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Press Telegram Newspaper Archive: May 20, 1959 - Page 1

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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - May 20, 1959, Long Beach, California                             Lakewood Wife in River Ordeal Prays for Mate HOFFA DENIES STRIKE THREAT; SOLON ASKS CONGRESS ACTION Tress HOME The Finest Evening Newpapcr LONG BEACH 12, CALIF., WEDNESDAY, MAY 20, 1959 Vol. LXXll-No. 92 1'RICE 10 CENTS 64 PAGES CLASSIFIED HE 2-5959 TELEPHONE HE 5-1161 EDITION (Six Editions Daily) MRS. LILLIAN RICH, 64, of Lakewood, sits in a 'f wheelchair in Moab, Utah, hospital Tuesday after surviving boating mishap on Colorado River. (AP) DR. DELBERT F. RICH (right) relates how he saved his wife in boat mishap but saw parents float down rapids. His mother later was found alive. PENNEY RICH Struggled to Shore House OKs Budget for Space Unit WASHINGTON UP) The House today passed a bill giv- ing the civilian space agency 480% million dollars in spending authority for year beginning July 1. The roll call vote of the 294 128 sent the bill on to' the Senate. Among other things, the measure authorizes the National Aeronautics ant Space Administration to spend 70 million dollars for Project Mercury, the manned space flight program 4 ALTHOUGH the first at tempt to put a man into qrbil is not expected for appr'dxi niately 18 months, NASA officials plan several short range test flights of rockets with men aboard during the coming fiscal year. This bill authorizes th spending. A separate bill to make actual appropriations is pending before the House Appropriations Committee. Mrs. Lillian Rich of Lake- wood, who miraculously sur- vived a nightmarish two-day ordeal in the Colorado River country of southeast Utah, marked her 64th birthday to- day by praying for the safety of her still-missing husband. Mrs. Rich and her husband, Frank A. Rich, 65, of 5943 Dagwood Ave., were hurled into the river's churning rapids Sunday morning when their motorboat overturned. Wearing lifejackets, they were washed downstream. 'I last saw my husband hanging onto the back of the boat as it was going down Mrs. Rich said. "He told me not to panic." MRS. RICH was washed ashore. After hiking across 10 miles of desolate wilder- she was rescued by a helicopter shortly before noon Tuesday. "I had just about given she said as she was 4 Lose Lives in Shootings in Louisiana Woman, 2 Police and Sun-Crazed Man Are Victims LA FAYETTE, La. UP> A gun-crazed Negro shot and killed a white woman today, barricaded himself in his house when officers called on him to surrender and killed two policemen before he was shot to death. One of the policemen, Sgt. Leroy King, was killed almost instantly and his companion, Capt. Harold Abadie, died a few minutes later. King was shot in the face and Abadie took a charge from a 16- gauge shotgun in the stomach. Dr. Henry Voorhies, cor- oner for Lafayette Parish (county) identified the Negro as Albert Victor. Voorhies said Victor apparently barri- caded himself in the house after sneaking into the home of Mrs. Paul Ducharme arid shooting the young white mother at clo'se range. CHIEF OF POLICE Carlo Listi was struck in the neck by a blast from Victor': shotgun and Asst. Chief Don Ion Ritchey was struck by few pellets. Ritchey sufferec only slight injury. Officers lobbed tear gas and hand grenades into Vic tor's house which caught fin minutes later. Victor wa: found with a fatal bulle wound in the stomach afte officers dragged him from th laming house. Voorhies gave this version He said Victor apparentl> sneaked into Mrs. Ducharme' lome, shot her at close rang as she sat at a dressing tab! and then returned to hi louse. He beckoned tw 1 white youths, Jame Rogers, 10, and Wilson Lag inais Jr., 9, into the house The boys knew him and wen in and said Victor began ty ing them up. They said the broke the ropes and fled. taken to Moab, Utah, from where search for her hus- band is being directed. "Bui never lost faith." Rich, a retired barber, and his wife had moved to Lake- wood only a few months ago from Elsinore. They went to Utah a week ago to visit their son and daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. Delbert F. Rich. Dr. Rich is an optometrist in Cedar City, Utah. t THE OLDER couple were "quite the outdoor Dr. Rich told The Press-Tele- gram. "They've had a lot of camp- ing they've never been around water he said. The four had set out to gether Sunday mo'rning to take part in a 196-mile "Friendship Cruise" along the Green and Colorado Rivers. (Continued Page A-3, Col. 8) MRS. CARL LeBLAN sa the boys enter Victor's hous (Continued Page A-3, Col. 5 Seaplane Blast Kills Five Men BALTIMORE W An ex plosion racked the hull of seaplane being cleaned wit a commercial solvent in Martin Co. hangar today, kil ing five workmen and inju ing at least five others. A Martin spokesman sai a dozen or so men were ball ing the hull of a P5M2 Marli two-engined seeaplane with cleaning fluid using pressur hoses when a muffled expli sion rocked the interior o the hull. The company said the caus of the blast had not been termined. ORGIVING Takes Back Wife Hiring His Murder MIAMI W) "I don't anybody in the world who would take a woman oack after she paid some- one to kill said the judge. His words were spoken Tuesday to Mrs. Beatrice Gurley, who offered a de- tective to kill her husband. At her side stood the husband, Dave, his arm around her waist. Judge Ben Willard freed her despite her plea of guil- ty to a charge of attempted murder. >'r a "YOU'RE NOT' uneasy sleeping out there in the same house with the judge asked Gurley. "Not a replied the husband. "Well, 1 just hope you know what you're doing. If you can sleep out there without fear, it's all right with me." Mrs. Gurley, 41, made the deal for her husband's death with Ralph Metcalf, a detective who posed as a killer for hire. Gurley told the court: "My wife just got mixed up." C.130 Hits Barracks, Three Die TOKYO big turbo >rop transport plane crashei nto a U. S. Air Force bar racks and burst into flame n southern Japan today, kil! ng three persons and injurin 14. Two of the injured wer Durned seriously. The four-engine C130 wa trying to land at Ashiya ai base with one engine conket out. It was returning from Iwo Jima, the U. S. Air Fore said. An Air Force spokesma said there were eight me aboard the plane. One of th crew members was reporte killed. The other two kille were in the barracks. The Air Force said fe were in the. barracks at th time. Personnel were at th dining hall. Names of casualties wer being withheld pending not fication of next of kin. 119 Saved as Ferry Sinks in Storm RIO DE JANEIRO, Braz ferryboat carrying ]2 commuters across Guanabar Bay sunk today in a heav rainstorm. All but eight pa sengers were reported save Navy launches and privat craft joined in rescue opera tions. The bay was reporte full of life preservers carryin those who escaped. Soviet Urged o Reconsider West's Plan Prolonged Disunity Will Be Harmful, Herter Declares GENEVA S. Secre- ary of State Christian A Herter appealed to Russia oday to reconsider its rejec- ion of German unification as he basis for a German peace ettlement. In a solemn speech directed t Soviet Foreign Minister ndrei Gromyko across the lig Four conference table, lerter warned that prolonged German disunity "can only esult in disaster for those liat stand in the way" of uni ication. He argued that only nited German people can de- ermine the future of the erman nation, then added "Until the Soviet Union ecognizes these self-evident acts and cooperates to this nd, there will never be a olution of the German prob- em or the problem of Eu- opean security." AT THE SAME time, Her er indicated that the Wes s willing to put aside one ection of package, plan fo inking unification with dis armament and European se curity. He said the Western xiwers do not insist on gen oral disarmament as a condi ion for unifying Germany jromyko has blasted thi package as a tangle of un related issues. Since reunification, not dis armament, is the heart of th problem, this seemed unlike iy to offer a new induce rrient to Gromyko, who ha stated flatly that Russia wi not negotiate on unification Herter said the Sovie Union apparently consider "that its security interest are better protected by pei petuating the partition t Germany." "If that is the case, (Continued Page A-3, Col. 6 CHUMMY TABLE PARTNERS WHERE TO FIND IT Bing Crosby's twins, Philli and Dennis, have develope differently. Third of serie Page A-8. Beach B-l, Hal A-23. A-23. C-6 to 13 B-4, 5. A-18. Death B-2. A-22. B-3. Shipping C-6. C-l, A-20. Tides, TV, C-H. Vital A-23. B-8, 9, 10. Your A-2. Debbie Lights Up Baudouin's Day KING BAUDOUIN of the Belgians chats with actress .Debbie Reynolds before they sat down to lunch at the MGM commissary in Hollywood Tuesday. (AP) Ike Gives Top Medal to Dulles WASHINGTON Presi- dent Eisenhower has con- 'erred the Medal of Freedom on John Foster Dulles. It is the nation's highest award to Bachelor King Belgium met an civilians. The former secretary ol ;lamorous movie stars Tues- lay but he seemed 'o have :yes only for Hollywood's newest bachelor girl, Debbie Reynolds. The 28-year-old ruler twice lad the petite film beauty as lis table partner, and both times he had little conversa- tion with anyone'Blse. He and danced into state, critically ill with can- cer and pneumonia complica- tions, received the medal Tuesday at Walter Reed Army Hospital. It was presented to him on behalf of the Presi- dent by Mrs. Dulles. IN A "DEAR FOSTER' note accompanying the medal Eisenhower wrote: "It is an honor and a privi- lege to award you this Meda of Freedom. Inadequate though it is to express my gratitude and the gratitude ol the nation you have servec so well, it does stand as a small token of the affection and esteem that the people of America and of the work hold for you and your tire- less efforts on behalf of free- dom." The President, signed the note with his E.' Pain relieving drugs are keeping Dulles generally com fortable as he clings to life He sleeps much of the time in his hospital room. DYING VETERAN'S PLEA TO LONG BEACH: Please Find Girl He Mef Once, Loves Cupid, hoping to grant a dying veteran's wish, put the Long Beach Police Department to work today. The policemen's mission of romance: Find Billie Barnes, ash blonde, green eyes. The ex-serviceman, William F. Van Horn, now in a veterans hospital at Wadsworth, Kan., knew her only a few short hours during World War II. They spent the time walking, hand in hand, around Rainbow Pier, looking at the sea, talking. A few short hours that have lived since in Van Horn's heart. He couldn't get in touch with her when he was shipped out to the South Pacific. As with others, the war dealt harshly with Van Horn. For him, the war never really ended. He was transferred from hospital to hospital with lit- tle time in between to try to find the girl in Long Beach. "I've always loved he wrote to Police Chief Wil- liam H. Dovey. "I would have gone back to Long Beach and married herjf I hadn't been all shot to pieces. "But I want to marry her now, so she'll get what little I have to leave behind." Physicians have told him he has a year, .or less, to live. He has an incurable lung and heart condition. Van Horn remembers that Billie worked at a Pike con- cession. He thinks she lived at the "Ocean View Hotel." He remembers, too, ash blonde hair, green eyes and a walk around Rainbow Pier. HOLLYWOOD 'Distortions'; Charged by Truck Boss McClellan Sees Peril to Nation ia'i; Teamster's Words HOUSTON Union President James E. Hoffa today denied he had threatened a nationwide strike reprisal for proposed're- strictive labor laws. He told the Houston Chrort- icle that accounts of his speech in Brownsville, Tek'., Tuesday were "distortion's of the truth." He said there is 'no threat of a nationwide Teamsters' strike whatever.'-' The Associated Pres report- er at the Brownsville meeting, Whitey Sawyer, said howevei1 he quoted Hojfa correctly. Sawyer said he talked :to Hoffa after the Brownsville: meeting and the union presi- dent then repeated the threat. Daily newspapers in the lower Rio Grande Valley, working car- ried virtually the same word- ing. HOFFA, ADDRESSING convention of longshoremen at Brownsville; was quoted by the AP.as saying in refer- ence to restrictive labor 'The only answer is that- if such a law is passed, we should have all of our con- tracts end on a given date. They talk about a secondary boycott. We can call a. pri- mary strike all across the tion that will straighten Tout the employers once and-for all." In Washington, Sen.. John McClellan (D-Ark) today urged Congress to meet Hbffa's challenge head-on. McClellan, chairman of Baudouin of array of Miss Reynolds the early-morn- ng hours at a party held in lis honor. The party didn't jreak up until nearly 2 a.m. about half an hour after Miss Reynolds left. .HIS LUNCHEON guests at :he MGM commissary also ncluded such beauties as Mamie Van Doren, but Bau- douin's attention was fully taken up with 27-year-old Miss Reynolds. Only last week she was di- vorced by Eddie Fisher in Ne- vada so he could marry Eliza both Taylor. Miss Reynolds was one of the few unescorted women to attend the private dinner party Tuesday night at pro- ducer Mervyn Leroy's home in nearby Bel Air. About 20 to 25 guests were invited to the dinner. Most were married couples includ- ing Natalie Wood and Rob- ert Wagner, Kirk Douglas and his wife and Dick Powell and June Allison. 4 AT THE MGM luncheon Miss Reynolds carried on such an animated conversa- tion with the King that actor Glen Ford, who was seated on the King's other hand, had al- mpst no chance to get in a word. The King visits Disney- land today to wind up his three-day stay in Southern California. He will fly to San Francisco late today. Weather- Clear tonight, but some early morning clouds Thursday. Little warmer Thursday afternoon. Maximum temperature by noon today: 69. Senate Rackets. Committee, said he will introduce soon a bill he has talked about to apply the- anti-trust laws to transportation unions. McClellan saw real dangeY in Hoffa's words, which he called a threat against Con- gress and the people. He said the Teamsters chief should (Continued Page A-3, Col. I) Capture 2j Dope Load EL MONTE officers, arrested two .nrfeh Tuesday night in one of'the biggest narcotics seizures in Los Angeles County history. County and federal officers seized heroin they said would retail for a million doljars. Also in the men's car was "40 pounds of marijuana. R. B. Brooks, head. of the sheriff's narcotics divi- sion, said 20 ounces of'puri heroin found in the .auto would be cut for retail sale as 209 ounces of dope. He said the two Lopez, 26, and E. S. Frias Rod- riguez, "31, have connections with a Mexican dope ring which is believed to be one of the largest in the West. FEDERAL NARCOTICS agents said their undercover men ordered a ton of juana from the ring through Lopez and Rodriguez. Agents said the ring is re- ported to have been moving five tons of marijuana into the Southern California area.in the last two weeks. Lopez, Los artl Frias Rodriguez, of Mexicali, Mex., were booked on sus- picion of violating federal nar- cotics possession laws. FEDERAL AGENTS said a relative of Lopez' operates a. secret laboratory in the moun> tains of Sinaloa State in ico, turning out a 'very grade heroin. One federal of- ficer told reporters: "He's got a regular 'devlri den' down there hi brews this hell drug."   

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