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   Press-Telegram (Newspaper) - May 15, 1959, Long Beach, California                             RUSS PROPOSE GERMAN PEACE PACT Man Kills Wife, Police Chief, Self in 5-Hour Battle Charge Soviet Plan Seeks Permanent of Nation 'GENEVA Russia for- mally proposed to-the West tpttay a peace treaty to be signed with divided Germany. TneTJnited Staes said it was "Keenly disappointed" and ac- cused the Soviet Union of waijtihg to perpetuate the di- vision of Germany. The U. S. reaction was given in a statement issued imme- diately after the Big Four con- ference'ended its first week of, sessions with a recess un- til'Monday. 1 'in' a speech presenting the Russian treaty, draft which originally, made .public Jan. JO, Soviet Foreign Min- ister. Gromyko charged the West with fostering a renewal of .militarism in West many. British Foreign X Secretary Selwyn Lloyd challenged tjiis allegation, saying "we have our own views as. to where re- sponsibility" for the arms race lies. The West has often accused Russia over the years of forcing West German re- armament by arming East Germany. THE U. S. STATEMENT, issued by Assitant Secretary of State Andrew Herding at a newj- conference, said Gro- myko1 s speech and the Soviet treaty proposal show "the Soviet Union has made no effbrf whatever to meet W p's t e r n re- garding the Soviet draft." the statement declared, "it has presented the same old. proposals and Mr. i exposition has .not served to make them any more palatable than they were on Jan. 10." .The-United States and, its Allies- had denounced the Russian plan that time is being; designed-to keep'Ger- many, divided ,-iind to split West away from its Western Allies and neigh- bors': Radio Moscow went on thf air pr'omptly'wiih high lights of GromykP's in- cluding: 1. Conclusions of a peace treaty with Germany is im- portant and it will be indef- initely postponed if it has to wait 'on the formation of an alUGerman government. 2.' The treaty is now the wain issue in the Cold War. Gromyko scoffed at the Western argument that no treaty can be signed until an all'-German government is created. cannot regard this Page A-e, Col. 3) The Southland'? Finttl Evening Newtpaper LONG BEACH 12, CAUF., FRIDAY, MAY 15, 1S5I Vol. 88 -O CLASSIFIED HE 2-SMf 48 PAGES PRICE 10 CENTS TELEPHONE HE 1 EDITION (Six Editions Dairyf: GUNFIGHT AT LIMERICK State, troopers backed up by reserve police pump bullets into the home. of. Gordon E. Hamlin in Lim- erick, Maine, Thursday night. Three died and two were wounded in. five-hour photo.) Into U.S. Man Murdered in Mexico ENSENADA, Mex. Mexican .police said today that a missing Californian has beisn found murdered near En senada, 50 miles south of the border. Authorities said 42-year-olc Vernon Vicinas murderec by three men, whc killed him to .steal his car. .Vicinas, a carpenter from Escpndido, disappeared7 afte entering Baja California on a vacation. His father reported him. missing to authorities here May 5. POLICE SAID they found his car May 8 on a smal ranch near Ensenada. The; said the rancher, Siliverti Morales, 60, admitted takin; part in the murder. Vicinas' body was discov ercd Thursday in a gravi north of Ensenada. Police sail Mprales told, them Vicinas of fere'd him arid two other.men a ride to Tijuana at the bor der south of San Diego. Ei route, Morales said, the; knifed Vicinas" and buriet him. Mprales -in jail and th other two men ing fought. are still be DENTON Tex: col ge student power- ul'concentration of silver hi rate into the face of a pretty, 0-year-old coe'd Thursday ight and her. doctor -said she may be blinded a'nd disfig- red for life. "Silver-nitrate in that high oncentrate just cooks er doctor said today. The victjm is Miss" Sheila  ccurred as the climax: of a arty in an apartment. HE SAID six boys! were tresent but.no han-Miss Nelms, as well as e coiild determine. Anderson identified the man who threw .the chemica s Tommy Ray Lester, Corsi a fellow "student with tfiss Nelms at' North State College here. No charges were filed im mediately. Denton County Atty. Robert Caldwel! said case he charge in such a; would be aggravated "assault Anderson said the coec was flee the party when the chemical hrpwn. Bert Vliss Nelms, said she 'prob ably will lose the sight of he right eye, "She can see.ligh with her left, eye but no much the doctor said t THE PHYSICIAN said he iips, eyes, ears, face, nee and breasts all are severl Ixirned, Dr. Davis estimated the so lution to be about 95 per cen silver' nitrate. He said, a saf solution is-lb to 15 per'cen Charges'of aggravated as sault, a misdeameanor, w'er filed against Lester, 19, an ad vertising art major. The silver nitrate had bee mixed at a.biology laboratory and was' to have for. poisoning rats. Lester ,'r sided in Maine A businessman shot Ike to Seek 2-Mile-Long A-Smasher Plans to Ask Funds for Record-Size Device at Stanford NEW YORK dent Eisenhower, stressing need for basic nuclear re- search to' ,k evei p America he will seek fed- eral.funds to build a two-mile- at' '.University. V President made aVhtrl- wvindi. v j sit Thursday t6. Mah- iuittan, breaking" ground .for art .ah 'in- ternational trade fair anc speaking at. a dinner attends by the nation's top scientists He returned to Washington by presidential plane later in the evening. The President addressed about 500 scientists assembled at the Waldorf-Astoria. Hote for a symposium on basic re search sponsored by the Na tional Academy of Sciences the America Association fo the Advancement of scienci and the Alfred P. Sloan foun dation. v t HE TOLD THE gathering hat the proposed new atom ,0ut of Hails luck'; CANINE CAPER Ceiba, a 3-year-old German shepherd, is properly.decked out' for the role.as he tries to push Susan Harris, 1, along in her stroller- on a Washington, D. C., street. The dog, owned fay Bard M. Squires, is known for his ability to per- form tricks. And some trickster added a head scarf and eyeglasses for Ceiba to portray the feminine role of Wirephoto.) 20 Injured nd jtilled and then chiell-and punded. .typ troopers if ore" hisi-sufbide ended, a ve-hour jwijh !100J.6lfficers Thursday G ordpri 5 1 u pset yer" the" recent'-l lids his urniture. manufacturing, .biisi- ess, shot himseH as.'pblice osedjri on his cellar hoid- ut with bullets and tear gas. Also dead were Hamlin's 'life. Rose, 46, and Westbrpok olice Chief 'Harnois, 4, killed-respectively nd shotgun blasts.; State Trooper Stephen A. egina, 42, of Saco, was ritically wounded by Ham- n's shotgun in the stomach nd leg. His name is on the anger list in a portland hos- ital: Trooper Willard Parker was sss seriously .wounded on arms and abdomen. SCENE of the-blister- ng shooting was a quiet daine cr.bssroads settlement >y art old mill-pond about a mile frpm the.center ot Lim- rick, a village of ation'30 miles Po'rt- and. __ j Witnesses and.poH.ce pieced p.m. as Rose Jiam- in street'to visit rfrs. Jessie Mitchell, ;Hamlin houted to her from [por arid. .a shotgun. A? Mrs. Hamlin raced u.p (Continued Page 5) smasher, to 'cost 100 million would be ,far the argest .ofjts. k i nd ever. built." tt.fWpuld i take six. to "proposed nuclear unit would be roughly 50 times the length'. bf now at Stanford; Details, were announced, by the a year ;agb. The' schoolVthejn said it was hopeful of obtain- ing federal funds, struction, '.''v. i; V Although -emphasizing' thai the main reliance tific research and develop- ment must rest with-fpriyate organizations, Eisenhower said aid in building the new unit is one of the' ways in (Continued Page A-6, Col. 1) ar Rams Bus Wash.' Greyhound bus and an autompSile collided at: a ni'gh; Way intersection near here day: was Jlled bus issen'gers injured, nine'.'seri-l uslyM yThe, double-decker bus] xiund1. from.' Seattle to Spp, caiie, rolled embank- ment and tipped over- WHERE TO FIND IT Northern and Southern California senators fought to a draw in the first round, o the battle on Gov. Brown's water program. See Page A-4 Beach B-l. Hal B-l 1. D-l to 12. 11. Arl2. Death B-2. f B-3. Shlpprnj B-4. C-l to 7. B-8. Tides, TV, B-li; 3-11. B4, 7. Your A-2. U. S. Gambling Raids Snare 16 in County were arrested Thursday :in .Los Angeles On (lottery' arid ;iri 'Got a Try to Star Tells Newi'men NEW" YORK UPi Arthur Godfrey came .out of the pital today after dangerous lung' cancer and s.ai d, "I gqt' i I'll .'dainri- edest to and radio enterti7ife''chpkea- with, emotion as hi'first tried to! talk. waiting room of 7 tije. Hark- ness Pavilion, Colum- bia-Presbyteriari M e d i c a 1 Center. His aids tried to hustle him out but he refused.': he said, raising: a., hand. a minute.; I've, got to tell them this." AFTER BOWING his head in his ha'nd-a. moment he gan to talk again. He said he had been fright- ened before the operation and he :thought- it .would: help people realize, that'his fears rose from not knowing what, lay ahead of him. "I how much any of you know, what they did to me. "MOST.OF US were asleep yhen it happened and people list, suddenly, starteil, falling J Lover 'said-.Hershel Haynes, an Air Force captain stationed at Cottonwood, daho. "I was on the side that hit the ground. There wasn't too much screaming but a lot of Broken glass. Most of us went out the top window, and then helped the most seriously in- jured." Five ambulances were dis- patched to the scene a half mile west of this eastern Wash ihgton community in Lincoln County. ities. r' j ---r.'l' Four 16 local-nien irrested were of erp: and fifth resides ''in. 'Paramount. They WiUiam Angeles, an employe, of- the "ardena Club. Caesar ,W. 49, of Oil also, of. Electrical Workers Srrike in Jersey NEWARK, N. J. electrical 'maintenance workers struck' Service Electric Gas Co Thursday night. Supervisory personnel the generating .Public Service supplies percent.of New Jersey! Gas service was not involved. series.of raids whicK Ireasury .agents persons in seven major damnable ,was not orir- oriry- ui wrapped yessie! Uie around, the" Curtis v '41pqf. 2108 Compton Blvd., Gardena. Jack Williams, 48, of 16257 Virginia Ave., Paramount. The Internal Revenue Serv- ice said large amounts of cash, gambling equipment and confiscated throughout, the country in what it described as a "co- ordinated crackdown" on a nationwide gambling combi- nation. i. ALL THE arrests charged that the suspects violated the federal wagering act which re quires gamblers.'to for a .stamp 'anc 10 per centTof :their gross in come j The'IRS said the 'raids: were aimed o' i who laid? wi th -one. a n other.] B6ofernakers, it'was: ex this.; sys" tern'. A-6, Col 13) 'LOS 'ANGELES (UPI) 5ennis. 25-year-pki to pay'a you." MAN AND DOG IN WATER 2V2 DAYS The eon .would' have been in was aorta, heart. sewing saying, 1 can't do a thirig'V'' .GODFREY ,a ornentj..' lips, trembied an4- 'he' tctjk 'a hinibierchiej fforn-his pocket to' hi? eyes'. "But I. got a he got t .out, under, circiimstances so trying' that 'one slip one- way-': or 'the.V.other, and I wouidn't.'be. ;hepe .talking Capsizes in Grand Canyon GRAND CANYON, Ariz, ftfl A somewhat subdued adventurer, rescued after more than two days fighting rapids and rocks in the Grand Canyon, today blamed ignorance and foolishness for his ordeal. "It was my first attempt to run the river by said Earl San Manuel. "And I believe it will be 'the last, too." Francis went without food or sleep' for days while he struggled nine miles down the dangerous Colorado from the.Sockdolager Rapids where his carioe capsized. vi; and hugging his dbg, Cadillac; Francis was hauled from the river Thursday by a group, of National Park Service rescuers. "A guy's kinda foolish to try something like he said after, reaching (he south rim of the canyon today. tell me it's.foolish to get oh that river without, a special rig. They require a permit and inspect the rig before'approving any trips and that's the way it should be done; But I didn't know about it. '.'They should never allow anyone to go alone." Francis and his dog started the trip at Lee's Ferry, about 70 'miles upstream from Phantom Ranch at the bottom of the canyon. "It's beautiful country and I wanted to get some pic- he said. "I had put the worst part of the river behind me and then I let a little ripple throw me." He lost all his' supplies with the canoe, which was found floating on the river at Phantom Ranch. BUT FRANCIS AND HIS DOG had on life preservers which.kept'them'afloat and managed to stay out of the worst of the river's boiling rapids as. they struggled down- stream. There were few places, they could get out of the water, which between sheer 'canyon walls rising hundreds of feet. "From sundown to sunup, a mari wouldn't have much chance in the Francis said. "So I just had.to wait. I'd curl up on a rock or a sandbar." "It was a rough trip, but'not as bad as it might have 'been." "How did Cadillac come guess he made out'better than I young monthly support for her 17-month-old daughter pending trial of a paternity suit naming him the child's father. Superior Court .'Commis- sioner Victor J. Hayek also ordered young Crosby to pay for Mrs. Marilyn Mil- Scott's a 11 o r n'e y who agreed that a new blood test will be taken from the child Deriise Michelle, for'compari- son with Dennis' blood at trial of .the paterity: issue. Mrs. Scott, a'slim brunette, said already .was receiving from Crosby at- torneys but needed more. r "SHE D E NIS E doesn't have enough so I have; to wash'- the mother reported and defended a request for medical expens- es by saying the.child was "pigeon-toed and bowleggcd must wear- braces every night1 to bed." Y'o.uhg. Crosby, one of BingV. twins, has! never ad- mitted parentage of! the child, although shevcontends her chief in- terest is in having the baby established as his child and Drotecting its legal rights as lis daughter. The alleged romance be- tween Mrs. Scott and Dennis was first revealed: last May when she filed a birth certifi- cate listing him as the father. At that time, young Crosby had just married showgirl Pat Shcehan, 27, and last Decem- ber they had a son. "I'm grateful for it'and I'll do my damnedest to deserve. At this point voice broke. AFTER IJE recovered him-' self and insisted on talking he' explained that he felt his words may help others. "Why 1 want to talk to be' said in a faltering voice, "yoi will take to. the people. thr message from be of help to "Inside 1 was afraid. The; reason T was afraid, I didn't; know. Like all aviators I'm' not afraid of what I know about. Every time a flier' (Continued Page 4) Production at All-Time High in A WASHINGTON. Weather- Some tew doads to- riight early Saturday. Moftly many Saturday Md-sHcMly warmer. Maximum teiiipetatufe by hooB today: 71, government- said today; duction-.hit ;an all-time high in April. The Federal Reservi; Board's index of industrial production moved up' two points to .149 .per cent of 1947-49. average.- This compared with a pre-'. recession peak of 146 in Febi" ruary 1957, and with a reces- sion low of 126 in April 1958. ACTIVITY -.in the durable; goods industries rose sub-' stantially and equaled the ad- vance level of early the boird said.'. The', board satd'production; of soft goods aljo inCi-eased last, month but- mnjtrab out- put was little Building ;produc- tion was at. a rebo and steel output -bucked sonal trends to riM a new pbrt-rrrrmum 'fcigji.'   

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