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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: May 27, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - May 27, 1959, Long Beach, California                             IKE, BIG 4 MINISTERS TO CONFER ON PARLEY DULLES' DAUGHTER, SON AJ CATHEDRAL Two 'children of John Foster Robert Hinshaw of New York and the Rev. Avery Washington National Cathedral Tuesday after 'attending a brief prayer service for Dulles, whose funeral was today. Mrs. Hinshaw is a Presbyterian minister; Avery is a Roman Catholic Senate Votes World Leaders, 3-Cent Tax Common Folk in on Cigarettes Dulles Farewell WASHINGTON Foster Dulles was borne to a hero's grave today with the solemn fare- well of a saddened world. President Eisenhower and top diplomats from throughout the globe paid their last respects to the former secretary of state at simple funeral services in Income Levy Hike Also OKd; Final Action Due Soon By MORRIE LANDSBERG SACRAMENTO The administration, its cigarette and income tax bills approved by the Senate, pressed today for passage of the 'biggest state budget ever presented to the Legislature. debate on the o 11 a r spending bill came as a quick follow-up to Tuesday's .decisive Senate vote which means: July 1, California smokers will pay a 3-cent-a- pack cigarette tax. It's ex- pected to add up to 61 million dollars a year. And Californians will pay an estimated 60.7 million dol lars more in personal income taxes for 1959-60 and 71.4 the next year. THE NEW RATES win hit higher brackets mostly. Those in lower income brackets will, get a slight cut. ;Bolh bills previous'y passed Assembly. They'll return there for concurrence in Sen- atV amendments, then on to Gbv. Brown for his signature. ;fhe major changes elimi- nated cigars and pipe tobacco from the smokers' tax bill and proyided for a state tax stamp or decal to collect the levy on cigarettes. ;The cigarette tax went through the Senate, 26-10, and income tax measure, 26- Only minority Repub- licans voted against them. The Democratic majority made it an easy victory for (he Democratic governor. 'Still pending in the Assem- bly and Senate are Brown's other proposals for meeting an' anticipated 250-million- dollar deficit. These include biJosts in beer, horse racing inheritance and bank-corpo- ration tax rates and a 2 per cent oil-gas severance tax. By MERRIMAN SMITH White House Talks Slated on Thursday Foreign Chiefs Fly to Washington for Funeral of Dulles WASHINGTON dent Eisenhower and Secre tary of State Christian A Herter will discuss the Geneva conference negotia tions with the foreign minis ters of Russia, Britain and France. The President and Herle today arranged a Whiti House conference for a. m. Thursday. They will meet with th Soviet Union's Andrei Gro myko, Britain's Selwyn LIoy< and France's Maurice Couv de Murville. Herter and the other thrc foreign ministers flew t Washington from Geneva fo the funeral of John Foste Dulles today. The Geneva negotiation have been pretty much o dead center in efforts to re solve East-West differences a ANNOUNCEMENT of plan for the White House confer ence came shortely after dis closure that Eisenhower wi be host at a luncheon Thur. which he was characterized as the "Mr. Valiant" of the day for tne foreign ministe; free world's quest for peace. and high officials and dign 'Vote Slap' Disputed Faubus LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Gov. Orval E. Faubus said to- day he did not feel results of Monday's school board recall election indicated the people of Little Rock wanted him to eep hands off their public chool affairs. "There was no clear-cut ssue in the Faubus said. Three militant segregation- sis backed by Faubus were ecalled from the board in Monday's balloting and three moderates he opposed kept'for six eventual years. WHERE TO FIND IT John Foster Dulles was a confident man, accustomed to success and loath to acknowl edge or admit setbacks. See the last of a series on Page A-4: B-I. ,Hal B-S. B-9. C-4 to 11. B-10, II. A-15. Death B-2. EditorialPage B-8. B-3. Shipping A-24, C-l, 2, 3, 4. A-22. .fides, TV, C-12. Vital C-4. B-9. B-4, 5. Your A-2. The funeral service in the great gothic Washington Cathedral was attended by one of the greatest assem- blages of national and inter- national figures ever brought together here. Then, they rnad.e a last journey with the famed statesman to Arlington Na- tional Cemetery where he was laid to rest in the shad- ows of a graceful yellowwood tree. There, near the tomb of the unknowns, Dulles joined in eternal comradeship other American heroes who died in the service of their country. THE DIGNITARIES came from all corners of the world from the Far East, from the Far East, from Russia, HOME The Finest Evening Newspaper LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, MAY Vol. LXXII-No. 98 48 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS CLASSIFIED HE 2-5359 TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) dign taries of other countries wh are here for the Dulles fi neral. The President met for minutes this morning wi West Germany's Konrad Ade- nauer, also here for the fu- neral. James. C. Pfagerty, White House press secretary, an- nouncing plans for the lunch- eon was asked whether it would be social or include discussions of the Geneva negotiations. "As fast as I knew I'll tell Hagerty replied. BEFORE THE conference with Adenauer the President (Continued Page A-5, Col. 3) ANDREI GROMYKO the Soviet foreign minister who often bitterly fought former Secretary of State John Foster Dulles at the conference table, praises him as "an outstanding statesman, outstanding on arrival at National Airport today to attend Dulles' funeral. Left is Mikhail Menshi- kov, Soviet ambassador to the U. S., who met Wirephoto.) from Europe, from Latin America to pay their last tribute to the man who charted the nation's foreignj policy through the Cold War heir seats. FAUBUS MET newsmen to- ay first time since he election. He issued a statement but most of his views were drawn nit in a question-and-answer ession. Faubus pointed out that a jtizens -'committee opposing lis faction on the board cam- paigned solely on the issue of dismissal of 44 teachers by he three segregationist board members. THE GOVERNOR said he would be willing to interpret any vote as a vote for inte- ;ration only if the question posed on the ballot was "for or against total, integration." He said that was the ballot question when Little Rock voted 3 to 1 against integra- :ion after he closed four pub ic high schools last Septem- ber. The governor said he would 36 willing to accept a compro- mise on the deadlocked school situation if one were offered lul he denied he had been working on a plan to get the schools open next fall under token integration compro- Dulles' chief diplomatic ad- 'ersary over the years Soviet Foreign Minister An- rei side by side with statesmen of the' ree world and for the 40- minule Presbyterian cere- mony in the cathedral. Then he joined in the long accession to Arlington Cemetery across the Potomac River. The mourners who packed he high-vaulted cathedral a "who's who" of world diplomacy. THERE WERE the leaders wo other :hancellor Konrad Adenauer of West Germany and Prime Minister Robert G. Menzies of foreign min- sters, Secretary General -lammarskjold of the Unitec Nations, NATO Secretary 'aul Henri-Spaak, seven other special envoys and Ma dame Chiang Kai-shek, wife of the president of Nation alist China. And then the ambassadors of every country represented (Continued on Pg. A-5, Col. 6] Swedish Freighter Ablcne; 24 Rescued STOCKHOLM, Sweden -The crew of 22 men and 2 women was rescued from the Swedish freighle Bcrkel after it caught fire in the Baltic today. The Stavesnas coastal dio station said a passing Danish motor vessel saved the crew, many of whom hai jumped into lifeboats whil still in their pajamas. Earth Slide Crashes on Coast Hwy. PACIFIC PALISADES landslide crashed down on the busy Pacific Coast Hwy. shortly before noon today, closing it to traf- fic between Santa Monica Canyon and Sunset Blvd. The falling rocks and dirt narrowly missed a Grey- hound bus and a truck, wit- nesses said. Most northbound traffic was stopped at Santa Msjiica Canyon waiting for a rec light when between 20 anc 30 cubic yards of earth rumbled down north of Santa Monica Canyon. Traffic was rerouted onto Chautaqua Blvd. and Channe Rd. as State Division of Highways crews moved into the area. The slide was minor com pared to the death-dealing avalanche which buried the highway March 31, 1958 claiming the life of V. O Sheff, superintendent of the Venice office of the Stale Division of Highways. 1 Missing, 1 Killed os 2 Jeh Fall SOUTH LACUNA Two Marine jet planes crashed within a mile of each other early today, killing at least one of the pilots. The second pilot is missing. Marine authorities believed :he two crashes to be unre- ated. They occurred 30 min- Russ 'Deadline1 Day Quiet in West Berlin BERLIN day the Russians once set fo the Western allies to clear out of West Berlin cam utes apart over rugged ter rain. Names of the pilots were withheld until notified. relatives are MARINE OFFICIALS said one plane was an F8U Cru- sader jet fighter and the oth- er an FJ4 Fury fighter craft. One plane was returning from Ellis Air Force Base at Las Vegas and the other from the Marine Auxiliary Air Station at Yuma, Ariz. 'One plane crashed into a corn field on the Old Shoe- maker Ranch and touched ofl a brush fire which burnec more than three acres before county and state firemen brought it under control. The other crash was aboui a mile east of the Shoemaker ranch in a hilly area. Weather-- Considerable cloudi- ness tonight and Thurs- day, but partly cloudy Thursday afternoon. Lit- tle change in tempera- ture. Maximum tempera- ture by noon today: 70. today and all was quiet. i Military and civilian traffic! moved normally in and out of his city surrounded by the Communists. Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev had al- ready postponed his May 271 Berlin condition; that the West sit down and negotiate on it with the Rus- ians. The negotiations actually were in recess. The Big Four foreign who met in Geneva May 11 to talk about Berlin and the division of Germany, were uniled briefly in Washington for the funeral of John Foster Dulles. INSPECTIONS around Ber- lin showed the Russians still manning the checkpoints on the vital rail and road con- nections to the city. That meant they had not gone through with the threat to turn the checkpoints over to their East and were German sticking satellite by the four-p o w e r agreements on Berlin. The U. S. Army said it planned no special alert for American troops in West Berlin. But all the talk of May 27 apparently acted as a magnet for tourists. West Berlin was thronged with a record num- ber of foreign visitors here for conventions, a fashion show, sightseeing and fun. must disappoint those expect to get bravery "I who said Mayor Willy Brandt smilingly. "May 2' will be like any other day." CUBAN CHIEF'S BROTHER, 3 WALK OUT OF SWAMPS Russ Aid's Missing Wife Safe LONDON WI A Sovii diplomat's missing wi showed up unexpectedly to- day at the British Foreign Office. Two officials of the Soviet Embassy interviewed her there. The womna is Mrs. Nina Dmitriev, 35, wife of the new- ly appointed Soviet naval assistant attache. Soviet Embassy staff mem- bers had been hunting for Mrs. Dmitriev since last Sun day, when she and her 5-year old daughter, Lena, disap- peared from their London apartment. A FOREIGN OFFICE spokes- man said the Soviet Embassy reported her disappearance to British authorities Monday. Soviet officials requested an interview with her and Mrs. Dmitriev agreed. Brit- ish officials were present throughout the talk. "She is free to get in touch with the Soviet Embassy or to return to the Soviet the Foreign Office spokesman said. He refused to disclose fur- ther details. K' in Threat on Albanian Docket Sites Italy and Greece Set Warning From. Russian Premier MOSCOW UP) Nikita hrushchev says the Soviet Jnion is ready to set iip ocket bases in Albania arid Sulgaria to match any the Jnited States may establish n Italy or Greece. The Soviet premier, visit- ng Albania, repeated an ear- ier Soviet proposal for a ban nuclear weapons in the Jalkan Peninsula to make it 'a peninsula of peace with- out any missiles or nuclear weapons." He warned Italy and Greece hat U. S. rockets bases on heir territory "will attrack our rockets as a magnet.'' "These bases -are clearly spearheaded against: the So- viet Union, against Albania and' other Socialist (Commu- nist) he said in a speech Tuesday in Tirana, {he Albanian capital. His remarks were repeated by Tass, So- viet news agency. IF ITALY and Greece go ahead with NATO plans to locate bases for supplied .missiles on their ter- ritory, Khrushchev declared, "it will compel us to build up forces for a worthy reply. he said, "we shall have to reach agree- ment with the government of the People's Government '6f (Continued Page A-5, Col. 1) BAD DRIVER Defendant Kills Self in Leap at L A. LOS ANGELES While his wife and small daughter sat in a nearby courtroom, a 26-year-old nar- cotics suspect broke away from his guard Tuesday and leaped seven floors to his death in the Hall of Justice, Pete Alvarez was appear- ing for preliminary hearing before Municipal judge Earl 0. Lippold. During a recess, he asked to go to the rest- room. When his guard re- moved the handcuffs in the restroom, Alvarez bolted and leaped through an open wiri- dow. HIS WIFE, Connie, 24, and daughter, Marcella, 2, were in the courtroom for his hear- ing when he made his death leap. They were also par- ents of two other children. Alvarez was arrested May 12 by state narcotics agents who claimed they found more than 100 pounds of marijuana in his home. He was being held on bail. Raul Castro Unhurt in Plane Crash HAVANA Cas- tro, Prime Minister Fidel Cas- tro's flamboyant younger brother, was found safe today after walking away from a plane crash in the swamps of south central Cuba. Raul and his crew of three airmen were reported in good spirits. They crashed Tues- day during an aerial search mission. The leftward-leaning Raul, commander-in-chicf of Cuba's armed forces and heir-desig- nate to succeed Fidel, plunked down in a marsh in the Enscnada de la Bros area south of Cienaga Zapata. THE FOUR abandoned their plane and headed for the coast along the bank of the River Hatiguanico. Peas- ants helped guide them out of the swamps. A helicopter spotted Raul and his companions this morn- ing. It radioed for help and the men were picked up by four navy launches at the mouth of the river. Raul had gone on a rescue mission that proved unneces- sary. THE YOUNGER Castro, 28, disappeared Tuesday after taking off from Havana with three aids in a light plane to search for the crashed heli- copter of Air Force Com- mander Maj. Pedro Luis Diaz Lanz. Brother Fidel, who was al- ready in the area on a tour, took another helicopter and found Diaz and his two com- panions alongside their wrecked aircraft. They were unhurt.. Later the prime minister personally took over the search for his brother, whose plane had only enough gas for an hour's flying. Girl Passes Test for Honesty, Anyhow DENVER A 17-year- old girl charged with driv- ing without an operator's license appeared before Municipal Judge Gerald Mcauliffe Tuesday. Asked for an explanation, Carol Cooper replied: "1 didn't think 1 could drive well enough tc get one." The judge suspended of the girl's fine and suggested she "see if she could get one." Calif. Satellite Delayed 3rd Time VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE difficul- ties have forced a third post- ponement of firing of Discov- erer III into north-south orbit with four mice passengers. The postponement came Tuesday after six hours and 15 minutes of delays blamed on the weather and technical troubles. While the Air Force would not say when a new attempt will be made, indicatiOM we it cannot be before Tbunditjr,   

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