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Press Telegram: Friday, June 5, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - June 5, 1959, Long Beach, California                             HERO FORCED TO IDENTIFY SELF IN CORONA DEL MAR Conrad Picked Up as 'Tramp by Policeman LOS ANGELES grandfather Max Cr.ri.-nrl hero Thursday when he set a light-piano record from Africa to picked up uj u early today. "I don't blame that the lanky, graying San Franciscan said. "I guess I looked like a tramp, or like 1 had been drinking too much." Conrad, 56, said it happened alongside Pacific Coast Hwy. in Corona Del Mar, where he spent the a swank hotel. "I find it's best not to sleep or eat very much after a long the professional plane-ferryer explained. "If I sleep an hour or so, then get up and walk, I find 1 can snap out of my fatigue much faster. "I had a peach and cottage cheese salad about 9 p.m., lay down in my room for a couple of hours with my clothes, then got up to walk the salad off. "I had crossed the were no cars com- this policeman drove up and asked what I was doing wandering around at 3 o'clock in the morning. "He was a little tough at first. Told me to get into his car and asked if I had any identification. "All I had was my pilot's license. He said, 'A guy by that name just made a long flight. Are you related to J said, 'I happen to be him.' So then we had about a half hour of visiting. He wanted to talk about aviation. But I didn't feel up to much talking so I did more walking, went to bed and got up about 7 o'clock." "I'm caught up he said. "I feel fine." After officials checked his sealed gasoline tank to verify he hadn't refueled en route, Conrad planned to take off for his San Francisco home some time today in the same plane. Conrad said in Los Angeles he learned on his record non-stop flight that: "Mint tea makes me ill." He said it with a grin Thursday but it was no joke, he admitted, when he took a swig of the tea and. became nauseated over a lonely expanse of ocean near Cuba. "I didn't take any a thermos of coffee and said Conrad, who makes his living delivering air- planes around the world. "The Arabs put mint in the tea and it became rancid. Boy, I was sick." But Conrad recovered and piloted the single engine light plane into Los Angeles, via Corpus Christ! and El Paso, Tex., and Phoenix, Ariz. "I had 18 gallons of gas left and 1 could have made it to San he said. "But I heard everyone was waiting for me in L. A., so I came on in." The first thing Conrad did after taxiing his little plane across the expanse of runway was ask for a drink o( water. "Oh, boy, this is he said, taking a long gulp. Then he ducked into a telephone booth and broke the news of his arrival to his daughter, Molly, 21, at the fam- ily home in San Francisco. He also has six other daugh- ters, three sons and two grandchildren. The his longest to nothing- new. He has flown across the Atlantic 56 times since becoming a pilot ferrying planes five years ago at a trip. Asked why he undertook such rigorous flights in which he denies himself food in the belief that his hunger will keep him awake, Conrad said: "It's my idea to make aviation interesting to and to show that flying can be done safely." He said the bills for his trip were paid by the Piper Co. and the British Petroleum Co. MAX CONRAD, Flying Granddad Incendiary Bomb Ignites, Put Out in May Co. Store An incendiary-type bomb burst into flames in the May Co. Lakewood basement at p.m. Thursday and emitted a yellow-brown smoke over a 50-foot area. The bomb was quickly extinguished by store employes. May Co. executives report- ed the incident to the Lake- wood Sheriff's station this morning. About 200 customers and store employes were in the basement of the store at the time the bomb erupted into flames. The bomb had been hidden Dead Girl's Father Offers to Help Killer Child, 3, Slain When Advances of Youth 15, Refused PHILADELPHIA fa- ther, sick with grief over the senseless slaying of his 3- year-old daughter, today wrote an open letter to the oeople of Philadelphia offer- ng to help the 15-year-old icnor student who confessed .he slaying. Anatol Holt, 31-year-old mathematics instructor at the University of Pennsylvania, expressed the thoughts of his :ormented mind in a copy- righted article in the Phila delphia Bulletin. "Dear people of Philadel Holt wrote, "I write to you this morning at the rise of dawn, still in the midst ol a tormented wake, the most terrible grief which has ever seared my soul. "Yesterday afternoon I lost the most precious thing that life ever gave to year-old girl. She was mur dered at three in the after- noon, in the basement of a house only a few doors away from ours. "Had I caught the boy in the act, I would have wishec to kill him. Now that there is no undoing of what is done, I only wish to help him. Let no feeling of cave-man ven gence influence us. Let us rather help him who did so inhuman a thing." Integration in Atlanta Is in Sight ATLANTA Judge Frank A. Hooper ruled today that Atlanta schools cannot remain racially segre- gated. But he indicated he will not order immediate integration which could lead to closing of the city's classrooms in September. Instead, it ap- peared he would allow mu- nicipal authorities time to work out an integration pat- tern. Under present law any integration could result in school closings. "Even the most ardent seg- regationists in the land, though bitterly opposed to such ruling, now recognize that racially segregated pub- lic schools are not permitted by Hooper declared. a HIS TENTATIVE order was handed down at the start of a hearing in which 10 Negro parents seek to rule out se- gregation in the city's schools. The case is being heard by Hooper and Judge Boyd Sloan without a jury. Both men have ruled against segregation; in recent cases. Hooper then allowed attor-l (Continued on Pg. A-8, Col. beneath a suitcase in the lug- gage department. AN UNIDENTIFIED store employe quickly doused the bomb with a hand fire ex- tinguisher and then dumped it into a pail of water. There was no panic in the store and no one was injured. Sheriff's arson and bomb detail members today were dispatched to Lakewood to investigate. THE BOMB was in a cardboard box and heavy wrapping paper covered it. It was tied with cord as though for mailing. Inside the bomb sheriff's deputies found an alarm clock with a Mickey Mouse face and wiring. One eyewitness said the in- cendiary material smelled like "gunsmoke." HOLT, IN HIS letter, said his letter motivated by "an irrepressi ble wish to contribute m; share of understanding t what has taken place in th hope of thus slightly increas ing our understanding of on< another." The letter was written bu a matter of hours after thi little girl, Becky Holt, wa: found stuffed in a toy close in the basement of the hom< of her teenage slayer. Thi boy, Edward Cooney Jr., ad mitted the crime after con- if ess ing to his priest. He led authorities to the closet. "I don't know why I did it. I don't know, Cooney cried. "You will the professor wrote, "that I am not lecturing to you for the (Continued on Pg. A-8, Col. 4) The Southland's Finest Evening Netvspapcr LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., FRIDAY, JUNE Vol. 106 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5D59 PRICE 10 CENTS HOME EDITION (Six Editions Daily) 56 PAGES TELEPHONE HE5-11G1 HERTER CHARGES SOVIETS TO ANNEX W. BERLIN MOTHER FOLLOWS SIRENS, FINDS JRAGEDY Mrs. Imogene Kleppin, in plaid dress, arrives (top left) at an accident scene in Milwaukee after hearing sirens at her home a block away. Her look over the shoulders of others disclosed that her daughter, Linda, 2, and sister, Mary Ann Chauklin, 14, had been killed by a truck and her son, Daniel, 3 (shown injured critically. Above right, Mrs. Kleppin, who collapsed and was treated for shock, is aided by a Wirephoto.) Tree City' Plan Is 'Way Station' to Goal, He Asserts GENEVA of State Christian A. Herter accused Russia today of proposing its West Berlin free city plan as a "way-station" on the roa'd to annexation of the city by Communist East Germany. Herter also told the Big 'is the site of one of waviest concentrations "our foreign ministers confer- ence Communist East Berlin the of subversive and spying activi- ties in the world." He charged East Germany has a spy net- work of officers and more than agents and informers. Soviet Foreign Minister An- drei A. Gromyko retorted with a denial of the accusa- tion that Russia's ultimate aim is Communist annexation of West Berlin. He also said he could make long detailed charges of subversion and es- pionage based in West Berlin but thought prolonged argu- ment on this point might hurt the conference work. Weather- Low clouds late to- night and early Satur- day. Mostly sunny Sat- urday .afternoon. Little change in temperature. i SeeA Trace of Missing LOS ANGELES joys down at the bank were scratching their heads over he missing scratch today. The Bank of America, the and an armored truck irm were trying to figure out what happened to the 200 that vanished Thursday somewhere between the rank's central vault down- town and a branch office at lauson and Avalon Aves. "RECEIPTS SHOW that the money was on the armored truck when it left the a bank spokesman said to- day. "The theory is that it I was misdelivered. "The truck made 17 stops. The money could have been j lit- Jiii_iiic_y nave M M V A dropped at any of those places; GlVAQ Hi Til HIIT by accident. We're on the job; wW Mil III MM I of Injuries Suffered in Crash LOS ANGELES Mrs. Hortick and her two driving. Police said he ran a dying mother gave birth to children were thrown boulevard stop and failed to THE MONEY was loaded prcmalure daughtcr trying to check all the stops! the truck made. "We're insured and so are the armored truck people. Ac- tually it's their worry." IN A POSSIBLY signifi. cant action, Gromyko then asked Herter, Selwyn Lloyd of Britain and French Foreign Minister Maurice Couve de Murville to come up with con- crete proposals on two points of their original package plan "or a German package Russia has rejected. These points, he said, are i possible declaration against :ising force in settlement of disputes and the creation of a zone of limited forces in central Europe. Herter asked Gromyko on what basis he wanted to dis- cuss those proposals, Gromy- ko indicated he wanted to break the Western link be- tween these two proposals and a proposal for German reunification with which they were associated in the original Western package. Herter said he was glad Gromyko was turning to the Western peace plan but Gro- myko stated that was not his intention; he only sought de- tailed information on the two points. THE SIGNIFICANCE of his move could be that he is seeking to open up more questions for inclusion in a negotiation on a Berlin stop- gap settlement. His purpose could, however, simply be to put the Soviet position in a more positive light for propa- ganda purposes. Lloyd called on Gromyko for specific and practical ef- forts to improve the situation at Berlin. Foreign Minister Lothar Bob, of East Germany renewed h i s government's proposal for a nonagression pact with West Germany- considered by the West to be a bid for West German recog- nition of East Germany. WHERE TO FIND IT Assembly leaders have re- jected the Senate's slightly fatter version of Gov. Brown's budget, but passage of the measure appeared to be assured. See Page A-2. on the truck Thursday morn ing. The delivery men, Louis Weiss of Los Angeles and Bob Kitchen of North Holly- wood, reached the Sfauson- Avalon branch about from a car driven by her hus-lpass a sobriety test. today as she was being treaty band, Donald, 31, of Eades, who suffered minor a shattering told officers: ed for injuries suffered in an'Thursday night. Mrs. Hor- automobile accident. .tick suffered a skull fracture Mrs. Dixie Lee Hortick, her children, Linda, 7, "I only had a couple of beers this afternoon. I'm new here. I just arrived from ANATOL HOLT, father of murdered 3-year-old Becky Holt, sits at a table in his Philadelphia home as he wrote an open letter to parents appealing to them to take care of their Wirephoto.) hours later, after making after doctors at Sun Val other stops. Whenjley Receiving ilospital per- they looked in the truck, the. formed a Caesarean section to money was gone. They said deliver the 5-pound, they couldn't figure it out. The FBI had men in on the search today. died of a skull fracture min-iand Michael, 5, were treatedjOregon and I'm not familiar for possible skull fractures and internal injuries. t THE OTHER driver, Allen with Hortick was treated for a lacerated forehead. Drs. Howard Baker and Kenneth J, Richland delivered Beach B-l. Hal B-9. C-8, 9. A-5. Death B-2. B-8. B-3. Shipping B-7. 3, 4. C-S. Tides, TV, C-10. B-9. girl. The infant was broiiRM'Clifford Eades, 24, a farm to General Hospital from Oregon, wasjthe baby of Mrs. placed in an incubator. hooked on suspicion of drunk'who was 8 months pregnant. B-4, 5. j   

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