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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: May 28, 1959 - Page 1

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Location: Long Beach, California

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - May 28, 1959, Long Beach, California                             MONKEYS SURVIVE SPACE TRIP 'Asfre-Apes' Go Aloft in Jupiter Nose Cone MONKEY BAKER, American squirrel monkey that- survived rocket flight from Cape Canaveral, looks through microscope at her favorite food, peanuts, whi.le undergoing preflight Wirephotos.) CAPE CANAVERAL Two monkeys returned alive today from a space rifle; in the nose cone of an Army missile. The Army announced that monkeys were recovered .from compartments in the''nose cone Jupiter missile fired from Cape Canaveral. The rocket had climbed to an altitude of 300 miles and flown at speeds up to miles per hour: The little female-monkeys Able and Baker are the .first- living creatures the United States has hurled into the farther reaches .and brought back alive. The Russians claim to.have brought back two dogs by parachute last August from a ride 281 miles out. And the Air Force in 1953 re- covered two monkeys after firing them some 40 miles high over New Mexico. feat represents a ma jo'r break-through in the U. S. effort to put a man into orbital flight. Scientists said instruments attached to the small passen- gers; showed they suffered lit- tle.jll effect from the stresses of blast-off and the weird ex- perience of weightlessness in some nine minutes of the 15- minute journey. Only the bare announce ment that the monkeys sur vived was contained in the initial report received by the Army from a Navy ship which recovered the nose cone. This was near the Island of Antigua 92 minutes rafter ttj'e Jupiter soared up. TECHNICIANS explained that the delay was the resul need to undo a me chanical maze in opening the passenger compartment. It., had been known pre viously, through radio from the nose cone, that the monkeys were alive and wel one, minute before their land ing in the water. But the last-minute signal, failed, an occurrence not a (Continued Page A-4, Col. 2) WHERE TO FIND IT Foster Dulles' funera reached proportions seldom matched in U. S. history. Set Page A-3. fe.ach B-i. Hal A-9. A-9. Classified to 8, C-6, 7. D-I. Death B-2. A-8. B-3. Shipping C-5. C-l, 2, 3. C-5. Tides, TV, C-8. Vital C-5. Women 5, 6. Your A-2. MONKEY. ABLE, an American-born Rhesus, peers from cage before historic flight into space and back. Able was one of two "astromonks" aboard. Wife Beats, Scalds L B. Man in Row An enraged wife used an electric iron and a pot o wiling water to end a domestic quarrel here this morn ing, police reported. The husband, Walter E. Crawford, 31, of 719 E. 17th St., was taken to St. Mary's Hospital. The wife, Nortna, 21, who s-5 feet, 11 inches tall and weighs 215 pounds, was ar- rested for assault with a deadly weapon. Physicians reported Craw- :ord had seven. deep scalp wounds. He had first and sec- ond-degree burns over 35 per cent of his body from the waist up, HE WILL have to be close ly observed for a minimum of two weeks to see whether the burns.develop critically, they added. Mrs. Crawford told police she was awakened when her husband broke a glass in the kitchen door about a. m. to. get in the apartment. He had'been drinking, she said, and cursed her. She put on a pot of water to make coffee, hoping to sober him, BUT HE continued to curse her and she finally poured the water on him and peatedly struck him on the head with an iron, police said she admitted. Mrs. Crawford is employed by a Long Beach cleaner and dyer and her husband works for a similar business in Bell- flower. NORMA L. CRAWFORD Accused of Assault Greyhound Bus Hits Truck in Fog SOUTH BEND, Ind. Greyhound bus bound from Chicago to New York ramme the rear end of a cattle true in a dense fog this morning sending J3 persons to a Sout Bend hospital. The bus driver, William Cole, 50, Maywood, III., su fcred a possible dislocation o the right hip, but the 12 pas sengers taken to memoria hospital .were not believe hurt seriously. IPtress (Kelesram HOME The Southland's Finetl Evening Vol. 0 PAGES YO f LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., THURSDAY, MAY 1959 CLASSIFIED HE 2-595t PEICE 10 CENTS TELEPhONE HE5-H61 EDITION (Six Editions State Agrees o Negotiate Jplands Line Lands Commission Heeds Request by Mayor Kealer By HARRY FARRELL (Sptcii! It IK Prets-Tckirjm) State ands Commission agreed to- ay to begin a month of in.- nsive negotiation with the ity of Long Beach in an ef- oit to settle the disputed oundary of the city's state- ranted tidelands without a awsuit. Such a course of action was equested by Mayor Ray- mond C. Kealer to avoid liti- ation which could snarl the Long Beach anti-subsidence rogram for repressu'ring oil ields in the area of dispute. State Sen. Richard Rich- ards (D-Los Angeles) made an appeal similar .to Kealer's, IN ANOTHER tidelands ac- ion, the Assembly passec AB 2400 sponsored by Wil- iam S. Grant {R-Long Beach) by a vote of 75-1. The bil: would permit the city to ex end leases of firms now op crating in the uplands area by 25 years regardless of the outcome of the. negotiations Some 10 oil operators now easing land from the city, are reluctant to begin anti-subsi dence repressurization inas much as their leases are slated to expire in two to three years. THE URGENCY of the anti-subsidence effort was stressed by Kealer in his statement to the lands com mission. "Time is of the iie said. "Already the city has lost some major industries and will lose the huge Lonj Beach Naval Shipyard if sub sidence is not halted." Kealer assured the'commis sion the city's aim is to reach negotiated boundary settle ment quickly, and not to en ;age in a series of delaying :actics to head off a state lawsuit. "OUR REQUEST is made n absolute good the mayor said. "We will si down and work diligentlj with you in these negotia tions. We're ready to fish 01 cut bait." The city-owned property in volved in the boundary issue s in the turning-basis are o the Long Beach inner harbor Historically Long Bead has construed the property ti be uplands and claims a fre< and clear title to it. In 1959 however, the legislature di reeled the lands commissio: (Continued Page A-4; Col. 1] Felon Who Slew Sher Surrenders PITTSBURGH es caped convict, sought in an all-night manhunt for the slaying of a sheriff, stumblei from his hiding place in a wooded section at dawn toda; and meekly surrendered to po lice. Gray-haired 50 year ol  'resident Eisenhower today :old Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. G r o m y k o "a measure of progress" must be made at the present Geneva East-West talks if Russia wants a summit meeting. Eisenhower so expressed himself during a 30-miniite White -House meeting with Gromykd and the American British, and French foreign :ers. G r o m y k o, without com menting on Eisenhower's cali for progress, described .the session as "a .very pleasant and useful conversation.' French Foreign. Minister Maurice Couve de Murville and British Foreign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd, described Gro- myko's comment as "a tripar tite thus saying in light humor that this was also their comment. IN A formal statement read to newsmen by his press secretary, James C. Hagefty, Eisenhower expressed hbpe that the Geneva meeting "would lead to a better ap- proach to the problems that confront us in Europe." Hagerty said Eisenhower (Continued Page A-2, Col. 3) Solons Hit Rivalries, Cut Defense Funds WASHINGTON a blast at'Pentagon ivalries, "confusion and the House Ap- propriations Committee, today recommended in new funds for the Defense Department. 'In cutting from the amount requested by President. Eisenhower for the year starting July 1, the committee told the Army and Woman Assaulted 2nd Cabot Approved as Brazil Envoy WASHINGTON UP) Ca- reer diplomat John M. Cabot today won unanimous Senate confirmation as ambassador to Brazil, the post Mrs. Clare Boothe Luce resigned after a row with Sen. Wayne Morse Cabot's nomination was ap- proved by voice vote, with- out a word of debate. He now is ambassador to Colombia. HAPPY HOME (NOT JOB) SAFE Firing Puts Boss, Not. Girl, in Bad (Not Bed) A Long Beach unemployment for got even. She inadvertently penned this explanation as the reason for her dismissal: "Got in bed with the boss." Clerks at California Department of Employment, 1313 Pine Ave., shrugged their shoulders knowingly, then mailed the form to the employer for verification as is re- quired under state law. The shocker came when the mail with the boss's form was opened at the employer's office. The form was opened and read with growing fury by the boss' wife happens to work as bookkeeper for the firm. "BUT I- AH protested the boss. Both boss and wife went to the employment department for a fuller explanation. George Toll, department manager, arranged a speedy conference between fired employe, boss and wife. The girl who was fired took one look at her unem- ployment claim, then blushed violently and apologized. She said: "I have made one more mistake. I meant to say I was dismissed for 'getting in BAD with the boss.1" The explanation saved the boss' happy it didn't save her job. For obvious reasons, Toll is keeping the names secret. Time LOS ANGELES 03V-Ter- ror in the night again has overwhelmed Ruth Gwinn and put her at the brink of death. A sex maniac attacked her early today as she walked at 24th St. .and Grand Ave. It .was the second time in seven years that Mrs. Gwinn was the victim of a vicious assault. A SHADOWY figure leaped from behind a tree shortly after midnight today and dragged 57-year-old Mrs. Gwinn screaming into a park- ing lot. He beat her with a piece of oak flooring, raped her and 'abused her with broken wine bottle. The attacker ignored shout- inquiries from nearby apartment residents aroused by Mrs. Gwinn's screams. Mrs. Gwinn suffered, a frac- tured skull and internal injur- ies. In the 1952 attack, Mrs. Gwinn was shot in the back as she fled in terror. The first attacker was not apprehended. And police said they had been unable to trace the second assailant. Freighter Afire; 29 Men Saved PINAR DEL RIO, Cuba A Cuban navy launch res- cued the captain and 28 crew- men of a Greek freighter on fire and grounded Wednesday night off the northwest coast of Cuba. The ship's carpenter was the only fatality reported. He was killed in a boiler ex- plosion which started the fire. .The ship, the Aghios Spyfidon, was ground- ed on a reef off Puerto Esper- anza, 32 miles northeast of :his capital of Pinar Del Rio Province in western Cuba. Weather- Some night and early- morning clouds, but mostly sunny Friday. Little change in tem- perature. Maximum tem- perature by noon today: 70. the Air Force to cease bicker- ing over who has 'the best called for 'a 'general lightening up on defense oper- ations, and spoke of a grow- ing Soviet military threat On the face of its actio'n, it sided with the Arrriy in Its missile war with Air Force by boosting Army funds and cutting Air Force money For missiles. IT APPROVED funds 'to >eef up the Strategic: Air Command, to shore up the Davy's antisubmarine war- fare program, and to expe- dite work 'on atomic airplanes. It disapproved the Presi- dent's plans to reduce the strength of the National and the reserve forces ut went along with his.fig- ures for active military man- power. It refused the Navy's re- quest for 260 million .dollars to build a new super aircraft arrier. And it voted to authorize the President to keep our big strike-back bombers 'in the air around the clock if neces- sary to prevent their destruc- tion on the ground by a sneak attack. THESE AND OTHER ac- tions were included in a bill the committee sent to the Continued Page A-2, Col. 6) Blasts, Fire Hit Calif. Butane Firm BAKERSFIELD OB A roaring fire, preceded by five explosions, swept the Hono- ulu Oil Co. butane gas plant at McKittrick today. It appeared to be contained at 10 a.m., three hours after it started, the fire was still out of control in the plant, >ut the outside area was out of danger. Smoke from blazing plant was visible in Baketv ield, 40 miles to the east Two men injured in the ilaze were taken to a hospital n Taft. Their condition was eported good> Cause of the blaze was ttft. determined.   

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