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Press Telegram: Thursday, June 4, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - June 4, 1959, Long Beach, California                             CONRAD SETS LIGHT PLANE RECORD AND THE WALL CAME TUMBLING DOWN North wall of Cincinnati's old Rialto Theater collapsed during demolition op- erations Wednesday and fell on the roof of an adjoining building. Several per- sons, including two children, were trapped Wirephoto.) Probe Theft of Property at L. B. State By WARREN WALTERS An investigation into "alle- gations concerning the misuse of stale property at Long .Beach College" is now under way, the state attorney gen- eral's office in Los Angeles disclosed this morning. "The investigation has un- covered enough evidence to file grand theft charges against persons said Richard R. Rogan, chief deputy attorney Two investigators assigned to (he case have been at work for two weeks, Regan added. Rogan, who is the number one chief deputy under Atty. Crosses Into Ariz., Heads for L. A. Port Flies Miles Since Tuesday From Morocco to U. S. TUCSON Max ;onrad, who broke the non- stop distance record when lie passed over El Paso, Tex., en route from Casablanca, Mor- occo, passed over Tucson today at a.m. The professional ferry pilot talked briefly over his weak- ening radio as he passed over Hudgins Airport and said he was "not sleepy." Conrad said he would head for Los Angeles. When he broke the old record by pass- ing over El Paso, Tex., earlier today he said he would fly to San Diego, but now be- lieves he can reach Los An- geles Internalional Airport. "I'm going to make it with no trouble but !'d trade a gal- lon of my gasoline for a drink of Conrad said as he passed over Tucson. CONRAD, 56, left Africa Tuesday in a Piper Comanche 250 and has been going ever since. Officials have arranged for customs service agents to be on hand when he lands. Conrad, known as the "Fly- ing dipped to within 100 feet of the ground as he passed over the El Paso Airport. He was escorted by a squadron of El Paso planes. V CONRAD TOLD the con- trol tower at El Paso Airport that where lie stops depends on how his gasoline supply ilooks. He reported over Van Horn, Tex., 80 miles out of El Paso, that he had 70 gal- lons left. The Southland's Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, JUNE 4, 1959 Vol. 105 CLASSIFIED HE 2-5359 PRICE 10 CENTS PAGES TELEPHONE IIB5-11GL HOME EDITION (Six Editions Hero Saves Tot in Train Path CLARENCE E. BERRY, 45, of 5318 E. Keynote St., MRS. FRANCES NOAKES comforts tearful daughter, IQ a nnilVPfl Da t 1 R it linn-m inft o i ___._ _ i i -ir- i _ _ is admired by daughter, Pat, 15, at his home after saving life of a child in Torrance. 2 Kim, who was snatched from path of freight train that missed her hy three feet. Mice Satellite Orbit Attempt Failure Bared VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. lu 01 rasu. uonraaipossiDinty oi a reduction in Ihe satellite rocket Discoverer III, which blasted fourjhad broken the record when the military force hhirk mirp intn cnar-n IIP raHinnrl in frrvrn Vsn I. __ Wesf May Cut Force in Berlin GENEVA West It is miles from Casa- ol't to Russia today the blanca to Paso. Conrad possibility of a reduction in black mice into space Wednesday, almost certainly re-entered the atmosphere and destroyed itself instead 2 Beat Up L. A. Boxing CS! _ LOS ANGELES of going into orbit. The Advanced Research Projects Agency made this announcement today hours after what appeared to be a perfect launch of the 78- foot missile. "One of the possibilities under it said, "was that the injection angle of the vehicle was improper, it to re-enter the he radioed in from Van Horn. The old record was set by M. L. Boling on a flight from Manila, in the Philippines, to Pendleton, Ore., last year. Boling flew miles. Conrad, a trans-Atlantic Fran in West Berlin if Russia will pledge unrestricted access lor traffic on the vital supply lines between Berlin and West Germany. Ike, Mamie Fete Staff ministers of jUnited States, Britain and 'France discussed measures to Isolve the Berlin crisis in a 90- minute secret session with Long Reach bakery salesman risked his life to save a girl who ran into the path of a train here Wednesday. Witnesses said Clarence E. Berry, 45, of 5318 E. Keynote St., sprinted through traffic to scoop up Kim Noakes after she had tumbled in front of the moving freight. His heroic deed occurred before the horrified gaze of the tot's mother, Mrs. Frances Noakes, 22, of 1551 Torrance Blvd., several neighbor wom- en and passers-by. f-. MRS. NOAKES said she was laundering when tiny Kim slipped from her side, crossed a dirt road and climbed onto the Southern Pacific right-of-way along ..U...J3 i L iu 1.111.1; i nit; key wilness in a boxing probe several thousand; _ was severely beaten from the launch day night and today he toldl The Air Force had hoped to police he thought organized ,r in: muugni. organised Gen. Stanley Mask, lhejcrirnc had actcd in nature of the allegations, the type of property or the value against him. The victim, Jackie Leonard, put the satellite into orbit for 26 hours, then eject the mouse-carrying capsule near Hawaii and catch it as WASHINGTON dent and Mrs. Eisenhower will host at their Gettysburg at the Villa of Maurice Couve de Murville of France. They were expected to continue Crash Kills Doherty, L B. GOP Leader A prominent Long Beach Republican leader was killed early today when he apparently lost control of his car on the Long Beach Freeway near Atlantic Ave., East Los Angeles, ripping out more than 60 feet of guardrail. Dead on arrival at May- wood Emergency Hospital was Warren Edward Doherty, i ui diuilg Russia s Andrei A. Gromyko Torrance Blvd. When the mother sighted the child on the track a 12-car, diesel- driven freight was bearing I V TTUO UI.CI L I I I the negotiations at dinner atjdown upon her. Mrs. Noakes the f'rcnch villa tonight. The issue of access ._. military traffic of the West- ern powers and for German and neighbors screamed as for the youngster fell beside the track. Berry ran from his parked ui yiopcny or me value The victim Jackie Leonard mwa" and catch it as itiPiay nost at their Gettysburg lor uurman Berry ran from his parked of the property involved :fight of Hollywood parachuted. This would have farm home on Saturday to "Vlllan traffic is one of the truck and across the busy cannot be revealed at thisjLegion Stadiiim was asked ifimade the mice the first crea- about 200 members of the problcm lhe He sprinted across the nmc- he thought the Mafia return alive from White House staff. dispute. A Soviet agreement track and pulled the baby to behind his beating and re-orbit- The guests will include Permit lrafflc 'o move safety as the front car of the HE SAID, however. i "itnoul interlerence wou d train within ttirco foot "If you mean organized ii >-uu mean organizeo wnu tmve jumeu 11 since crime, yes. Knowing Frankiej director, said the last signals; 1955 when a similar affair Carbo and what he is, this jsjreceived from Discoverer Iltjwas held; employes of the just the sort of operation he were 13 minutes after staff, and members would be connected with. With guys like this in boxing, launch. He said data so far obtain- to'V LI iia 111 nuking, ou i til uuiam ijci VIL.C UClatl. j nobody who is honest has aiable indicate the mice were' Press Secretary James C.' chance. The guys who and apparently in said President Eisen- it to me are typical. They condition during blastoff and (during a period of weightless 1 fVio have no guts." ness while the rocket coasted. allegations concern "the same thing" !hat took place recently at Los Angeles Slate College. -A Los Angeles State Col- lege employe pleaded guilty three days ago to taking ma- terials from that college to build a fence al his home. In the Los Angeles State College case, the attorney general's office handled the initial investigation and then turned the matter over to the allcl Los Angeles District Attor- trip to a neighborhood drug- ney's office prosecution. store jn Northridge, a Losi 'Angeles suburb. THE PROCEDURE would! Leonard suffered a be the same in the wound. Police said nejXIS Flight Again Beach State College was struck with a PosfnempH hu AC Rogan said. {gallon jug containing chlor- 7.t'rwllcu Mr Rogan said the allegations'ine for his swimming pool, concerning the misuse of state But Leonard's wife said a property at LBSC was furn-i jculties today forced postpone- jshcd to the attorney on PS- A'4- until at least Friday of _ _ __ e ft- me guests will include V members of the presidential W JT ROY W. JOHNSON, who have joined it since M10 f __i_ -j nist b ockade of Wpsf Rpr m of the White House Secret Service detail. track and pulled the baby to safety as the front car of the train was within three feet of them. Mrs Noakes said she and neighbors were running UPR10R TO THIS after- for Kim when Berry rescued >on's session, htph hower will go to Gettysburg some time Friday, TWO MEN attacked Leon-l Valuable medical informa- mitial investigation and then ard as he was putting awayjtion was received from the re- turned the matter over to the-his automobile after a shortldio signals received, he said. The injection angle is the (Continued Page A-5, Col. 2) ished to the attorney gener al's office by employes of the local school. He added that his investi- gators are now compiling ad- AIR FORCE Technical diffi- jculties today forced postpone- ditional evidence on the LBSC Sl" f'ts army today in the wake of invasion thrusts. WHERE TO FIND IT Nicaragua began doubling the size of its army today in matter. See Page A-3. OFFICIAL STATUS Apple Worms Get Solons' Solemn OK SACRAMENTO (UPI) The Assembly Agriculture Committee approved 3. bill Wednesday which would permit the packaging of one wormy apple with every 20 good ones. The bill restricts the amount of defective apples to 10 per cent of the full package. Half of the defec- tive apples may be wormy. Beach B-l, Hal A-25. A-25. C-7 to 13. B-10, 11. A-16. Death B-2. A-24. B-3. Shipping A-9. C-l, 2, 3, 6. B-8. Tides, TV, C-M. Vital C-7. A-25. B-4, 5, 6, 7. World A-2. noon's session, high Western (Officials said a reduction in _ Ithe size of the Berlin garrison might be made through an agreement to put a ceiling on EARTHLINGS the size of the force. The ceil- enough to Mrs. Noakes ing than thejdeclared. "That bakery man's act was the bravest, thing I've Nonscientific Mice Get in the Act, Too VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE (UPI) racing to report the firing of four black mice into space Wednesday found five baby mice in a nest on their telephone table. Their nonscientific field mouse mother had nested They emphasized such an agreement would be possible a scheduled first free flight for the rocket ship X15. Jllulllcl lltaltt The glide test for the iittlei the brood under the tar- crafl had been scheduled for! paulin which normally cov- today but a 24-hour delay wasl ers the outdoor telephone announced this morning. installation. her. "WE NEVER would have deputies, Mrs. Hazelrigg was thrown from the small sports :ar under the trailer being 38, of 6050 Los Santos Dr., pulled by McAllister's truck. Former president of the 70th Republican Assembly District committee. California Highway Patrol officers said Doherty, alone in his car at the time of the acci- dent, was thrown from the car onto Atlantic Ave., below the Freeway. The officers said the auto hit the rail with such impact that the engine, trans- mission and two fenders, torn from the demolished sedan were also strewn along the Atlantic Ave, underpass. DOHERTY WAS employed by the Ace Building Mainte- nance Co. of Riverside. The body was taken to L. R. Rice Mortuary in Maywood while officials attempted to locate Doherty's brother, be- lieved to live in the San Fran- cisco area. An 80-year-old visitor from Texas was killed Wednesday, and two other women were injured seriously, when their sports car collided with a made it in time and the cn-jtruck and trailer at Rosecrans gineer didn't see Kim soon and Carmenita Aves., Nor- present 10.000-man these officials said. level, ever seen." "There wasn't anything to walk. Killed was Mrs. Ollye Hazelrigg, 80, of San An- tonio, Tex., who was visiting her daughter, Mrs. Sadie Me- umbilici, oauie m it, Berry, who drives for theTaggert, 57, of 14516 SE danger to me." i----------- 'TJJVI uiivia u it, dgguTL Ot only as part of a broad Bakery of Long Beach.'Feliciano Dr., La Mirada tlement in which later. "It sure scares you _ le rights of theito death to see a child in the INJURED IN the crash Western powers in West lin, would promise not to in- terfere with the traffic flow. Gromyko, according to in- formants fully familiar with the talks, has in the last few days shown some elasticity in his attitude, but the high- est Western leaders do not know whether he yet has in- structions from Soviet Pre- mier S. Nikita Khrushchev to (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) path of a moving train. Ijtaken to Carobil Hospital, didn't think there was much Norwalk, was Mrs. McTag- gart and her daughter, Mrs. Margaret Caldwell, 24, of 1232 Locust Ave., Norwalk, driver of the car, and truck driver James McAllister Jr., of 13734 Busby Dr., Whit- to sheriff's Weather- Low clouds late to- night and early Friday. Mostly sunny Friday and little change in tempera- ture. Maximum tempera- ture by noon today: 71. MOTHER WOULDN'T LET HER GO ON PICNIC Girl Sparks Vandalism DENVER her mother wouldn't let her go on a picnic, a 15-year-old girl touched off an vandalism spree at a Denver high school. Here's the story told by police today: The girl was expected to stay home and care for her three younger sisters last Saturday while her mother went to an evening job. But the girl said her mother had promised to let her attend the picnic, then changed her mind. Angrily, she left the house with her 11-year-old sister, and the two began throwing rocks through windows of West Denver High School They ripped out records in the principal's office and scattered food in the home economics rooms. That night, with two 17-year-old boys, the girls planned a Sunday escapade during which they went back to the school and smashed worth of band instru- ments. One of the boys admitted starting a fire that caused damage. The boys were picked up first and they blamed the spree on the older girl, detective Les Strcctcr said. The youngsters were Questioned again today. No charges have been filed. Billion m Space Funds OKd WASHINGTON in- vestment of nearly half a bil- lion dollars in the race for space supremacy won over- whelming Senate approval to- day. This completed passage of a authorization for use of the civilian space administration during the 12 months that begin July 1. The vote was 81-1, with Sen. Allen J. Ellender (D-La) opposing. The measure, carrying the exact total recommended by President Eisenhower for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, now must go back to the House for action on several Senate amendments. V CONGRESS MUST vote ac- tual funds later in a separate appropriations bill. Sen. John Stennis floor manager for the bill, told the Senate this probably would be the smallest of a series of annual civilian space programs over the next 5 to 10 years. Costs are expected to hiL S2 billion within two years. The bill includes funds for a wide variety of rockets, sat- ellites, space vehicles and other experiments that might have been branded as fantas- tic a few years ago. WARREN DOHERTY Lost Control of Car Cliffs Inspected; PCH May Open PACIFIC PALISADES Engineers inspected i today a new crack in the cliffs overlooking the Pacific iCoast Hway. before deciding iwhether to reopen the north- bound lane to traffic. Officials said Wednseday that the crack might (further and cause another Traffic on the lane was 'closed off Wednesday when the crack was discovered. Traffic on the highway, from Channel Rd. to Sunset Blvd., was closed off earlier for three days because of a 'landslide.   

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