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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: June 29, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - June 29, 1959, Long Beach, California                             TOLL 17 IN RAILROAD-BUTANE BLAST AT DOWNTOWN HALL Gang Slashes, Beats Guesfs at LB. Nuptials A .wedding ended in a bottle-throwing, chair-bust- ing brawl here early Sun- day morning after a gang crashed the parly. At least two persons went to private physicians for treatment of their injuries. Mrs. Ardell P. Gallego, 19, of 12141 Nava St., Nor- walk, was hit in the back of the head and her left hand was severely cut by a broken boer boHle. Mrs. Sally Remijio, 31, cf 18738 Jersey Ave., Ar- tcsia, suffered a possibly broken nose when she was hit by a chair. 4 3 tt THE WEDDING PARTY was dancing in Morgan Hall, 8th St. and Locust Ave., when a gang of hood- lums crashed in, according to reports to police. A fight started and lasted for about 45 min- utes, according to Salva- tore S. Lo Presti, North Hollywood. Mrs. Remijio's husband, John, said he also was hit 'with a chair and knocked one of his assailants un- conscious. As he sought to leave the hall with his wife, the gang formed two lines at the doorway and he had to fight his way through. THE RINGLEADER of the gang was described as being in his 20s, tall, and had a cast on his right arm between his wrist and his elbow. The gang reportedly came from Wilmington. Police did not list the names of the bride and groom. Woman Sees Slayer With Binoculars L. A. Wife-Killer Buries Clues in Desert, Arrested ACTON, Calif. wife of a retired gardener saw a man stop his car near her ranch home on this lonely stretch of desert "where noth- ing ever happens." 'I went into the house and got my Mrs. Martha Schulze.said Sunday. "I saw him bury something, but 1 didn't know what it was." "Let's go up and see what he Mrs. Schulze told er husband, Charles, 76. he said, "let's go hopping first. What's buried here will stay there." WHEN THEY returned rom a shopping trip to Palm- dale, Mrs. Schulze and a neighbor walked to the spot Court Upsets Ban on 'Chattei-ley1 Film WASHINGTON Supreme Court today struck down the New York state movie censorship law as unconstitutional. Tlie ruling set aside a ban on the film, "Lady Chat- terley.'s Lover." All nine justices agreed in holding that the ban on "Lady Chatterley's Lover" was improper. However, four justices saic he court moved too swiftly n striking down the Nev York law. They were Justices Harlan, Whittaker, Clark am Frankfurter. Courf Hits Security in Plants WA S HI NGTON Supreme Court ruled today there is no present authority for the far-flung industrial se curily program which screens civilian workers in private plants holding defense con- tracts. The program covers three million workers in various parts of the country. They must meet government secur- ity standards to look at clas sified information. Without such clearance some are use less to their employers and are dismissed. Chief Justice Warren deliv ered the court's decision. Jus tice Clark was the only out right dissenter. V JUSTICE HAR LAN and Justice Frankfurter cacl SMOKE POURS from wrecked train and wooden trestle near Mel- driiri, Ga., Sunday after two tank cars of butane gas exploded. A huge sheet of flame swept across' a fishing and recreational area below the tracks, killing at least 19 Wirephoto.) Justice Stewart delivers he court's main opinion. SPEAKING OF the York law, Stewart said: "What New York has done is to prevent the exhibi- .ion of a motion picture he- cause that picture advocates an adultery under certain circumstances may be proper behavior. Yet the h'irst Amendment's basic guarantee is of freedom to HOME EDITION The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., MONDAY, JUNE 29, 1959 32 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TKUKPIIOM; HEs-iioi Vol. 126 (Six Editions Daily] CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 MRS. 1NA MOSER Body Found and dug up a woman's purse and shoes. Then Mrs. Schulze called police, The purse belonged to Mrs. Ina Huebner Mosher, 38, who five month ago married Ger- ald Mosher, an oil field worker. Police found Mosher, 43, asleep in a hotel room in San Fernando: Officers said Mosh- U1 "V er told them, between -sobs, advocate ideas. The quite simply, has thus struck at the very heart of constitu- tionally protected liberties." The movie is based on a novel by D. 11. Lawrence, first, published in 1928. The story concerns intimacies be- tween a high-born English- woman and a caretaker on her husband's estate. A RECENT action, the wife Saturday in a fit of jealousy. "She said she wanted to go back to a former boy police quoted Mosher, who was booked on suspicion of murder. MOSHER TOLD police he loaded his wife's body in his car and drove aimlessly for IN _____ Post Office Department'several hours. Then he banned from the mails neal' Mrs- Schulze's opinions agree newly published unexpur-''lome ana< buried the purse ing with the result but ex- plaining some differences in their views from those of Harlfln and Whittaker joined in Frankfurter's opin- ion. The decision was given on an appeal by William L. Greene, who formerly made S18.000 a year as a vice pres- ident of Engineering and Re- search Corp. in Riverdale, Md. The firm had a Navy contract, o IN APRIL 1953 the Navy revoked Greene's clearance and the firm discharged him The Navy based its action on findings which included that Greene had associated with Communist party members and Communist spies. Warren's opinion said that Hie decision of the majority was only that "in the absence of explicit authorization from cither the President or Con gress, the respondents (Navy officials) were not empowered to deprive Greene of his job in a proceeding in which he was not afforded the safe guards of confrontation ant cross-examination." Liberals Select Rhee to Run for 4th Term SEOUL, Korea ruling Liberal Party toda; nominated President Syng man Rhee to run next yea for his fourth successiv term. Rhee -promptly ac ccpted. The 84-year-old chief ex eculive named Lee Ki Poong Assembly speaker, ac his run ning mate. ated edition of the book. and shoes. As to the movie, Stewart "I didn't know what I was oted an argument was made lat the state's ustified on grounds the film Arms Deal Imperils Ben-Gurion JERUSALEM, Israel (UPI) bitter controversy over the sale of Israeli arms to West Germany threatened to force the resignation of Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion today. Sources close to the 74- year-old premier, who has guided this infant nation since its birth, said he was determined to quit the gov- ernment and politics unless h e coalition government sacked the arms deal. The critical decision was expected to come at a cabinet meeting and subsequent ses- sion of Parliament this after- noon. Ultimately it could affect Israel's position as a staunch supporter of NATO. THE CRISIS arose when a West German magazine dis- closed Israel was selling 000 grenade throwers to the West German army. Ministers of the leftist Adhut Avoda and Mapam parties objected. Ben-Gurion's Mapai Party has a majority in REFUND LIST IN 3RD WEEK Thousands to Go- So Keep Checking The Press-Telegram today begins its third week of pub- lishing "Forgotten Fortune" heirs. Thousands of persons, whose lasl known address was in the Long Beach area and who have federal income tax refund checks coming, will be listed between now and Aug. 12. Knesset Then, they said, he led them stormy five-hour session of the cabinet Sunday railed from the car along a private to resolve the issue. Continued Page A-4, Col. 5) road near San Fernando. CURIOUS WOMAN HELPS SOLVE SLAYING Martha Schulze, 73, shows how she watched through her binoculars as a man stopped his car near her Acton home and buried something beside tlie road. Mrs. Schulze and a neighbor later dug up a woman's purse and shoes. Their report to police led to arrest of a slaying Wirephoto.) INSTRUCTIONS If your name appears in today's list, DO NOT Internal Revenue Service (Refund Dept.) 312 N. Spring St. Los Angeles, Calif. Write a letter provid- ing enough information to properly identify your- self as the person to whom a check has been issued but never de- livered. The information should include the ap- proximate amount you believe is owed to you, your Social Security number, an old bill or statement giving the name and address the IRS last had for you and, if possible, a carbon copy of your return. Also give the year un- der which your name ap- pears in the lists. ARMOUR, A 1954 John E., 12120 Hermosa Ave., Norwalk. B 1952-1953 Stroll Jars N. Y. Police Crews Hunt More Bodies From River Flaming Death Sprays Fun Area Bene'ath Trestle NEW YORK first deputy premier of Russia, Frol R. Kozlov, took a walk the vast dismay of pomp-minded police officials. Passing up arrangements for an elaborate motorcade across town, Kozlov at the last minute set off afoot on the one-mile hike between his country's diplomatic head- quarters and the Coliseum where a Russian cultural and BJORKLUND, Charles E., 1 scientific exhibition is being Rocking Horse Lane, Roll ing Hills. B1VIANS, Ray A., 18815 Hawthorne, Torrance. BIXLER, Guy R., 11964 At- lantic Ave., Lynwood. BLANCHARD, J. T. S. L 826B Alamitos, Long Beach. jBLASSINGAME, M. C. I., 13232 Anzac, Compton. IBLAS, c. L., soi w. io2nd I St., Santa Ana. (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) Brown OKs Workmen's Benefits Hike SACRAMENTO ation boosting workmen's compensation was signed to- day by Gov. Edmund G, Jrown, who endorsed the bill after its terms were worked out by labor and manage- ment negotiators. It raises maximum tempo rary disability benefits from ;50 to SG5 a week, pcrma lent disability indemnity rom S40 to S52.SO a week and total death benefit frorr to THE BILL by Assembly man Robert W. Crown (D Alameda) also increased the death benefit for a widow with one or more minor chil dren from to and the burial expense allow ance from S-100 to S600. Weather- Cloudy tonight and early Tuesday, but sun- ny Tuesday afternoon. Little change in tempera- ture. jVlaxinuim tempera- dire by noon today: 73. Top Salute for Queen in Toronto TORONTO Queen .lizabeth II received the big gesl, noisiest reception of he Canadian tour on her arrival n Toronto today. More than people overflowed a temporary ;randsland erected on the )ier where (he royal yacht Iritannia tied up. Several thousand others were stanri- ng around a huge enclosure. In the harbor, hundreds of loafs, large and small, were ined up. Flags and streamers fluttered from masts and rig- ?ing. As the Britannia ap- proached, she blew three deep-throated blasts and the harbor become a bedlam ol noise as the small craft re- sponded. It was a warm sunshiny morning. After a reception on the usual red carpet on the dock the Queen and her husband, Prince Philip, set out on a tightly-knit program that will not end until 10 p.m. held. A dozen aids accompanied lim while surprised police brass hustled along as es- cort. THE GROUP circled with- out incident from Park Ave. and 68th St., where the So- viet United Nations delega- :ion resides, through Central Park to the exhibit hall at 60th St. and Broadway. Kozlov arrived from Russia Sunday to preside at the opening tonight. President Eisenhower flew here today (o get a preview of the display, The affable, gray-hairet the No. 3 man in the go to Washington Tuesday to talk with Eisenhower and Secre tary of State Christian A Herter. MELDRIM, Ga. aster teams stepped up opera- tions at the swirling Ogee- chee River today, searching or more victims of a freak utane gas explosion on a eaboard air line frieight ain. Seventeen known dead ave been counted since the id-afternoon blast Sunday :nt a blanket of-flame over ome 175 persons in a rec- eation area below a river restle the train was crossing. Duplications set the figure t 19 earlier but an Asso- ated Press check of all hos- ilals and funeral homes in earby vic- nis were .17, ncluding two children who ied today. All have been denlified. The' Red Cross Iso listed 17 dead and said t had received .only two calls oncerning missing persons. MANY MORE were in- ured in the fiery catastrophe nd Savannah hospitals still ad 13 persons receiving reatment. Memorial Hospital aid five of its patients were n poor to extremely poor :ohdition. Disaster units began drag- ;ing operations at the scene near this hamlet 20 miles northwest of Savannah and (Continued Page A-4, Col. 2) House Extends War Tax Rates WASHINGTON (M Th' House passed and sent to th Senate today a compromis tax extension bill continuin for another year Korean war time tax rates on corporalio income and on cars, alcohol! beverages and cigarettes. Th Senate took it up at once. Congress must send the bi to the White House bcfor midnight Tuesday, when th rates expire, to avert a rev enue loss of three billion do lars a year. WHERE TO FIND IT Nixon committee says Congress must take three immediate steps to control inflation. Story on A-3. Beach B-l. Hal B-7. B-7. D-2 to 7. C-6, 7. A-4. B-6. Shipping D-l. C-l, 2, 3, 4, C-5. Tides, TV, D-8. Vital C-8, B-7. B-4, 5. Your A-2. Hoffa's Son Makes Plea for Tight Against Evil1 rN. H. Governor Named to U. S, Post WASHINGTON Lane Dwinelf, Republican former governor of New Hampshire, was nominated by President Eisenhower today to be as sistant secretary of state for administration. MAC1NAC ISLAND, Mich. must get out and fight what is James P. Hoffr., 17, whose father, James R., is president of the Teamsters Union, told a sum- mit meeting of the Moral Re- armament Movement Sunday. "We must talcc MRA to America and: the young Hoffa told delegates whose organization urges ab- solute morality in all deal- ings. "When I came to Mackinac didn't realize the great struggle going on in tha he said. "We have a false sense of security ,.in. America. People in America must be made aware that here communisrn is right insido our country. We are being soft-soaped into recognition, of Red China and trade with the Communist countries." Young H o f f a was gradu- ated from Cooley High School in Detroit this spring.   

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