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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: June 6, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - June 6, 1959, Long Beach, California                             SELECTED FOR ANNAPOLIS L B. Boy Hits Perfect Score in National Math An 18-year-old St. Anthony High School senior, who reads comic books for relaxation, has, accomplished the next to impossible. Robert Nickerson, 119 Grand Ave., made a perfect score of 800 on the advanced mathematics achievement test of the National College En- trance Board examinations. He took the news casually. "When I made up my mind to take it, I thought 1 might really be snowed he said. "But it wasn't as rough as I though it would be." tt i THE TEENAGER had trou- ble with one problem, passed it up, then returned to it when he had some time left. In taking the examination, he had the choice of the ad- vanced or intermediate math- ematics sections. The ad- vanced involved trigonometry and analytical geometry. In- termediate dealt with algebra and plane geometry. "I decided on advanced be- cause 1 thought, if I passed 1 would have a better'chance of getting into Annapolis." 3 a V! THE "BETTER CHANCE'1 materialized with announce- ment this week that Robert was one of 40 youths selected throughout the nation for ap- pointment by President Eisen- hower to the Naval Academy in Maryland. The appointment gives the Long Beach youth the oppor- tunity he wants to follow in the career footsteps of a fa- ther whom he cannot person- ally remember. Robert was just a little over a year old when Navy Lt. David G. Nickerson was killed aboard the destroyer USS Cushion in a sea battle off Guadalcanal. ROBERT'S MOTHER, Mrs.1 Elizabeth Nickerson, w i t hi whom he lives, approves of the choice. "She said it made her quite happy and that I should do whatever I thought best." Robert has thought the ROBERT NICKERSON, St. Anthony High senior, likes a comic book and glass of milk for relaxation! but in the field of mathematics he's a genius. (AP) OMAHA BEACH CEREMONIES 15th Anniversary of D-Day Marked OMAHA BEACH, France a French military leaders gathered at this RED BLOCKADE THREAT CHILLS BIG PARLEY HOME The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., SATURDAY, JUNE 6, 1959 Vol. 107 22 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) beach today to pay tribute to the men who died mak-j ing it the first foothold of freedom in France during Nicaragua Envoy Tells 50 Threats Atlas ICBM Blows Up in New Firing Missile Explodes After Apparent Smooth Blast-off CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. A streamlined new] model of the Atlas intercon- tinental ballistic missile ex- ploded today about three min- utes after launching. It was the third time in as many tries that a new "D" series Atlas had blown up shortly after blast-off. The "D" rocket is a prototype of the operational missile chat the Air Force hopes to turn over to troops this summer. World War II, Fifteen years ago was D- Today's Atlas made an ap- nay, the start of the great smooth at lied assault on Hitler's announced tic wall. Omaha Beach then about 15 minutes later that LOS ANGELES Nic-i was a chaotic tangle of land- ing craft, tanks, howitzers, ammunition crates, jeeps and struggling men of the 1st and American Infantry divi- "Navy best" since he was a ara8ua's Angeles consul says he's received more than 50 telephone calls and a )et- "little kid." Scholastically, Robert heads his class with an A-minus average and has been a mem- ber o( the California Scholar- ship Federation eight semes- ters.-_ ter threatening death if he didn't resign his post. "I have been in the diplo- matic service since 1930, working for the people of Imy said Ro ATHLETICALLY, he hasiberto Membreno, 59, battle sions. They faced merciless pounding from well-dug-in German positions. Before the beachhead was secured, more than Americans, B r i t a i n s and Canadians were killed or wounded. i THE ONLY signs of that the missile "exploded after completion of the initial pro- pulsion phase of its flight. Cause of the malfunction is not available." AN ATTEMPT to fire an- other Vanguard satellite into space is expected in about two weeks. The first stage of a Van- guard satellite launching ve- hicle was static-tested here Friday. Usually, a second stage static-test follows in a I participated in intramural bas ketball and volleyball. Outside of the school cur- riculum, he has been vice president of the Mountain (Continued Page A-3, Col. 2) MILLION Auditor Misses Error now are the: :'ew a launch- now this is what I get. 1 crumbling fortifications of don't know is not a political position." He asked for police pro- tection Friday. POLICE ARE studying the !case to determine whether it i should be turned over to the Hitler's Festung Europa, half- hidden by sand drifts and the white crosses that mark ing in another 10 days or two weeks. Vanguard satellites I and l[ were placed in orbit by the 70 CHILDREN IN 2 ROOMS Mrs. Barbarajean Backman, 18, tells how she and sailor husband, Edward, 21, kept 10 children and 2 dogs in 2-room San Diego apartment. "We love wasn't she said after pleading innocent to charge of endangering children. Only one of 10 was hers; she took in others to add to Pholo) Racer Roars Through Air, Rams Crowd 26 Hurt; Driver's Son, 2 Others in Critical Condition ST. JOSEPH, Mo. A speeding race car hurtlec upside down into a screamin] crowd Friday night, injuring 26 persons, including the driv er's son, who was in critica condition. Twenty-one persons were hospitalized. Three were or the critical list today in Miss ouri Methodist Hospital which admitted 13 victims Eight others were in St. Jo seph Hospital. Several may have beei saved from being crushed b> the car when a man grabbed one wheel and somehow man aged to hold on and even lif it a bit while victims weri pulled out from under it. ALBERT M. NIEDF.I., the driver, escaped injury. He was unaware his son, Ronny Lee 8, had been in the crowd ant injured by his modified stocl Tough Red Line Brings Mew Gloom Commies Assert They'll Prevent W. Berlin Entry GENEVA (UPI) Com- munist talk of a new block- ade of Berlin today chilled western diplomats at the deadlocked foreign ministers' conference, which is seeking a peaceful solution of the di- vided city's problems. Communist propagandists frequently threaten to inter- fere with traffic between Ber- lin and the West, but today's threat was the most ominous and the most specific since the foreign ministers' talks began. The diplomat swere alarmed not so much by the specific racing Betty, him. The friend car until his wife rushed up and tolc son of a persona of Niedel also wa (Continued Page A-3, Col. 1) iFBI. It is a violation of fed-! stad, and Brig. Gen C Co- law to mail death threats.! burn Smith, U. S. military at- Membreno turned over a tache in Pnri. letter, written in English'senior American' officers at- which warned: "Resign your ipnHint, Big tache in Paris, were the "Resign your post in <18 hours or you will be dead." WASHINGTON mil- lion-dollar error in an Air Force contract went right by the Air Force's auditor gen- eral. It wasn't discovered until a year later, when Congress' General Accounting Office went over the contract. House investigators lis- tened to the story Friday in open awe. mut- tered Chairman F. Edward Hebert (D-l.a) of the Armed Forces Investigations subcom- mittee. The contract was with Avco Manufactur- ing Corp., Crosley Division. Cincinnati, Ohio. It was forj fire control systems in the B52'bomber. THE ERROR came when? extra components, which be- longed to another contract! and had been accounted for in it, were mistakenly charged; to the control systems con-i tract. When the error was discov- ered, Avco immediately ac- knowledged the mistake and refunded the money. It said was sorry and would tight- en up its own procedures. GAO witnesses said the Air Force auditor general, who has an office at the Crosley plant, did not catch the mis- take. Rep. William E. Hess said it was obvious that a reason- ably alert supervision of the contract would have caught the error, Weather- Low clouds coastal sections tonight and Sun- day morning but mostly sunny Sunday. Litfle temperature change. the cemetery. A delegation of U. S. Na- tional Guardsmen and a U. S. Army honor guard were join- ing French troops in a salute to the dead. SOME OF THE relatives of the fallen American soldiers and veterans of the battle also were present. Among them was Cpl. Theo- dore Liska of Chicago, now on active duty with the Army in Paris, who came to the chalky bluffs overlooking his- toric Omaha Beach Friday so i he could be alone with his ;remembrances of the fateful I Liska has kept that lonely ivigil every year since 1944. Sgt. Donald Duquette of Negaunne, Mich., now sla- jtioned in Germany, brought jhis wife Mary and his three jchildren to share his memories ;of the beach. Duquette recalls that 30 of closest friends were killed :by German fire in 15 minutes. i "I guess this is one of the things that was shooting at jus." he said, leaning on the rusting snout of a German 88- millimeter anti-tank gun that poked from the ruins of a pillbox. NOMINATED James Henry Wakelin Jr., scientist and re- search expert of Princeton, N. .1., was nominated hy Presi- dent Eisenhower today to hccome assistant secretary of the Navy. Wirephoto) WHERE TO FIND IT A-4, 5. 4 to II. B-2. B-12. Death B-4. B-3. Shipping B-4, A-8, 9. A-6. Tides, TV, B-12. Vital B-4. One Killed in Ky. Mine Strike Row HAZARD, Ky. coal miner was killed and a nonunion truck driver wound ed Friday in two separate mounted to 48 today, policejup a mystery as deep and baffling as any recorded incidents in eastern the St. Laurent U. S. two successes in ninejM STERY OF AR tary Cemetery. Vanguard firings. Both are Gen. Leon W. Johnson, air stil1 circling the earth, deputy to Allied Supreme! Commander Gen. Lauris Nor- Train Collision Deaths Reach 48 SAO PAULO, Brazil The death toll in the collision of two commuter trains here Sahara May Hold Crash Secret WASHINGTON By GEOFFREY GOULD The Sahara Desert has cast said. The state hospital, Das Ule annnls of the sea. Clinicas, where most of the 100 injured were taken, said A World War II B24 bomber which had a crew of iuu iiiiui cu vrci e icmcll. fcdlU i i e the total dead may rise to 60. nllle has been found m the waterless waste of Libya, Police said the collision Fri-i380 miles soutl1 of Bengazi. It was last seen 16 years ago when it took off from a Libyan base for a bombing day night occurred when a signalman gave a green light to both trains running on raid on Naples, Italy. The bomber lies there on the the same track in sand, preserved almost ite directions. 'perfectly in the hot, arid of'. hundred sniper bullets whis tied from the hills at nearby Sassafras into a group o about 15 truckers unloading at the nonunion Joe Romeo Coal ramp. Wounded twice was Chester Blair, 20. The fatal shooting hap pened two miles west of Sas started to walk out to civili-jsafras near the Kodak Coa zation, surely they in Perry County, have taken all available water! State police said four men with them. If they had becnjbegan shooting at nonunion crewmen wno flew off on that mission in 1943. No Clothing, no written records. t WATER UOTTLES, pre-: sumably tightly capped, were; found still filled in the cabin of the plane. Had the crew crash-Linded in the desert PRINCE GREETS FIANCEE Prince Albert of Belgium, brother of King Baii- douin, greets his fiancee, Princess Paola Ruffo di Calabria of Italy, on her arrival in Brussels Friday from Rose for wedding to be held July desert air. Although its fuse- lage was snapped in two at the tail, the plane appears Kentucky's strike-torn c o a fields. The miner, Bobby Jenkin. Jr., 25, was shot by a stat trooper attempting to arres him for shooting at anothe nonunion trucker. The killing was the thirc in the bitter strike over Unit ed Mine Workers demands fo: undamaged otherwise, its ra- a 19150 contract, dio still is in working order. There is not a trace of the EARLIER FRIDAY severa James Maggard when to thfjhe parked his coal truck at a wouldjgrocery store at Kodak. I Maggard was hauling coa Did the crew all bail a firni operated by Stamp somewhere rise, as the Pen'a ier Collins, a leader in re sistance of about opera in the landin; caused so little damagi plane, their remains there. (Continued Page A-3, Col. 5) CHOOSES FINE Either Way, She's Headed Into Jail DETROIT S50 or serve 10 days in county Traffic Judge George threat linked with West Germany's plan to hold a presidential election in Ber- by the mere mention of a blockade while diplo- matic talks are in progress. BERLIN DISPATCHES re- porting the new communist tough talk reached here shortly before the ministers assembled foreign for se- cret talks at Foreign Secre- tary Selwyn Lloyd's villa. British spokesman Peter Hall, speaking for the Big Four, said the two-hour ses- gon thinks is likely? Then how did the plane fly on for hundreds' of miles to let down in -a soft landing in the des- ert? And wny apparenrly did none of the crew survive? Ruford L. Moore of Ports- mouth, Ohio, father of one of the crewmen, said he re- ceived a letter in 194G from the War Department saying the plane was returning from the bombing mission when it lost radio contact with its base and was presumed down in the Mediterranean. Did the crew bail out over the sea for some reason while the plane flew on safely to the south? THE PENTAGON identified the plane from its serial num- bers. It released Friday night the names of the crewmen and their next of kin. In spite of the passage of time, relatives of all nine (Continued Page A-3, Col. 8) tors to union's demands. COLLINS SAID he and his employes blocked the road so the snipers who at Maggard could not get away, then called state police. Police said when two troop- ers approached the group Jenkins fired one piste' shot K Threatens New Oases for Rockets LONDON Nikita Khrushchev declared today Soviet rocket bases will be set up in Albania and Bulgaria unless the Balkans are turned into a "rocket-free, non- atomic zone under mutual control." The Soviet premier, ad- dressing a big Moscow rally after flying home from a visit to Albania and Hungary, said the bases would cover any rocket sites that Italy and Greece allow on their terri- tory. It was Khrushchev's first mention of Bulgaria as a pos- sible base for Soviet missiles although he has previously threatened to establish them in Albania. Khrushchev said any attack on Albania would be an attack on the Soviet Union itself. T. Murphy told Mrs. Hassle them, turned and ran Dole, who had pleaded guil- !for the hills, ty to a drunk-driving They chased him, they said, charge, 'and Jenkins tired five more "I'll pay the she shots at them from ths dark replied, "I have to get back ened hillside. Otic of the offi- to work." cers fired back at the pistol Mrs. Dole is a matron at flashes and Jenkins was the county jail. wounded fatally. Car Falls Into Lake; Man Killed, Girl Lives ABINGDOiY, Va. W) A car carrying a young couple swerved off a southwest Vir- ginia cliff Friday and plunged ISO feet into a lake. Stephen L. Dickerson, 19, of Bristol, Tenn. was killed. His companion, Laura Gray, 28, also of Bristol, freed her- self and swam to shore, The auto sank in 15 feet of water in South Holston Lake, eight miles south of here.   

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