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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - July 7, 1959, Long Beach, California                             ROUT FELONS, 38 HOSTAGES FREED HOME The Finett Evntmg Neuttpaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., TUESDAY, JULY Vol. IXXIt-No. 133 PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 5-im 32 PAGES CLASSIFIED HE EDITION (Six Editions Daily) MltS.; VERNA CLEMENTS, :her eyes smarting with tear gas, is calmed by hospi- David O. Nbrdtfom (upper fight) as she holds her two children, 'iFrankie Diane, 3, after being freed from four 3-Hour Siege MONROE, Wash. Thirty-eight hostages held for terror-filled hours by four-kiil-crazy young convicts were freed without harm ac state reformatory today in a surprise tear-gas attack. officers carried ou the: rescue at a.m., two hours before the third ant latest deadline set by the re volting prisoners. Reforma tory officials said it wen "like clockwork." The rebels, who had arme themselves with butche knives and long forks in th kitchen Monday afternoon i the abortive escape attempi threatened violence only t the three guards held hostage :QNE OF THE GUARD HUgh said after th that the desperadoe the officers to star pfrtyihg because they woul out of the windo1 dead if the demands for frei dom were not met. 'Twenty-four visitors, man of-ihem women and children other prisoners wh visiting relative along with th guards. .One woman was release frbnj-the barricaded visitor roortT'during the night whe she.-jbecame ill.. The othe held until the uprisin ended. All outsiders and th 11 fhostage inmates we treated fairly well. The four rebels were quic ty.-.subdued as the tear gi sent: the occupants stumblin (Continued Page A-2, Col. 3 ,N OFFICER'S finger points to freedom for Mrs. Roy Cranmore and her son, Daniel, 3, frightened and tense after being held hostage at Washington State Wirephoto.) Royal Yacht Leaves n v Chicago for Canada By HELM AN MORIN has been an unforgettable CHICAGO day." Openly thrilled, with a smile like a sunburst, Queen Elizabeth said goodby to Chicago'Monday night after 13 exciting-hour's amid of cheering millions and one of the triumphs of her life. She is resuming her tour of Canada with Prince Philip :oday, heading north aboard the royal yacht, Britannia, for Saulte Ste. Marie, Ontario. They will be on the yacht until noon Wednesday. Nats Defeat American All-Stars 5-4 Triple by Mays Sends Aaron Home for Winning Run PITTSBURGH UP) Willie MaysM remendous triple scored Hank Aaron with the winning run in the eighth in- ning today as the National League edged the American League 5-4 in a thrilling, see saw All-Star Game at Forbes Field. The San Francisco slug- ger's clout over Harvey Kuenn's head in right center climaxed a two-run rally by the Nationals off left-hander Whitey Ford of the New York Yankees who started the eighth. It overcame a three run splurge by the American Leaguers over unbeaten El- roy Face (12-0) of Pittsburgh in the top of the eighth in- ning. Ken Boycr of St. Louis, pinch hitting for Johnny An- tonelli of San Francisco, started the big inning with n single to left center. Dick Groat of Pittsburgh sacrificed Boyer to second. Then Aaron, thumper, bounced a single into left center to score Boyer with the tying run. Mays followed with his triple to the 438- fopt sign in right center. Don Elston of the Chicago Cubs nibbed out the Ameri- cans with in the ninth nning but it was a icnse fi- nale as both Nellie Fox of :he Chicago White Sox and Kueen narrowly missed hom- ers on balls that went foul. Rattlesnake Bites Tot in Rolling Hills ROLLING HILLS A 19- month-old boy was in critical condition today after he .was bitten by a rattlesnake while playing in the back yard of his home here. The child, George King, was struck on the right hand as he romped by his home at 4325 Via Frascati. The Donna scream, find the boy's King, heard Mrs. him She rushed fang marks out to on his hand and his arm swelling rapidly. t t SHE RUSHED the young- ster to a doctor's office, from where he was taken to San Pedro Community Hospital. The wound was treated and the boy was given anlivenom Ike Vetoes Housing Bill as Inflation Omnibus Measure Criticized; Action Rapped by Johnson WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower today vetoed the omnibus housing bill, cull- ing it extravagant and infla- tionary. Senate Democratic leader. Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas promptly accused Eisenhower of taking an ill- advised, politically partisan course. Johnson left the way open for an efforl to override the veto. He asked that the Presi- dent's message he held for further consideration of whal he called Eisenhower's "all or 16 ADVENTURERS SAFE Frenzied Search of Colorado River serum. Sheriff's bors and deputies, neigh- county firemen searched the area for the rep- tile, but failed to find it. The child is the son of Robert I. King, consulting engineer. BUT THE ECHOES of Chi- cago will not soon die away. The city gave her a warm, generous, typically American reception. And it was a case of mutual admiration. Elizabeth quickly caught the spirit of the crowds. She smiled. She began Lt. WILLIAM McKELVHE tells how he led moves .that broke up rebellion by fpur knife-wielding con- .victs. "When they told me they would roll out'my .officers McKeivie said, "I knew we had to move in anrf take Wirephoto.) AMERICAN Irsl pilch FIRST INNING ..J Mlnoso lo Mays In _. Kaltae struck oul. No runs, no llnoso drove Oryidale'i In deep Icll ills, no errors, none ielt. NATIONA' Mathew: right IONAL filed to vs IFneo a homer Inlo th lletd stands. Aaron sin Kallne. he lower uck out. Kllltbrew's shorl fir. Aoarlclo Marhews Moulded to Skowron. Aaron lined to Aparlco. No runs, no hits, no errors, wave with genuine feeling. e kept turning to Philip, latting and laughing, as the under of the applause pur- ued them through the streets. "We shall carry with us on le next stage of our journey, nd for many years to come, memory of the generous ospit'ality of Chicago which ill long warm our IB said. THESE WERE, her words s she rose to speak to 1.40C uests at Mayor. Richarc !aley's banquet in her honor he last event on her lon( rograrh. She was a glittering igure in white with a dia- mond and emerald tiara in her heslnut hair. "My husband and 1 thank most sincerely for the ouching welcome you have ;iven she said. Her voice, usually high- ilched and girlish, glowed .vith feeling. Once again an explosion of applause rose around the Queen! Commissioner of Police imothy J. O'Connor calcu- ated that two million per- (Continued Page A-3, Col. 5) rlol- ____ ______ _____ _____ ___ speared Mays' liner back of the box. One ru.i. one no errors, none left. SECOND INNING AMERICAN Skowron mounded out, Temple to Cepeda. Colavllo struck out. Trlandos pooped out. No runs, no Wli. no errors, none Felt. doubled. Aparlclo back to short tell center lo make a back-to-the plate calch of Ce- petfa's high flyr Banks holding second. hlgl wall ------......jked. -Crandall and Drvsdale went down on strikes. No runs, one hK no errors, two leFI. THIRD INNINC came In down iwlnglno Wvnn wi rns, no hlls. no trron, fill lo Mini I Brown Raps Collegewide Parking Fees SACRAMENTO Gov Edmund G. Brown strongly objected today to a propostt to charge state college stu- dents a parking fee whether or not they have a car. He called it wrong in prin- ciple and an indirect increase in tuition fees for the esti- mated students. Slate college presidents, meeting here last week, rec- ommended a charge for full-time students, for part-time students and SI6 for nothing attitude." "1 do not believe this kind of attitude will appeal to rea- sonable men and the Senate. t HE ADDED he did not be- lieve that after members have had time for reflection it would appeal "to even one third of the Senate." A two-thirds majority in each the Senate and House would be necessary to over ride the veto. Eisenhower asked Congress to produce a less costly meas- ure. In a special message to the none lefl. Cclavl FOURTH INNINO Burdclle ol tee went to the fonali. Tempfe mound for Mllwau- Iht Na- ._. .._ threw oyt Mlnoio. Fox lauled to Mathewi. Kallne smashed 3-2 pitch over (Tie left IFeFd wall for home run, tying the icore at 1-1. SVo ron and CoUvlto slnoled. Aaron made tint running calch ot Trlendoi' kxio drive. One run. three hllr no errors. Rytie Durtn of York look over Iht olfchlng for the Americans. Mays strucV oul. Banks walked. Aparfcfo cobbled UD Ctpedl's sharp grounder. stepped on second lo force Banks whlpoed It To Skowron for a double plav. faculty and staff members. THESCHEDULE is subject to approval by Roy E. Simp- son, superintendent of public nstruction. Brown agreed there should c a charge against those who own cars, but that if he had anything to say about it, the others wouldn't have to pay. Banks threw to oul KIM- Dyrer, struck oul. No rum, no hrts. no errors llruck oul. Kllle brew threw twl Cranrfall. Burdette slruck (Continued Page A-4, Col. 3) Bridegroom Cashes in as Missing Heir JuU wtwri he some extra money most, bridegroom Pete Safe, 2C, spotted name hi The Telegram's Ikt of persons due federal income-tax It .WM a timely bonanza for Sib, of 415 E. Mh St., who wed Christina Brown on .Saturday. For today's list of "For- gotten Fortune" turn to Page C-4. Weather- Low clouds late to- night and early Wednes- day, but mostly sunny Wednesday. Little change in temperature. disappointment that. Congress had sent him a hill "so exces- sive in the spending it pro- poses, and so defective in other respects, that it would do far more damage than good." 4 HIS MESSAGE attacked several key provisions of the measure, in eluding: 1. What he termed an cessive 900-million-do 11 ar, two-year urban renewal pro gram. 2. The authorization for public housing units while previously au- thorized subsidized dwellings remain unbuilt. 3. Direct federal loans for housing for the elderly. Eis- enhower salt} this need can be met by federal insurance of private loans. But Eisenhower made infla- tion his basic objection to the measure. The bill's orig Senate, Eisenhower expressed HEAVILY', BEARDED Phil -SedeyL 42, and Jessie, 41, touched off the search Monday for rest of the pnrty of 16 boating on Colorado River. The Scelcys were halted in Cataract Canyon when their boat overturned twice. Other boaters later turned up Wirephoto.) The governor noted that 3oth Simpson and the Board of Education were independ- ent of his office so there was nothing he could do except point his views. Brown told his news con- HANKSVIU-E, Utnh The party was getting rough wet, loo so as couples sometimes do, Mr. Phillip J. Seeley decided to bow out and catch another ride. It wasn't exactly like thumbing a ride on a super- highway. It set off a frenzied rescue effort in the depths of Cata- ract Canyon for the Seeleys And it caused the organiza- tion of a hig search by mili- tary and civilian planes for companions who went on and foughl the Colorado River's toughest rapids to a sl-nd still. inal heavy cost in .loans grants and outlays had been drastically reduced by Demo, crats in Congress in hope of avoiding a veto. THIS WAS the fourth ma ference it will be his policy j0r veto by the President this not to simply veto Iegisla-jscssj0n. It leaves up in the tion. a number of major nous- All hills not signed by theijng programs for which fed governor by July 23 are au- tomatically vetoed. Brown said, however, he will indicate in advance the measures opposes and the reasons. he oral funds are running short. An Eisenhower veto never has been ovrriden in the Pres- (Continued Page A-3, Col. 4) DETROIT EXECUTIVES GREET RUSSIAN Kozlov Welcomed Warmly Despife Snub From Mayor REUNITED in Hanksvillc Monday night, the amateur rivers runners laughed off the experts' fears they had been lost forever in the the way an elderly Callfornlan was last May. Trouble? None worth men- ioning. Fun? Thrilling, just thrill- Do it again? You bet. Even he Seeleys. Then why did the Bakers ield, Calif., couple go ashore and wait lo lifted out of he canyon by a helicopter? said Seeley, "I saw (Continued Page A-2, Col. 6) Seawall Plan Gets Council OK City Council today voted 5-3 to seek approval of State Lands Commission for tidelands funds to construct a Naples-type seawall from 55th PI. to 69th Pi. The Council took the action following a four-hour public hearing last Tuesday. Favoring the seawall wers Councllmen Lewis Reese, William Dalessi, Charles Dooley, Virgil Spongberg arid Mayor Raymond C. Kealer.; Opposing were Councilman Charles Garrison', D. Pat Ahem and Robert Crow. DETROIT (ffl Indus- trial Detroit today gave Russia's First Deputy Pre- mier Frol Kozlov the treat- ment usually accorded heads of slate. Kozlov was warmly wel- comed by business execu- tives despite a snub from the city's mayor. On a fore- noon tour there were no un- friendly demonstrations. At the Ford Motor' Co., Kozlov was greeted by the president, 'Henry Ford If, and the board chairman, Er- nest R. Breech. Ford remarked that it was "good to talk things over." Kozlov replied: "Al! questions can be re- solved by negotiations." Kozlov asked Ford about production and rord said it was way up over a year ago. 'The economy of our country is going ahead very Ford said. "Business is very good." Ford personally showed Kozlov the company's new "Levacar." Kozlov refused to get into car that rides on air because he in- sisted that Ford get in with him. The bubble top ex- perimental model holds only one passenger. A company guide demon- strated the car which floats on a thin layer of air.' Kozlov asked Ford to let him know when he gets into production on the new cars. He said: "It would save us money in Russia. We ,would not have to build roads for them." Earlier Kozlov loured the Detroit Edison River Rouge power plant. COUNCILMAN Gerald Desmond, who last week in- dicated he would oppose the wall, was absent. The proposal to build the seawall, which would elim- inate surf-type swimming in the area, aroused a furious controversy on the Alamitos Bay Peninsula. The wall would be con- structed approximately 30 feet out from the existing wall, which protects private WHERE TO FIND IT Gov. Long is back in his capita! ,and ready to take over, but his strength may bJ ebbing. Story Page A-5. property against flooding. It would be filled in with sand, and the proposal is to allow swimming from floats that would anchored to the foot of the wall at various points. Beach Page B-i. Hal Page B-7. Page B-7. Classified Page D-J to 7. Comics Page C-4, 5. Crossword Page C-8. Page B-2. Page B-4. Financial Page B-S. Shipping Page D-2, C-l to 4. C-7. Temperatures A-7. TV, Page D-8. B-7. B-4, 5. Ycur A-2. 3-SCENT RIDE ROM K Rose, h Bus, Twain to TOKYO UP> Tokyo's public transport system is going to try perfume to ease the ordeal of commut- ing in sticky summer heat Six hundred streetcars and about half the city't supply, are going to carry- perfumed bouquets during the evening rush hour. Tha .scent will be mixture of lily, jasmine and rose.   

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