AIRLINER, VANISH Such an agreement could pave (Continued Page A-3, Col. 5) A-4, 5. Death B-3. B-3 to 9. B-2. A-2. A-8. Shipping A-3. 7, 8. A-2. Tides, TV, B-I8. Vital B-IO Soviets Deny Nixon Trans-Siberia Permit Plastic Boq Placed on Bed, Kite Baby INDEPENDENCE An 8-month-old boy smothered Friday night in plastic bag that had been placed over the corner of hi bed. The victim, Doug Hileman NEW YORK Rus- sians have refused Vice Presi- dent Richard M. Nixon per some Siberian cities which it selects, Warner whether he will said, out travel to dent Richard M. Nixon jp hjs own piane or a mission to fly across Siberia soviet ajrcraft is still subject in an American plane on his visit to the Soviet Union, the New York Herald Tribune said today. Nixon, who is going to Moscow later this month to open the U.S. Exhibition waa found dead at the to.return home across of Mrs. Sara Hileman, hisjsiberia by way of Alaska, 'he grandmother, who was keep- Tribune's Washington corrc- ing him while his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hileman, were on a vacation the Lake of the Ozarks. spondent James E. Warner .id. The Kremlin will permit t h e vice president to visit to negotiations. THE RUSSIANS have long barred foreigners from the Siberian Pacific coastline an- the interior of thst region bordering on Copimunis 'China. An aid to Nixon, about the reported Russia See Mystery Lights SAN FRANCISCO Pan American Airways pilot reported that a group of extremely bright lights ap preached his airliner at high speed over the Pacific early today before suddenly veering away. Four other transpacific airliner pilots also reported sighting the unidentified objects. A Pan American spokesman here said the first report came from Capt. George Wilson, commander of a DC7C Clipper en route from San Francisco to Honolulu, at 6.20 a.m., P.d.t. "THEY WERE EXTREMELY BRIGHT lights, surround- ed by small Wilson said. "They approached us at approximately feet altitude. They were closmg .n rapidly. The objects then headed south. After about 10 seconds all of the lights disappeared." He said the phenomena occurred at a. m., P.d.t. He was about 840 miles from Honolulu at the lime. Shortly after this report, two other Pan American pilots radioed that they had seen the same thing. Capt. Noble Sprunger, bound from Los Angeles to Honolulu, re- ported seeing the objects at 6 a. m., a little farther lo the south from Wilson's position. FIGHTING THE BLAZE Fire fighters are framed by smoke from the roar- ing brush 'fire Friday in Laurel Canyon hear Holly- wood as they fight the blaze in heat well over the Wirephoto) _________ _ Two Northern Calif. Blazes Uncontrolled Two forest By AsioclliiS Prtsi fires burned out of control today in hollnnd. North of it lay thick brush on the downslopes fac- ing the communities of the San Fernando Valley. t t STEVE MCQUEEN, of tele- vision's "Wonted Dead or helped battle flames that crept within a few him- (Continued Page A-3, Col. 2) Pacifist Son of Solon Sent to Jail OMAHA A pacifist demonstration against a. mis- sile base site has brought a six-months federal jail sen- tence to the 22-year-old son of a Vermont congressman. Sentenced to serve the six months, and to pay a fine of was Karl H. Meyer. His father is Rep. William H. Meyer, Democrat serving his first term in the House and a member of the House For- eign Relations Committee. YOUNG MEYER was tirst arrested last week when he and four other pacifists at- tempted to enter the Mead, Neb., missile site. __He was charged_with tre.s- pnssing and was sentenced lo the Jail term and fined. But the sentence and tine were suspended by Federal Judge Richard E. Robinson on condition Meyer stay from the site. Friday Meyer went back to Mead with two others of his group. He was immediate- ly arrested and brought back before Judge Robinson. The other two, Hiram C. Hilbridgc, Evanston, and Lawrence L. Shum, Seattle, Wash., were held on bond for action, said that so far a he knew, the question of ft; ing across Siberia stilt was i the discussion stage. i Yvly JIJJCS m.i w Northern California. Another was checked. Every- ia court appearance next where the situation was critical. ______REP. on, said he was fully aware of his son's activities and in sympathy with Karl's desire or world peace. He recalled that Karl had been arrested three times in New York, being Jailed twice and once given suspended sentence, for .protesting New York State compulsory More than 300 acres of( slash timber and brush workaround 150 acres of burning -'brush and timber. The-blaze was corralled only miles from Boulder Creek. The area will be patrolled for at least three days. Ranger Lee Gum said a high tension dropping because of the heat, shori circuited on a tree. p in smoke 15 miles west of Garberville in southwest Hum- County. The 115 men on the line bucked 20-mile- an-hour north winds. No one ould say whtfn the blaze would be controlled. THE OTHER PAN AMERICAN pilot who sighted the object was Capt. E. G. Kelley, who departed San Fran- cisco for Honolulu a half hour ahead of Wilson, at p. m. (P.d.t.) Friday. The Pan Am spokesman here said dispatchers here heard pilots of. a Canadian Pacific Airlines airliner and a Slick Airways cargo plane also reported seeing the ob- jects. All were bound for Honolulu. ANOTHER FIRE in steep, inaccessible coastal covmtry burned more than 300 acres :rlday in Sonoma County This one required !50 men hopeful of bringing it unde control sometime today, In Santa .Cruz County, th small community of Boulde Creek was threatened bcfor control lines were A total of 225 men worked on the lines. Northern Call [ornia the report was: treacherous fire weather of the season." In'national forest lands, all hands were held on standby compliance with civil drills law. Weather Mostly sunny through Sunday. Continued hot but slightly cooler Sun- day afternoon.   

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